Mig Welding reviews

  1. Mark Phillips New Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    sa48pz
    Advise please. I read a few reviews today on mig welders and the Sealey MightyMig 150 seemed to be a good machine at a reasonable price. I have just read the migwelders buyers guide and I am now not so sure. Are machines like Parweld, GYS and Rtech that much better and worth the extra money? I am planning a restoration of a Land Rover Defender and a Series 3 utility truck.
     
  2. skotl

    skotl Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    7,371
    Location:
    Edinburgh, UK
    Welcome to the forum :waving:

    Yep - it's a reasonable enough machine, as are the parweld, GYS and rtech. The general advice would be to go for gas welding with MIG so, even though the Sealey offers gasless and with-gas, you should seriously consider configuring it for gas (argon mix) or buying another gas-welder.
    That does tend to push the price up a tad...

    A standard question is what you'll use it for, and you've already mentioned a couple of landies - would I be right in thinking that these have aluminium bodies? If so then it's clear you're not looking to weld body panels so the 30A minimum range for the Sealey won't be a problem.
    In which case is it the chassis you're looking to weld? Assuming these are steel then it's a case of finding a MIG that fits your budget. You probably need a decent bit of oomph (fancy name for max power rating) to weld the chassis so a 150A unit might be the minimum you should look at.

    But... going beyond 150A needs a 16A minimum, 32A ideal 230V single phase feed.

    Do you have a budget, and do you also need to buy PPE (personal protective equipment) out of that money?
     
    Rannsachair likes this.
  3. Rannsachair

    Rannsachair Forum Supporter

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    1,732
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    Lochgilphead, Argyll, Scotland
    Mark Phillips and addjunkie like this.
  4. Mark Phillips New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    sa48pz

    Thank you for your reply.

    I definitely will be going down the gas route so will upgrade to refillable bottle system. The majority of my welding will be chassis but it would be sensible to have a machine that will cope with bodywork as well.
    I am a retired engineer and its more about value for money and being fit for purpose than budget. I am mindful as well that I may not use it much after these restorations so don't want to spend more than is necessary.
    I am able to instal dedicated 32amp supply. I was under the impression 30 amp min range is adequate for bodywork Is this not the case?

    Regards.
     
  5. skotl

    skotl Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    7,371
    Location:
    Edinburgh, UK
    It's not an area that I have any experience in, other than knowing I routinely blow holes in thin sheet generally :D

    There are definitely techniques to employ to increase the chance of success, even at 30A.

    There's loads of opinions on here (like any forum) on manufacturers and machines and you'll find fans and haters of pretty much every make. The key is aftersales service so it's worth looking at dedicated welder suppliers like rtech and GYS, or at specialist suppliers (even for lower end / priced kit).

    We'd probably recommend you steer clear of ebay suppliers / generic tool suppliers like machine mart and (gulp) Halfords, purely for the lack of after sales support.
     
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