Suitable Sieve For Media

  1. Pollys13

    Pollys13 Member

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    !20 mesh grit. Would this do? Ebay 123976255463
    Thanks.
     
  2. fizzy Forum Supporter

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    uk
    That will do but I find it easier to use a normal household sieve! The big flat ones make a mess as they spread it wide.
    Just don't tell her indoors:laughing:
     
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  3. Pollys13

    Pollys13 Member

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    Wiltshire UK
    OK thanks, think might get something with handles and fine mesh.
     
  4. fizzy Forum Supporter

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    I have both but still prefer the household one!
     
  5. Pollys13

    Pollys13 Member

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    OK cheers.
     
  6. Dcal Member

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    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    The one that came with the blast pot that fits into the funnel are good and I still have the one that came with the pot.

    I also use a bigger one that came with 3 different screens that I got from the local hardware store.
    It is excellent but you need to sieve sieve the grit into a gorilla tub or similar.
    I think they are for sieving topsoil and if you double up on the screens you can go as fine as you like.
     
  7. Pollys13

    Pollys13 Member

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    Location:
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    My pot didn't have one I'll look around for something suitable.
     
  8. Pollys13

    Pollys13 Member

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    I was thinking about this mesh screen. I have several B&Q orange buckets for collecting from grit from the bottom of the cabinet. I could make timber frame use galvanised U nails to hold mesh in place. If I got a 40cm x 40cm would allow a wide boarder to nail to bottom of frame to give it plenty of support.
    Would a 1mm mesh screen size do for 120 grit?
     
    • Mesh Screen.jpg
  9. Dcal Member

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    1,461
    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    Mine came in one piece, I'll post a photo when I get home.
    They are bigger diameter than a yellow bucket, so the need to use a gorilla tub, but can sieve a lot of stuff in short order.
     
  10. Pollys13

    Pollys13 Member

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    " sieve a lot of stuff in short order. " Yes that was how I was thinking.Couple of points made by guys on metalworking forum in States,about undoing pipe fittings that used high strength threadlock, " For heat control, use some wet rags wrapped around the pipe; very effective, and you can dribble water on them if you think they are drying out. Put one behind your metal flame shield to protect the wall paint. Drape a wet rag over the regulator body as soon as you finish heating."

    I though could turn fridge low and leave container of water in it overnight. Or put a contaner of water in freezer and keep an eye on it so doesn't freeze. Or if water too cold and heat possibility of damaging the fittings?

    " For heating use a source that will deliver a lot of heat to a small area quickly, such as acetylene, or at least propane. This seems counterintuitive, but the goal is to bring the area of interest to the desired temperature as quickly as possible so that nearby areas don't get too hot before you finish. To do this you need to develop a steep temperature gradient, which means pumping heat in really fast.
    Use a weak, low-temperature source such as a heat paint stripping gun and the entire assembly will be at 450F before the stuck fitting reaches 550F (it it ever gets there at all).

    The drawback of acetylene is the risk of melting the thing. That *would* get it apart, though. " Just Googled Gorrila tub, quite a bit bigger than a B&Q bucket. I'll have a look and check prices on Screwfix etc. I'm not sure if Gorrila tubs are rigid though? Just had a look, ridgid tubs are on Ebay but pricey.
     
  11. Dcal Member

    Messages:
    1,461
    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    These are the sieves I use.
    First one is what came with the pot, including funnel. (195mm dia)
    I still use it a lot as it fits in the pot

    IMG_9791.JPG

    Top-soil sieve 365mm dia.

    IMG_9788.JPG

    Sieves in a gorilla tub.

    IMG_9794.JPG
     
  12. Pollys13

    Pollys13 Member

    Messages:
    333
    Location:
    Wiltshire UK
    OK thanks for that. Don't think will bother with the expense of a tub and screen mesh, will get a sieve from Poundland or Asda and see how I get on.
     
    fizzy likes this.
  13. optima21 Forum Supporter

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    Location:
    halifax, England
    I use a 0.16mm sieve and a 0.6mm sieve from ebay

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/352132316715

    I use the fine mesh first to get rid of the pieces of crushed glass that are now just dust (into the big tub) then have the large mesh on the top of the blaster to remove the debris that is too large to go through again

    [​IMG]
     
  14. fizzy Forum Supporter

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    5,109
    uk
    The beauty of a bog standard sieve is that it is small enough to sieve directly into the funnel.
    The bigger sieves are great for monster machines.
     
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  15. Pollys13

    Pollys13 Member

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    333
    Location:
    Wiltshire UK
    OK thanks guys.
     
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