Made a table saw

  1. Ed. Member

    14" Table saw Build.

    Hi guys, I needed a table saw so that I could slice and dice up some timber from the slabs I milled from 3 logs I had, this would enable the timber to dry out faster and give me an idea of how much useable timber I ended up with. Had a 4HP 3 phase motor lying around in the shed and an old aquarium stand as well, so thought that it was about time I did something with them.

    1. Made 2 bearing holders to fit 30mm ID bearings. Bored out some holes in some 80mm round bar, cut them off and welded them to some 10mm plate.

    2. Welded a side plate at 90 degrees, these get bolted down to the frame and hold everything together.

    3. Other side of the bearing holder.

    4. Roughly turned a double pulley out of a larger round bar and turned down one end as that will be where the M10 grub screw locks down the shaft key. After it was cut, it was drilled to size and then the pulley was welded to a piece of 40mm stainless rod. The lot was then machined to make it all true and remove any distortion made by the welding.

    5. I put a thread on the end of the shaft to accept a threaded blade hub, but later on I had to remove that thread and made a new hub (Pic 8.) with straight through hole and a larger flange. Having the thread on the end gave the blade a very slight wobble which at full revs would look normal till I started to cut some timber and then the blade would oscillate dangerously, couldn't work out why till I connected up the VSD to it instead of directly to the power and dropped the speed down to 500 RPM and then I could just barely see the wobble, at full revs the centrifugal force made it all look straight and hid the wobble until I started cutting. Probably from too much tolerance between the male shaft thread and the female hub thread. 6. Shaft assembled (showing the old hub).

    7. Making the new hub. Drilled some steel rod, welded it to some plate, cut the corners off and attached it to the shaft, put the whole lot in the lathe, used a steady rest on the bearing and machined the lot true. there is a M14 x 1.5mm bolt which clamps the blade to the shaft and hub plus a M10 grub screw, no more wobbles.

    8. Plasma cut out a slot in some 5mm plate to fit a M14 x 1.5mm bolt which clamps the frame to the right blade depth.

    9. Plasma cut out some 3mm plate to make the lower blade cover/dust collector, added some 3mm x 25mm flat bar for the sides and added a piece of 40m tube for the extractor hose to clamp to. Originally this was going to be a 12" saw, so I made the frame to suit but with the drama I had with the blade wobbling I ended up getting an old 14" blade to see if it was a faulty blade (which it wasn't) I then figured I might as well make it to accept 12" and 14" blades, which also meant I had to take out some bits from the sides to make it fit. The larger blades come close but there is still enough clearance. (just).

    10. Added a strut for lift assistance when raising or lowering the frame, with the 4hp motor added the frame weighs approx. 60Kg so awkward to lift even when the other end is pivoted, the strut makes the lifting job easy.

    More pics in next post
    1. Making the bearing holders 1 IMG_0568.jpg 1. Making the bearing holders 1 IMG_0568.jpg 2. Bearing holder with side support welded IMG_0576 - Copy.jpg 3. Bearing mount IMG_0572.jpg 4. Cutting  the twin pulley for the top shaft IMG_0583.jpg 5. Welded the pulley to shaft and rough shaping it up IMG_0565.jpg 6. Top shaft assembled IMG_0579.jpg 7. New blade hub IMG_0775.jpg 8. Depth adjustment locking plate with nut IMG_0778.jpg 9. Bottom blade cover with hose attachment IMG_0784.jpg 10. Lifting strut IMG_0798.jpg 1. Making the bearing holders 1 IMG_0568.jpg 2. Bearing holder with side support welded IMG_0576 - Copy.jpg 3. Bearing mount IMG_0572.jpg 4. Cutting  the twin pulley for the top shaft IMG_0583.jpg 5. Welded the pulley to shaft and rough shaping it up IMG_0565.jpg 6. Top shaft assembled IMG_0579.jpg 7. New blade hub IMG_0775.jpg 8. Depth adjustment locking plate with nut IMG_0778.jpg 9. Bottom blade cover with hose attachment IMG_0784.jpg 10. Lifting strut IMG_0798.jpg
     
  2. Ed. Member

    11. Added a "micro adjustment" setup, 13mm threaded rod welded to a pivoting top, a turned, threaded and knurled round bit of rod for accurate height ajustment with a locking nut to keep the setting, the knurled adjustment is grabbed by a piece of slotted flat bar which had the flats twisted in and ground out to fit the top of it.

