Pine Tables - Wax or Varnish

  1. Turbo Member

    Messages:
    3,195
    Location:
    Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
    I bought this nest of pine tables last week.

    P1030884.JPG P1030886.JPG

    I'm guessing they came from a closed down factory as the wood hasn't had its final sanding and there is no finish on the wood.
    Plan is to sand them smooth then apply a finish but I'm not sure what to use.

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    I have these at my disposal plus some gloss polyurethane varnish. The hard wax oil is for floors and leaves a tough but dull finish.
    I also have beeswax, linseed oil & turpentine so I could make up my own furniture wax. The tables will be in regular use so I'm not sure if this would be durable enough.

    What would you folks advise?
     
  2. cumbriasteve

    cumbriasteve Moderator

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    Cumbria UK
    Personally I don't like varnish unless there is no risk of the item being marked, it looks nice when first done and makes cleaning easy due to the totally sealed surface but once marked involves more work to restore to a match.
     
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  3. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark If in doubt ask. Same rules for everyone

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    A Padded Cell.
    A decent bee's wax.
     
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  4. chunkolini

    chunkolini celebrity artiste

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    Swansea
    Danish Oil
    I apply umpteen coats to my own furmiture and three if Im selling it. Gives a lovely satin finish, easy and quick to apply. You can effectively choose how shiny you want it.
    Rub down with 120 grit then go over with 180. Once oiled a very gentle rub down with 240 grit gives a lovely finish.
    Really shows off the grain.
     
  5. David2002 New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Nottinghamshire
    Danish oil or Liberon finishing oil every time. Waterproof if four or five thin coats are applied with a cloth. Put a hot cup down on a waxed pine top and it will leave a ring mark
     
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  6. TechnicAl

    TechnicAl Member

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    6,543
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    Rotherham
    Thats what I do. I do quite a lot of refurbishing old stuff. I paint the bottom and sand and wax the top...220 grit then rub in the wax, leave it an hour and polish off......If im that way inclined I might do that 3 times....feels like silk.
    Only use varnish if its outside........Danish oil is really a thin Matt / Silk finish varnish that will need about 6 coats applied with a rag....I think its good for work tops but I dont use it for furniture much.
     
  7. mpats

    mpats Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,012
    Aberdeen
    I mainly use Danish oil for finishing wood, unless it's something thats being painted or going outside. I've found it goes on pretty easily and a couple of applications is usually enough.
    That said, most of the stuff I do on the lathe, bowls etc. are waxed.
     
  8. Turbo Member

    Messages:
    3,195
    Location:
    Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
    Thanks for the replies. :thumbup:

    Looks like the general opinion is not varnish but either wax or Danish oil.

    That 'Hard Wax Oil' I have is similar to the danish oil so I might go with that unless I find a jar of Danish oil somewhere.
     
  9. Turbo Member

    Messages:
    3,195
    Location:
    Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
    The plan after dinner tonight was to brew up some home made wax & try some out on some scrap wood but I got a bit distracted.

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    First of all I spotted some apple turnovers in the kitchen so a brew was needed.

    Then I noticed that my feet were sore because I was wearing my spare boots, my good boots had been cleaned but needed dubbin put on.

    P1030893.JPG

    Didn't realise how bad they were until I had 1 boot done! :ashamed:

    Eventually I got the gear out & started up my polish brew.

    P1030895.JPG

    I melted 50g of beeswax pellets, added 50g of boiled linseed oil, 25g of pure turpentine & 25g of white spirit. The white spirit is cheaper than turps but the 50% turps will hide the smell of the WS (I hope).
    Once the mixture cooled it looked a bit too soft, I'll leave it overnight to see if it sets. The recipe I saw called for 50ml of the liquids which is less than 50g so I might have to add more wax to thicken the mix. :dontknow:

    I didn't find any Danish oil but I have 2 tins of Teak oil but I don't think it's suitable for light coloured woods like pine. :(
     
  10. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

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    4,133
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    If you use shellac, put a drop of mineral oil in as it stops the alcohol from flash evaporating on contact with the wood
     
  11. tlovatt Member

    Messages:
    1,019
    Rugby, UK
    I use a modern lacquer - heat resistant, can be made satin through to a gloss similar to french polish, goes on easily and dries quickly. I normally use Fiddes with a separate catalyst, fantastic stuff.
     
  12. Kent

    Kent Member

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    10,002
    Location:
    Bowland, Lanacshire,UK
    Sanding sealer rub smooth again with fine grades then wax.
     
  13. brightspark

    brightspark Member

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    yarm
    hard wax oil .even better if u already have it . give it a coat let dry then a rub over with fine steel wool wipe clean then another coat of wax oil :)
     
  14. Kent

    Kent Member

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    10,002
    Location:
    Bowland, Lanacshire,UK
    Here is one I prepared earlier. DSC_2062.JPG
     
  15. Turbo Member

    Messages:
    3,195
    Location:
    Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
    I bought some Danish oil today (it's not cheap!) and I'll do a test with all the finishes to see what I like best. :thumbup:
     
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  16. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    8,635
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    Love Danish on hardwood. Never tried it on pine. Pics please.
     
  17. chunkolini

    chunkolini celebrity artiste

    Messages:
    8,563
    Location:
    Swansea
    Not cheap but it goes a long way.
    First up sand the wood with 120 grit, then again with 180. Then a quick wipe over with a cloth damp with white spirit.
    Brush the first coat on generously and wipe off excess. do that twice and rub down very gently with 240 grit and do it a few times more.
    The more the better.
    Eventually run your hand over the surface and you hear a hiss.
    Ok I'm fussy.
    But it's worth the effort
     
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  18. mpats

    mpats Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,012
    Aberdeen
    I'll try to remember when I get home to take a pic of some pine sleepers I used to make a coffee table, finished in danish oil, they came up quite nicely.
     
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