R-Tech mig 180 penetration on 3mm

  1. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

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    2,071
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    I worked with a company called GEA Air exchangers back in the 80’s, they made giant cooling radiators for power stations. These consisted of hundred of 1” finned cooling tubes welded into 18” diameter round end boxes. The brought in specialist welders to tig weld the huge nest of tubings, that were so closely places it was impossible to even see where they needed welding.

    Row after row went in, welded as they were installed, using a variety of real oddball shaped hand sets, and when pressure tested to some astronomical pressure they never had a leak, not once. If they did have it would have meant basically tearing dozens of tubes out to effect repairs.

    Those welders were on £100 a day, back in the 70’s. :o I was on about £25 a week as an apprentice.

    My part of the company closed down in 1987, I got laid off, but the cooling company is still there, called something like Spirogills now.
     
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  2. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

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    2,071
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    Maybe so, if it were actually a weld, with a place for the weld to go into. Laying weld on a flat plate there is nowhere for the melted wire to go, other than build up on the surface.
     
  3. tom2207 Member

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    1,604
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    uk northern ireland
    then dont feed in so much wire ,, and it wont build up a cap as much ,,, its about moving the puddle , not building mountains ,, but thats the practice bit . its very easy to build Toblerone shape caps , thats not really what welding is about as far as i know . maybe different if your facing bucket teeth etc but thats getting specialised .
     
  4. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

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    See what you mean now, I guess if he is just practising puddle control then there will be minimal buildup.

    I must admit I can never usually see the puddle when I’m welding. :ashamed: More like point and squirt and see what comes out. :D
     
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  5. Ideally you do not want the weld to penetrate right through the plate when it is just a bead on plate run
     
    tigan likes this.
  6. tom2207 Member

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    1,604
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    I think the guy is just practising , playing with set up on a new machine , so nice to see what can and cant be done .. hence I suggested a few burn throughs just for the sound and feel etc .
     
    tigan likes this.
  7. Oh, OK matey
     
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  8. tom2207 Member

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    1,604
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    uk northern ireland
    No prob ,, At least thats my take on the original post ,,
     
  9. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

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    Location:
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    Maybe it is just me, but when welding I like to be able to hear it. I did some welding on a tube cooler at work once, plugging a leaking pipe, in the engine room, and I was totally thrown that I couldn't hear a thing with ear plugs in and engines roaring, most disorientating.

    I'm not any sort of a pro welder, just do home hobby stuff, build cars etc.
     
    tom2207 likes this.
  10. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

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    2,704
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    london
    Yup....the only exception might be if I was welding in a kitchen....and bacon was being fried :laughing:

    If I can't hear it then I can't tell if the welder is setup right....well maybe that's just me and I haven't got enough experience. The sound is what I go by....the appearance only really comes at the end and by then it's too late if it's not gone well!
     
  11. tigan Member

    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    doncaster
    OK, tried a few different settings but found that power 3.5 (same as before), and wire feed 4.5 (was 5.5), seemed a lot better.

    I tried it on a joint and seemed ok (in my newbie eyes), even did a vertical down which seemed to go better than i thought it would.

    I left a gap the size of the wire on the joint, wasnt really sure if thats what you do, or butt it together with no gap. (Saw a reply earlier about "the wire has no where to go when its just on top of the metal")

    doing "e"s or "u"s seemed to broaden and sink the weld in more (i guess its more time in one area adding heat), it also seemed to help with timing to get into a rhythm.

    I still struggle to see where im going, would a spot light on the work make much difference - i thought the arc would brighten in up enough.

    Even grinded the joint back with a flap-disk in excitement =D

    Thanks for the comments, ill get there.

    day5_1.JPG day5_2.JPG day5_3.JPG day5_5.JPG day5_6.JPG day5_8.JPG
     
  12. Dadweld New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Location:
    Goring, Oxfordshire
    You should butt weld two pieces of that same material together, leaving a small gap between them and see your results. Watch for the edges melting. On the thinner material (I haven't tried 3 mm yet), you won't be able to weld continuously, but in single momentary spurts.
    If your welding mask allows (which mine doesn't always), you can see this happening. It's all about tying it out on some test pieces first but you have to see what you're doing with the pointy bit and adjusting settings accordingly. I'm going to try a fixed dark lens next as my auto-darkening device isn't reliable.
     
    tigan likes this.
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