Newbie about to embark on a Land Rover resto

  1. Domdom Member

    Messages:
    105
    Location:
    UK, Warwickshire
    So, thought I'd join up and see what this is all about. It's been years since I welded anything, and back then it was all stick really unless you were loaded. Did some fabrication work for Compair back in the early 80's and was reasonably proficient with a stick welder, well, I didn't get any re-work thrown back at me anyway.
    So, bought an old Defender needing a few chassis repairs. Not bad enough to warrant a new chassis though. Did a load of research by lurking on here and also various reviews on Youtube etc, and I stumped up for an R-Tech IGBT Mig 180 with a few extras. Got a hobbyweld bottle, automatic mask, gauntlets, apron and some steely boots. Now just need to learn to use it all. I like the fact it can do the MMA so if I turn out to be crap at MIG I can revert to stick. Initially set up with 0.8 wire and it does seem smooth on some 3mm angle iron I had laying around. Hard to get the settings right though, still aiming for that bacon sizzling sound but the welds have stood up to a 4lb club hammer assault. Decent penetration and stronger than the steel itself. Managed to start a tear in the steel during the strength tests, but the welds held up just fine.
    Looking at the LR chassis it seems to be 2.5mm steel so the 180a rating ought to be enough. I will run the welder off a 16a commando socket as well to get the full power available.
    Off to the local steel stockholders to grab some sheet for making repair sections, and see if I can raid their scrap bin for some practice material.
    As for the alloy bodywork, well that's another day. Many secondhand parts available though so not overly worried.
    Wish me luck!. Dom.
     
    garethp and eLuSiVeMiTe like this.
  2. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Welcome aboard, Dom. Lots of helpful advice to be had here, you just need to ask.

    For how a Landy can be done, grab a cuppa and search for the thread/posts by Member KimB - she ended up with a beauty! :thumbup:
     
  3. CompoSimmonite Member

    Messages:
    4,277
    Location:
    Werrington, Stoke-on-Trent
    The Land Rover chassis will be 0.5mm thick in some areas as they rot from the inside out and first thing you know about it is when hole appears. Use a chipping hammer and beat ten shades out of every part. If sound metal then worse it will do is create a tiny ding however if it dents, or even goes through, then you know that aspect needs attention. Got tee shirt from many Land Rovers so never underestimate how bad a "sound looking" chassis really is.
     
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  4. Wildefalcon Member

    Messages:
    188
    Location:
    Gloucestershire, England
    Every inch. They can go from perfect new paint to rusty dust inside an inch.

    But are mostly easy to fix, especially if you take the body off.

    Then get a good cavity wax and apply liberally.
    I used bilt hambler dynax s50 aerosols, it wicked everywhere, and I think did a good job.
     
    eLuSiVeMiTe likes this.
  5. Domdom Member

    Messages:
    105
    Location:
    UK, Warwickshire
    KimB seems to have trodden the path I’m starting out on LOL. I’ve have Landies for 30 years, but up until now I’ve always used the universal tool to repair them (credit card).
    This one though is for my lad. It will be his first car and we have 2 years to do it. Already got the back body off and been tapping around. I’ve seen worse.
    Assuming this goes OK I’m planning to do another one with a Cummins 6bt engine. Going as old as possible cos the early ones will be tax and mot free in 4 years and it will only be a toy.
    But, gotta get this one done first. Want to make it enjoyable for the pair of us too so the only pressure is having it ready for when he starts driving. He’s trying to figure out how to undo rusted bolts right now :laughing:. Me? Sipping a cold one :thumbup:
     
    eLuSiVeMiTe, slim_boy_fat and Seadog like this.
  6. CompoSimmonite Member

    Messages:
    4,277
    Location:
    Werrington, Stoke-on-Trent
    Engine swop to a Cummins will mean MOT applicable no matter how old as vehicle has to be basically standard to meet exemption requirments.
     
  7. Domdom Member

    Messages:
    105
    Location:
    UK, Warwickshire
    OK, so you’re clairvoyant :clapping:
    One chassis that looked repairable is actually well beyond what I consider to be repairable without a jig and probably 2 outriggers, definitely a rear half chassis and 3 months of my life. :laughing: It also has had some pretty dodgy repairs in the past, some of which I prised off with a screwdriver. Great penetration on those welds then, NOT. Bottom line is every section of it needs attention, rails, outriggers, crossmembers etc and I’m not happy with that level of repair on anything. Yes, I could repair it, yes it would be safe, and yes I would be doing more repairs next year and so on. Can’t be bothered.
    Will be ordering a new galvanised chassis tomorrow.
    Bulkhead isn’t too bad considering the age. That should repair ok. Front wings, bonnet, front doors all ok, rear door like a lace curtain with rust. Inner wings are fine. Roof OK, rear tub a bit crusty though. Axles, brakes etc all ok, free and work well although the gearbox is a bit crunchy. Overall the mechanicals are better than I expected and the chassis is worse, much worse.:laughing:
     
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  8. julianf

    julianf Member

    Messages:
    4,238
    Location:
    devon, uk
    Points system allows engine change before it becomes "radically altered" and no longer applicable for historic vehical exemption.

    If you disagree, please link me to government text supporting your claim?
     
    stuvy and OJCar like this.
  9. eddie49 Member

    I think that the "points system" relates to the decision by the DVLA on what registration number can be retained or issued?
    [ see:
    https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-registration/radically-altered-vehicles
    ]
    For Mot exemption, from this text on the gov.uk website:
    https://www.gov.uk/government/publi...emption-criteria#substantial-changes-criteria

    This statement suggests that a swap from 4 to 6 cyl is a substantial change, which would cancel MoT exemption:

    Engine
    Alternative cubic capacities of the same basic engine and alternative original equipment engines are not considered to be a substantial change.
    If the number of cylinders in an engine is different from the original it’s likely to be, but not necessarily, the case that the current engine is not alternative original equipment.
     
  10. julianf

    julianf Member

    Messages:
    4,238
    Location:
    devon, uk
    That's interesting for me, and I had not seen that text previously.

    All I can say is that my own historic class vehical has an engine with a different number of cylinders and a different capacity. I made written statement of this to the DVLA when applying for historic vehical exemption (in my case I had to communicate with them to an extent) and there was never any further quizzing on the engine.


    I wonder how they make these choices. It's maybe a bit more subjective than possibly should be.
     
  11. Domdom Member

    Messages:
    105
    Location:
    UK, Warwickshire
    That has been my experience in the past. That was a Series 2 I bought, originally a 4 cylinder diesel converted to a V8 petrol. Still qualified as exempt as it was pre 1972.

    Also, those links provided by Eddie49 relate to registering a vehicle I think, not changing a vehicle which is already registered. Under the points scheme they decide whether to give an age-related plate of a Q plate, but no mention of re-classifying an existing vehicle which already is registered. Or have I read it all wrong. In either case, the 8 points threshold is easy to achieve on a Landy, original chassis design, original suspension, original axles and you're home dry.
     
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