Mig welder on a 24V pure shine invertor?

  1. The Service Men New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    uk
    Hi

    I'm new on this site and would love advice. I am looking at if it's possible to do MIG welding on a 3000w pure shine inverter.

    If it will work on a 24v DC inverter that be better as it's cheaper. In the automotive sector i get asked so many times because am a mobile mechanic, "my vans failed MOT can't get it moved to be fixed without a flat bed van, more hassle than it's worth can you come to me to fix the rott on my van?". I always turn them down but thinking if i can get a MIG welder portable i might have something good here.

    I seen battery powered welders but for £2,500 to expensive seems when battery dies am toasted for a while. If i can get it working on a inverter in my van when the battery gets to power in power get it to kick in my engine so can still run the welder without needing to stop.

    Whats your thoughts

    thanks
    David
     
  2. Spark plug

    Spark plug Member

    Messages:
    3,602
    Location:
    Durham, England
    Even with the most efficient inverter mig, I would expect the inverter to fry.
     
    metalmelt likes this.
  3. MattH

    MattH Member

    Messages:
    3,840
    Location:
    Bristol
    Small engine driven Arc welder is you friend.
     
    James1979 likes this.
  4. voipio Member

    Messages:
    914
    Cambridge, UK
    There have been quite a few posts about using inverter-based generators with welders. The general collective wisdom from those is that a welder up to around 200A will probably need at least a 10kVA genny to cope with the highly varying load. Based on that, at least, a 10,000W inverter might be up to it.
     
  5. zzr1200

    zzr1200 Working at 650 ft on open steel work

    Messages:
    3,837
    Location:
    Glapwell, Chesterfield, Derbyshire.
    I've seen a 180amp run on a 6000 watt 12volt/240volt inverter but it didn't like it very much.

    Now I know this is old school proper welding but what about ace/oxy gas welding.

    Portable depending on bottle size needs no power and quiet, unless you get it badly wrong....and very useful for seized bolts n other bits.
     
    metalmelt and willie.macleod like this.
  6. Jay1st

    Jay1st Member

    Messages:
    105
    Location:
    South West FRANCE
    Kemppi has some mig welders able to run on small generators, like the MiniarcMig 200 evo, and 100 meters of extension cord.
    I dont think you'll get the full 200A more like 50-60% of it.

    Or you can have a look at this system, i was thinking of buying one at some point for when we go trailing offraod

    http://premierpowerwelder.com
     
  7. willie.macleod

    willie.macleod Member

    Messages:
    180
    Location:
    Western Isles, Scotland
    I would think for a mobile mechanic that time saved dealing with troublesome fasteners would make this option a winner with the added bonus of being able to weld when required. Also no need to worry about the electronics frying. I'd add a tub of heat block putty to the order as well for car body repairs.
     
    Mick Annick likes this.
  8. hotponyshoes Member

    Messages:
    2,484
    Location:
    Somerset. Uk
    I don't think you have any chance running a welder from a 3kw inverter.
    I have seen 10kw (claimed) inverters that will not boil a kettle.

    Best bet would be a generator or some extension leads. It's not very often you need welding repairs on a van parked in the middle of nowhere.
    For bodywork repairs youncan normally gaffatape them to get through an mot then take them back to your place.
    Chassis repairs could be done with a small stick welder that will run ok on 100m+ of decent extension lead.
    Gas is another option but check your insurance to see how much extra they will charge you to carry it.
    They might also want a fair bit more to use gas on site/on a car over what they charge for welding cover.
     
    James1979 likes this.
  9. hotponyshoes Member

    Messages:
    2,484
    Location:
    Somerset. Uk
    Actually, if it's a tru 3000w output (not just 3000w peak) then it should run anything that you can run from a normal socket. So a smaller mig might be fine on lower settings. Younwill need a pretty big battery bank though so I expect you will be looking around £1k to set one up..
     
  10. Agroshield Member

    Messages:
    805
    A lot of the utility companies have engine-driven generators on their vans. Some have onboard air compressors too. Maybe this is an avenue worth pursuing.
     
  11. m_c Member

    Messages:
    334
    Location:
    East Lothian
    Ignoring that trying to make money from welding rotten vehicles is rarely something good, a vehicle alternator isn't likely to give you much more than 3-400W at idle, and even at peak output when revving the vehicle hard you might manage to double that under ideal conditions, you'd need a large battery bank to be able to weld for any length of time.

    A generator and small mig welder is probably the most cost efficient way, if you want to be able to weld for any length of time.
     
    James1979 likes this.
  12. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    9,337
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    You haven't got a plastic cat in hell's chance of running a mig on a 3000w 24v-240v inverter IMO.
     
  13. barking mat

    barking mat Barking at Pigeons

    Messages:
    2,957
    Location:
    Brittany, The Arz Valley.
    Generator time.
     
    Jay1st likes this.
  14. HughF

    HughF Member

    Messages:
    5,702
    Location:
    Work: Dorchester, Workshop: Corfe Castle, Wife's place: Frome
    I run my welders (mig/tig/stick) regularly off my 3kW Outback power VFX3048E inverter, backed by 10kWh of LiFePo4 cells.

    I'd buy a hobart trek180 if I could find one cheap enough on eBay

    No problem at all. In fact this inverter powers the house/workshop, all the mills, lathes, hydraulic presses, everything...
     
  15. Jay1st

    Jay1st Member

    Messages:
    105
    Location:
    South West FRANCE

    3KW only ???
     
  16. Munkul

    Munkul Member

    Messages:
    2,131
    Cumbria, UK
    Only way I'd do it personally would be a minimum 8kva AVR generator, and a decent quality inverter MIG set.

    something like this:

    https://www.energygeneratorsales.co...c-6500-e-avr-815kva65-kw-frame-mounted-petrol

    and this

    https://migtigarc.co.uk/jasic-jm-160c-compact-multi-process-inverter-2875-p.asp


    Not cheap, not particularly powerful either, but at least you know it would get the job done without frying. A better quality machine can get away with a lesser generator, and vice versa... but it all costs good money in the end...
     
  17. hotponyshoes Member

    Messages:
    2,484
    Location:
    Somerset. Uk
    3000va continuous rated.
    13a RMS, true 50hz stable.

    I have only ever seen them on remote installs or solar banks. They have all been running 48v, I don't know if they have a 24v version?
    I think the price of one of them coupled to 10kw of battery and whatever alternator setup younwould need to charge it is going to be north of the £2.5k the op did not want to spend on a battery welder..:)
     
  18. HughF

    HughF Member

    Messages:
    5,702
    Location:
    Work: Dorchester, Workshop: Corfe Castle, Wife's place: Frome
    They do a vfx3024, not cheap though. They are about 2k per inverter nowadays
     
  19. awemawson Forum Supporter

    At one time there were large output Vehicle alternators that you could directly weld from, don’t know if they are still about but it seems a more efficient way of going about it.
     
  20. HughF

    HughF Member

    Messages:
    5,702
    Location:
    Work: Dorchester, Workshop: Corfe Castle, Wife's place: Frome
    you could quite easily mig weld from a straight alternator with a 14.8v regulator - for bodywork anyway.

    Might need an external regulator and a decent choke to get some resemblance of a CV output at higher voltages (20v or so for .8 wire on 3mm plate)
     
Advertisements