Underground airline

  1. angelo909 Member

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    notts UK
    Hi guys, I am in process of plumbing my compresser to the shed and wondered if it were a good idea to plumb the airline underground?

    the compresser is a very short distance from the shed - no more than 1.5 metres apart but I was wondering if there would be much of a water condensation problem to overcome along this point.


    I have 3 water traps, a few metres of 15mm rigid hose and various push fit elbows to work with

    Can anyone help me decide please?
     
  2. rtbcomp

    rtbcomp Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    18,471
    Location:
    Sheffield UK
    I don't see a problem, but if you can arrange a slope away from the compressor and maybe have a pit with a self-draining water trap in it at the end of the slope.

    EDIT - Some insulation round the pipe & trap would be good to stop it freezing up in winter.
     
    angelo909 likes this.
  3. angelo909 Member

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    notts UK
    mint Ill order an elbow tee and get this plumbed in!
    thank you for your help :)
     
  4. Dcal Member

    Messages:
    894
    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    Only problem I see is if the pipe run is at the lowest point in your system ( as seems likely) all the water in the system will collect there so as @rtbcomp says some way of draining the water is needed.
    Can you install a small chamber at the low end to give you access if anything goes wrong.
    Also might be worth putting it in a duct (say 4 inch?) so you can replace or upgrade without digging ii all up again but as it's only a short run that might be overkill.
     
    angelo909 likes this.
  5. Anguz Member

    Messages:
    337
    bedfordshire
    Mines like this... It's done in blue mdpe water pipe
     
    angelo909 likes this.
  6. bricol Member

    Messages:
    614
    N.Yorks, UK
    I thought this was about joining the elite group of model aircraft pilots that I am a member of - underground airways . . . ;-)

    I just have a good water trap (drop out) at the business end of the 22mm nylon pipe I have running from a hydrovane under my house, under the garden and back up into the garage. Not noticed any issues yet.
     
    daleyd and angelo909 like this.
  7. angelo909 Member

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    notts UK
    Cheers guys for all suggestions this is very reassuring. Im now thinking to position a water trap inside some kind of lidded enclosure before plumbing up through the floor of the shed.
     
  8. atomant48

    atomant48 Member

    Messages:
    654
    Salisbury UK
    The title caught my eye but not what I was expecting
     
    hunter27 likes this.
  9. brightspark

    brightspark Member

    Messages:
    25,744
    Location:
    yarm
    not a good idea for the pipe to go down and back up. all the water will collect at lowest point :vsad:and underground it will condense a lot with the ground been cold
     
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  10. angelo909 Member

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    notts UK
    Thanks for all input folks. ive decided after your advice to place another trap at the lowest point before going back up to the main ring. This also has a couple of traps installed so hopefully will be dry at the point of use.
    Thanks again guys im very grateful for the support
     
  11. Morrisman

    Morrisman Member

    It’s an airline. Give it a good hard blast though at full pressure and any water that builds up will soon come flying out the end. :whistle:
     
    cianh91 likes this.
  12. brightspark

    brightspark Member

    Messages:
    25,744
    Location:
    yarm
    yes and then what . in use it will build up again quickly and cause problems :rolleyes:
     
  13. Morrisman

    Morrisman Member

    You could put a dryer in it, I have one in mine. Just because it goes underground doesn’t create any more moisture in the air than any other routing.
     
  14. brightspark

    brightspark Member

    Messages:
    25,744
    Location:
    yarm
    it doesn't create any more moisture it condenses it as it is colder than the above ground pipe and in a trough . spend extra and buy the drier if that's the case I have never found the need
     
  15. bricol Member

    Messages:
    614
    N.Yorks, UK
    Mine runs 5m under a patio up into my garage in 22mm nylon. With the Dropout trap as it comes into the garage, I've not noticed any issues. Admittedly I don't spray, but do blast and not noticed any moisture in the cabinet.
     
  16. dannyp Member

    Ran air 100 ish mtrs in blue water pipe before, you do get a fair bit of condensate if running a lot of warm down it. But that’s what water traps are for.

    I don’t bother with traps at the compressors any more as they never caught anything one when it enters ether shed If I’m spraying I put an extra one in Just have a male and femail pcl on it. If I’m doing fancy paint I plug a dryer into that as well. Refrigerant dryer in top workshop. Or desiccant in lower one
     
  17. Morrisman

    Morrisman Member

    The moisture is in the air, regardless what you do with the hose run. Either you leave it in, or you take it out with a dryer. Depends if you are spraying or not. Or blasting, or something that requires dry air.

    If you want to remove it then it is better if it does condense into droplets somewhere in the system.

    For some reason I never get any in my compressor, even when it is freezing cold in the garage. I crack open the drain occasionally, just air comes out.
     
  18. julianf

    julianf Member

    Messages:
    3,781
    Location:
    devon, uk
    I feel like I'm missing something here?

    Air direct from the compressor needs to be treated whatever way you look at it.

    Why not do the underground bit on the untreated air, and do the treatment on the other side.

    Then what does it matter if the underground leg is dripping with water. If anything you could look at it as a deldeliberate condensator!
     
    Morrisman likes this.
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