My Capri Project

  1. the snooper

    the snooper getting older by the day

    Messages:
    20,066
    Location:
    Hull UK
    You would be bolting between the ball of the strut and the hatch which will conduct power
     
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  2. cdsmith15

    cdsmith15 Member

    Messages:
    36
    Location:
    Montrose, Scotland
    Thanks. Will give it try.
     
  3. mylesdw

    mylesdw Member

    Messages:
    675
    New Zealand
    Surely that would only work if the hatch is not earthed, which it almost certainly is. The struts are being used for the live feed to the HRW and wiper are they not and bolting between the strut and the hatch would give a dead short to earth.

    If you can't get the OEM struts you may have to fit a flexible wiring connection near the hinges and go into the hatch skin there. I'm pretty sure lots of hatch-backs do it that way so finding suitable rubberware should not be too hard.
     
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  4. the snooper

    the snooper getting older by the day

    Messages:
    20,066
    Location:
    Hull UK
    youre right i only saw one picture with what looked like an earth, my mk3 wasnt wired that way the wiring passed through a rubber boot at the top of the hatch
     
  5. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    1,895
    Location:
    london
    picture.gif Could you redo the wiring and put an insulated contact between the boot lid and somewhere near the locking mechanism ...you would need to pass some wires through the lid....basically a contact which works when the lid is closed...am thinking you'll never need the heated screen when the boot is open?
     
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  6. cdsmith15

    cdsmith15 Member

    Messages:
    36
    Location:
    Montrose, Scotland
    Thanks guys. One of my thoughts initially was the flexible wiring connection;

    The OEM struts did work and I, wrongly, assumed the new ones would. The rear wiper has bigger electrical issues though!

    Although the contact idea is not something I thought of. Seems worth investigating because, as you say, who needs heated rear screens with the boot open.

    This isn't something that will be fixed soon, quite low on the to do list but I will let you know how it goes.
     
  7. cdsmith15

    cdsmith15 Member

    Messages:
    36
    Location:
    Montrose, Scotland
    Fuel Tank Removal

    Back after a long break due to life taking over but decided to take advantage of some time off work to get cracking on it.

    I decided to remove the fuel tank for two reasons. First is to check the general condition and deal with any holes etc. Secondly, there is lots of welding going to be done on the Capri so best just remove one of the biggest hazards to that.

    [​IMG]
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    So, I was faced with a lot of rust as you would expect. The pictures show the bolts that hold the straps on and the sender unit connectors.

    Yes, the bolts snapped. Yes, the connectors practically disintegrated.

    I placed the car jack with wood under the tank to aid removal. With the snapped bolts out the way, the lines and wires freed I started the slow but steady process of lowering the tank. As the filler neck remains in place you have to take it easy and lower it while easing the filler neck out of the tank.

    Although I expect a car that has been sitting for a while to snap it’s bolts it can become quite a shopping list.

    [​IMG]
    This shows where the space where the fuel tank used to be and the filler neck I was talking about. Pretty happy about how it went but lots of work. Maybe be ready in time for the MOT exemptions rules!

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    The removed fuel tank. On initial inspection it looks in good shape, however a huge amount of rust kicking about that will need dealt with before the rust eats it completely.

    [​IMG]
    I stuck my phone inside the tank and took a picture and this is what came out. Quite impressed, unfortunately, or fortunately, that rust you see in the corner is loose rust that fell in while taking the picture.

    I expect a lot of things to break and be rusty but even knowing this, keeping motivation is going to be difficult.

    As always I am always keen to hear your views and suggestions, even if it is a ‘you should’ve done this’ post.

    Although I fix cars up, this is the first project of this scale I have taken on so, like I said, keen to hear how others get on. How to keep motivation and sharing tips and tricks.

    Thanks. And it is body panels next. Yikes.


    On a side note. Having searched the forum to find this thread, I spotted some incredibly helpful threads from optima21, especially since body panels are next. I look forward to reading those threads in full.
     
  8. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    That's one large Molotov cocktail you have in the penultimate pic :scared:

    Keep the updates coming please, I love seeing what others are achieving with resurrecting old cars and machines. :thumbup:
     
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  9. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    1,895
    Location:
    london
    Looking very good...I also had to drop a tank recently...no snapped bolts but it was still quite a job. Mine was made worse by me believing the tank was empty because that was what the fuel gauge said...lesson learned.

    So will you "just" refurb the outside or do some kind of coating on the inside too. Am sure there are a few places you could send it off and it would come back nice and shiny...removes a lot of the fun of course.
     
  10. cdsmith15

    cdsmith15 Member

    Messages:
    36
    Location:
    Montrose, Scotland
    I'll wire brush the outside and check to see if there is any holes or pinholes etc. Then it is not beyond me doing it myself.

    My tank was bone dry thankfully. Didn't fancy messing about with a tank with any amount of fuel sloshing about.
     
  11. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    1,895
    Location:
    london
    Yea me neither...thought mine was empty! In the end I drained it out the bottom before removal...but as I understand it a completely full tank is alot safer than an empty one full of no liquid but plenty of vapours.

    I think you might be able to buy a liquid sealer for the inside but I've never looked into it fully.
     
  12. Cobbler

    Cobbler Codger bodger

    Messages:
    4,369
    Location:
    Gloucestershire UK
    Yes you can, Slosh is the well known one, but there are several available. Never used any of them though. I was tempted when I had a leaky tank on a Vectra, but I could get a new tank for about £100 so went that way instead.
     
  13. Onoff Member

    Messages:
    670
    Location:
    Sevenoaks, UK
    I'm trying to get this 1983 1.6 MK3 Capri Cabaret going at this very moment. Put it in the garage as a "one day" project. Lots of welding required. (Out of shot is a 1983 MK3 2.0S).

    [​IMG]

    Needs must that I need to get it going asap under it's own steam so I can easily move it in and out. This is because I want to get my daily Focus in to do the sill. Fighting the wiring at the mo.

    [​IMG]
     
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  14. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Iirc, Frost do kits for cleaning out and sealing tanks.
     
  15. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    1,895
    Location:
    london
    If the kits are cheapish I'd do it as the work of getting the tank out has already been done...but if everything with the tank feels very solid I might just do the outside too I think. From my limited knowledge I think it forms a fuel proof coating on the inside so you basically end up with a tank liner once it's done it's thing.

    I remember seeing an episode of wheeler dealer where they refurbed an old tank..it might have been the Volvo p1800 but can't be sure. I think they sealed any holes up with lead or braze...something like that.
     
  16. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

    Messages:
    9,357
    Location:
    Towcester
    One of my mates has the 280 Brooklands, D reg I think it is. It's full restored and mint condition.

    He only drives it if it's dry and he knows it's not going to rain
     
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  17. rikrobson

    rikrobson Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Location:
    Perth, Scotland
    hmmm. Yours has more parts attached than mine at the moment
     
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  18. FoxZulu

    FoxZulu Member

    Messages:
    106
    Location:
    London, UK
    POR 15 from Frosts. It is ethanol resistant. I've done a bike tank with it and once it's fully cured nothing will touch it. I experimented with the leftovers and the only way I could remove it was mechanically - grinder - or burning it:flame:
     
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  19. cdsmith15

    cdsmith15 Member

    Messages:
    36
    Location:
    Montrose, Scotland
    I've been on the Frosts website and thought about getting a restore kit from there and ding it myself. But it will wait until after body panel work. Don't want to pay for anything until I get past the body work stage...it might break me!! :laughing:
     
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  20. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    But not, judging by other posts on the forum, UV resistant in time. :dontknow:
     
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