Remember that strange lathe on ebay? (Willson slantbed)

  1. martsrods Member

    Messages:
    66
    Location:
    Solihull
    I don't know if any of you remember this thread..

    http://www.mig-welding.co.uk/forum/threads/very-strange-lathe-on-ebay.59044/

    Anyway I've been tinkering away on the Willson relearning long forgotten skills. One of the big advantages of the slant bed design is it's ability to accommodate large diameters. well, bigger than most other lathes of a similar overall size. The Willson is about as big as I'd want to go in my home workshop. Anyway, machining is my new hobby. My second hobby. Hot rods and Ford V8s are my first hobby, and being able to use my second hobby to support my first hobby is rewarding.

    I needed to machine down the rear axle bearing surface on one side of a 1940 Ford axle housing. Thinking the Willson would take anything I could throw at it, I was disappointed to find the axle casing would not swing. After a bout of considering different options I decided to heat and bend the offending spring perch and gain the clearance I needed.

    Anyway I thought you guys would like to see the Willson in action swinging what will probably be the biggest job I am likely to set up in it. It's a good job the lathe is the long bed version. I don't think the standard length unit would have taken the axle casing.

    I put this up on Youtube:



    And a few pics. Everybody likes pics, right?

    The job in the lathe. The offending perch can just be seen the other side of the toolpost.
    [​IMG]
    Yes, the shelves behind are in fact the end cut off a pallet! waste not want not.


    To get it between centres (sort of) I had to make up an adaptor. The adaptor was a good excuse for me to machine some tapers. Morse taper 5 on the headstock end, and a taper to match the inside of the bearing race on the other end. The bolt transfers the drive to the casing flange.

    [​IMG]

    Once machined I was able to get the repair sleeve on nice and snug. The finished job looks good and serviceable
    [​IMG]
    The grey area shows where the perch was heated, bent and then reheated and restraightened.

    Anyway I just thought it would be nice to post a follow up to the original "strange lathe" thread.

    Mart.
     
  2. Ton-up

    Ton-up Member

    Messages:
    1,593
    Location:
    Essex, England.
    Well done, shows what you can do with a bit of inginuety! I had a Wilson slant bed, i gave it to a guy who has rebuilt it and uses it all the time. Nice lathes.
     
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  3. UNCLE CHUFTY New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Bournemouth, UK
    Any idea if this chap is screwcutting on the Willson slant bed, and if so, has he got the extra metric pitches?
    cheers, UNCLE CHUFTY
     
  4. Hopefuldave Intergalactic pot-mender

    Messages:
    1,667
    Location:
    The Shed of Danger, surrey, England
    Even if it hasn't got metrics "natively" you can fit translating gears for the metric pitches - but you can't use the thread dial if it has an imperial leadscrew, you have to keep the leadscrew half-nuts engaged and reverse the whole machine between threading passes - easy enough once you're used to it.

    Dave H. (the other one)
     
  5. Ton-up

    Ton-up Member

    Messages:
    1,593
    Location:
    Essex, England.
    Sorry, I don't know and can't recall any metric gears. I don't see him very often, but will ask him next time I do.
     
  6. UNCLE CHUFTY New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Bournemouth, UK
    The Willson slant bed has a screwcutting gearbox, not loose gears, but it only has 4 metric pitches as standard. Apparently by changing the main drive gear you can get the missing metric pitches. That's the information I'm trying to find.
    Appreciate any help, UNCLE CHUFTY
     
  7. Hopefuldave Intergalactic pot-mender

    Messages:
    1,667
    Location:
    The Shed of Danger, surrey, England
    What's the standard gear train from spindle to QCGB? Usually a compound idler goes in, 100 and 127 tooth is typical, to do the metric conversion. I recommend the Screw cutting book in the Workshop Practice series, I think it's by Ivan Law? Which has lots of alternative setups.

