Nyloc nuts for trailer suspension components

  1. Sean Another 602 fan

    Messages:
    1,094
    Edinburgh
    the M12 nylocks on the steering rack of my cars are like new after 36 years despite heat from the nearby exhaust and getting oil soaked at various times over their abused life

    Should see you out mate.
     
  2. monky harris Member

    Messages:
    625
    Location:
    northampton nn5
    I've read that nyloc nut won't tighten up properly ,
    to the settings on a torque wrench ,
    as the nylon affects the amount of force needed...
    True or false..?
     
  3. skotl

    skotl Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,451
    Location:
    Edinburgh, UK
    Thanks for all the replies, folks - I am now officially reassured :D

    Also, just to reiterate that the picture in the first post isn't my suspension - it's just the first google image I stumbled across that largely looked like mine. Mine is fixed at the front with moving shackles at the back (and no hydraulic damper) so much more standard!
     
  4. pedrobedro

    pedrobedro Man at Matalan

    Messages:
    9,810
    Location:
    CX Derbyshire
    I think it's to counteract the torque as they try to twist the axle under power.
     
  5. rtbcomp

    rtbcomp Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    18,615
    Location:
    Sheffield UK
    Some torque settings are for oiled threads, some for dry so it seems reasonable any resistance will add to the torque required. If the torque specified is for a Nyloc nut then any resistance will have been taken into account.
     
  6. Onoff Member

    Messages:
    673
    Location:
    Sevenoaks, UK
    Back in the day we used to have grief putting M16 A2 stainless nylocs onto M16 A2 studding. Copper or aluminium slip wasn't really used. One trick was to use A4 nylocs which seemed better and not to seize so much.
     
  7. Onoff Member

    Messages:
    673
    Location:
    Sevenoaks, UK
    If you want a suspension component that won't come undone then follow the method that Ford seemed to have used on my MK1 Focus estate:

    1) Ensure all components still have the mill scale on.
    2) Point a can of the cheapest, £ shop black paint at it. Optional whether you take the lid off.
    3) Ensure all bolts are grease/anti-seize free
    4) Lubricate thoroughly with a paste made from 99% road salt.

    Jobs a good 'un. They're going nowhere.

    If you plan on working on one then aside from h.duty tight fitting sockets, a BFO breaker bar and an Irwin nut remover set, stock up on gas and slitting discs.

    This is assuming you can tell which is the nut and which is the bolt head!

    The Golf GTI I've got from the same year is streets ahead on thought and quality. (Imo it doesn't handle as well).

    :)
     
    Farside, monky harris and skotl like this.
  8. skotl

    skotl Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,451
    Location:
    Edinburgh, UK
    To be honest, points #1 through #4 were already part of the plan, so I think we've got it covered :D
     
    monky harris likes this.
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