Talk to me about shed roofs

  1. Maker

    Maker nEw mEmBeR

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    Been home from uni less than 24 hours and mum's already got me peeling back the shed roof. :clapping:

    There's a bit of rotten wood to chop out and replace, easy peasy, but I don't really know what I'm doing with regards to the felt. In the past I've just nailed it down but I'm aware you can glue it or use a blowtorch which I assume is the preferable to banging nail holes thorough my nice new waterproof surface.

    Can someone tell me what to buy? It's about an 8' by 16' roof sloping a few degrees to one side if that matters. The plan is to order it all tonight and get it done as soon as possible before our bikes get wet. :ashamed:
     
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  2. Ashley Burton

    Ashley Burton Member

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    Some pictures would be good

    When you say you need to chop out some rotten wood is this one of the cross supports?

    I assume the roof is boarded?

    You can use Roofing Felt Adhesive to stick the felt down & use some batterns to make sure it doesn't come up in the wind
     
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  3. TechnicAl

    TechnicAl Member

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    The paint on adhesive works well....no need for heat...but be prepared as you will end up covered in tar and it takes some shifting......well I end up covered but I am messy
     
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  4. Maker

    Maker nEw mEmBeR

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    I spent all afternoon yesterday lifting the T&G, the lengths on the low edge had disintegrated and the ends of the joists are a bit soft, I'd like to replace the lot but it's only 6 inches or so at the ends that's wet and mum's paying so I'm just gonna cut off the damage and screw maybe 600mm of new wood to the side of them. Excuse the holes in the hardboard ceiling, I took the lights down before I started and it was a bit dark inside so I made a quick skylight using a hammer. :laughing: It's providing a tiny bit of rain protection at the moment but it will come down as soon as I'm ready to put the new roof on, possibly to be replaced with OSB if it bothers us.

    20200701_114150.jpg 20200701_114242.jpg
    This might all be pointless anyway, that orange flex powers the sockets that powers my compressor, it'll probably burn the whole thing down soon. :rolleyes:
     
  5. Ashley Burton

    Ashley Burton Member

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    @Maker Looks a pretty straightforward job to me
     
  6. Maker

    Maker nEw mEmBeR

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    Yep the carpentry is the easy part, it's just the felt I don't know what I'm doing. There's some shiplap on the sides to replace and some storage to build inside too but that's less of a priority.
     
  7. angellonewolf

    angellonewolf Member

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    5,084
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    bristol england
    for quick and easy nail it down it works use clought nails and on any joins a line of mastic make sure you start at the bottem work up so the water runs off

    ive done the adhesive as above got a in a right mess plenty of rags and pvc cleaner was the only thing i had to remove the tar stuff with (a guy doing it day in day out would be ok unless you know how tricks) expect to get yourself covered in it the job i done when finshed look great and still up there now 10 ish years later but i did not look as clean when done

    clean clean clean make as meny cuts as you can before opening the tin
     
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  8. jimbo84 Forum Supporter

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    1,123
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    Up North
    Epdm rubber is decent by all accounts, it can be had a bit thinner and cheaper at pond supply places rather than roofing places, glue it on.

    Oduline currugated sheets.

    Just done mine in metal roofing sheets.
     
    jerrytug likes this.
  9. axomoxia Member

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    47
    Location:
    uk
    I used twin wall polycarbonate sheeting when I did mine. After diving into a rabbit hole of felting, underlays and adhesives, it seems a lot easier to use something I could install with a hammer.....
     
  10. Gragson

    Gragson Forum Supporter

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    626
    Location:
    Bucks
    Did mine recently and clout nailed all the felt down laying top to bottom of slope per @angellonewolf
    I laid new batons on top as they were before but using skinny brad nails - that was a mistake as I got a leak in a heavy prolonged downpour - I should have screwed them down
     
  11. bricol Member

    Messages:
    1,023
    N.Yorks, UK
    Buy some decent felt from a local builders merchant rather than dog-kennel stuff from the DIY palaces - its thicker, stronger and longer lasting. Roofing nails will work fine - it will seal around them. And don't be stingy with them.

    Ultimate is some reclaimed steel roofing sheets - I simply batterned over the top of the dog-kennel stuff that came with and attached the sheet - any leaks through the original fixings run down the felt, which is nicely protected from the elements by the steel.
     
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  12. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

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  13. Maker

    Maker nEw mEmBeR

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    Is this decent stuff? Phoned them and been quoted 35 quid a roll which is a bit more wallet friendly. :D
     
  14. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    What's the pitch on your roof, looks fairly shallow in the pic.
     
  15. Maker

    Maker nEw mEmBeR

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    Falls about 8 inches over it's 100 inch length, I think it's just the perspective makes it look shallow.
     
  16. TechnicAl

    TechnicAl Member

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    7,225
    Location:
    Rotherham
    You want the fibre glass reinforced stuff.....Ive got a shed full waiting to go on....I think the iko stuff is only 8m long...RHINOFLEX is the stuff that was recommended to me...its also 10m long so I can do my shed without joints in one direction...I got mine direct but I needed 8 rolls
     
  17. gaz1

    gaz1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    10,087
    Location:
    westyorkshire
    4 woods are rotten or going

    better to rip off and replace all of them

    you need torch on felt if your going down the blow lamp route gas bottle and gun
     
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  18. Rudi McAnichal Member

    Messages:
    331
    UK
    White spirit will remove bitumen adhesive from your hands, but if the stuff gets on your clothes they might as well go straight into the bin bag.

    Onduline lasts fairly well if laid on top of sarking boards (lots of people complain that it sags badly if supported only by purlins), small holes can be easily repaired with bitumen, and I have never had condensation problems. Coroline is similar material, cheaper but thinner and more flimsy. Metal should have longer life, but needs adequate insulation and ventilation if you don't want the roof to drip. I think Onduline sheets are all 2m length, whereas the OP could probably get long metal sheets and avoid any need for overlaps.
     
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  19. TechnicAl

    TechnicAl Member

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    7,225
    Location:
    Rotherham
    I tried onduline on one of my sheds....yes it sags but its not easy to fix because you cant stand on it to reach the top....plus the sheets themselves are quite cheap but by the time youve bought the filling bits and the edges and the top tile bits it gets very expensive.
     
  20. Maker

    Maker nEw mEmBeR

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    We had a quick look at Oduline and decided felt is cheaper, and good enough for everyone else's sheds.
     
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