    Dave H. (the other one)

    Nope, No. 3 in the series, "Screwcutting in the lathe" by Martin Cleeve, not Ivan Law - still recommended!
     
  8. Hopefuldave Intergalactic pot-mender

    Messages:
    1,667
    Location:
    The Shed of Danger, surrey, England
    Stolen from the Lathes.co.uk site's page on the Willson slant-bed:

    "13/8" in diameter, the 5 t.p.i leadscrew drove an oil-immersed screwcutting gearbox that gave 40 English and, with the deployment of a 125/127T pair, 8 metric threads (though one of these, being a non-standard 0.625 mm pitch, was there just to make up the numbers). Unusually for an affordable English-specification lathe of the period, the metric screwcutting was available "on demand" - this being achieved by bringing into mesh (by simply moving a single lever) the 125t gear that revolved on the same spindle as the 127 (the two gears, though having different numbers of teeth, were made the same diameter so they meshed with the 50t gear without having to adjust the setting of the changewheel bracket). Two extra gears, 49t and 54t, were available, if required, to further the metric threading range."

    HPC (www.hpcgears.com) do a good selection of steel gears (would need to pick the right DP and bore/bush for the Willson), not that cheap but for short-term you could make the required, either cut 'em (if you're set up for it) or 3D print? Delrin or similar, ally, anything that'd stand up to the load would do.

    Dave H. (the other one)
     
  9. Hood

    Hood If it walks like a duck....

    Messages:
    11,713
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    Look on Practical Machinist form for a guy called Limy Sami, he bought one from a guy I knew, so might be worth a message.
     
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  10. Hood

    Hood If it walks like a duck....

    Messages:
    11,713
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    Ha ha just did a search and I see you have already posted on the thread on practical machinist. As said though a PM to Limy Sami might be worth a go.
     
  11. UNCLE CHUFTY New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Bournemouth, UK
    Cheers for the help boys. I've got the Martin Cleeve book, doesn't really give an answer for what I want. I'd already heard mention of the 49 and 54 tooth extra gears, but me being picky, I was hoping someone might have the info that would would tell me where to find the extra pitches they produce in the screwcutting gearbox, ie. does the missing 1.5mm pitch correspond to the selected 22TPI position on the gearbox for example.
    appreciate you taking the time, I'll crack it in the end, UNCLE CHUFTY
     
  12. ega New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    To cut 1.5mm pitch thread you need to install the 54T and select 18 TPI.
    I'm new here but with a bit of work could probably post my chart showing the settings for the available pitches.
     
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  13. martsrods Member

    Messages:
    66
    Location:
    Solihull
    ^^ That's good information. I don't have the extra gears, I would be interested to know how the extra gears were used (I started this thread).

    Mart.
     
  14. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    9,435
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    You can disengage the half-nuts if you're threading right up to a shoulder, I showed Spencer how to do it yesterday. You do have to reverse the lathe every pass though, re-engaging the nuts to take the carriage back to the start and picking up the same number on the same turn every time.
     
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  15. Scruffywelder

    Scruffywelder Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Dumfries & Galloway
  16. grim_d

    grim_d Unlikeable idiot.

    Messages:
    2,881
    Location:
    Scotland - Ayrshire
    That's literally minutes from me. And at worth a gamble money.

    How to move it...
     
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  17. Scruffywelder

    Scruffywelder Member

    Messages:
    423
    Location:
    Dumfries & Galloway
    [subliminal whisper]
    Buy me!
    Buy me!
    Buy me!
    Buy me!
    Buy me!
    Buy me!
    Buy me!
    [\subliminal whisper]
     
  18. cheb Member

    Messages:
    1,001
    Location:
    Outer Hebrides
    Somebody has.
     
  19. grim_d

    grim_d Unlikeable idiot.

    Messages:
    2,881
    Location:
    Scotland - Ayrshire
    :D
     
  20. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    You have something to impart? :whistle:
     
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