    12. Welded some 1" SHS tube on either side of the blade to the frame body to support the top plate which stops the 3mm top plate from sagging/bending near the blade.

    13. Oiled both the underneath of the top plate and the top of the frame body and then applied liberal amounts of silicon adhesive between the two to make a seal so that the top plate doesn't vibrate in operation. As the frame was an old aquarium stand which I turned sideways and added some legs, the fit between the plate and the frame wasn't perfect and doing this way would allow me to remove the top plate if neccessary at a later stage, otherwise the silicon would have glued it down forever, there are 4 (1/4") bolts on the sides holding the top down as well.Made a fence out of some 50mm x 25mm x 2mm Aluminium RHS with some bolts welded to some angle underneath and going through the fence. As the bolts get tightened the angle grabs
    the underneath frame and locks it in place.


    I have also made a 91cm x 230cm extension table for it for when I cut long pieces of timber but I don't have pics of it just yet. Still to do/make is to cut down the riving blade, make a sliding fence for the saw which will be able to do angles, make a router holder and fence, but I will post those pics up at a later stage after completion.

    Cheers

    Ed. 11. Micro adjustment and locking nut IMG_0782.jpg 12. Top shaft with pulleys, blade and tube supports both side of blade IMG_0783.jpg 13. Saw table with top 3mm plate, fence and riving blade IMG_0806.jpg 11. Micro adjustment and locking nut IMG_0782.jpg 12. Top shaft with pulleys, blade and tube supports both side of blade IMG_0783.jpg 13. Saw table with top 3mm plate, fence and riving blade IMG_0806.jpg
     
    Maker likes this.
  3. octo0072000

    octo0072000 Member

    Messages:
    5,010
    Location:
    south yorks
    nice bit of kit well made 4hp saw
     
  4. bigegg

    bigegg I drink and I know things. Its what I do.

    Messages:
    4,732
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire
    *PLEASE* put a guard on it.
    not neccesarily to stop you putting your hands through it, put to stop bits flying towards you as you're cutting.
     
  5. Ed. Member

    Actually I have already started to make one for it but don't have pics yet as it isn't finished and forgot to mention it. I have ordered a 2 HP dust extractor which will connect to the bottom blade cover/dust collector and the top one as well. This one will be adjustable vertically and horizontally from the side.
    It still a work in progress.

    Cheers

    Ed.
     
  6. What did you use to mill your logs?
     
  7. Shox Dr

    Shox Dr Chief Engineer to Carlos Fandango

    Messages:
    12,648
    Location:
    East Yorkshire
    I like the Gas Strut.
     
  8. Ed. Member

    I made an "Alaskan style mill". I thought that I put the build up here on this forum but apparently not, so here is a link to it as I am not home at the moment so don't have access to my files:

    http://www.homemadetools.net/forum/alaskan-style-slabbing-mill-5344

    Originally I used a 5yr old Chinese made 62cc chainsaw with 20" bar to power it but the pull starter died, then used a 76cc with 24" bar Chinese version from the same company but the oiler stopped working after 15 minutes and was too hard to start, so sent that one back and now have a Husqvarna 71cc 372XPG with a 28" bar and external oilier at the end of the bar, so that will be what I will use from now on, as I have another 6 Eucalyptus logs to slab.

    Cheers

    Ed.
     
  9. MattF

    MattF Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    9,327
    Location:
    South Yorkshire, England
    Nice bit of kit. :)
     
  10. Ed. Member

    Table with extension added IMG_0819.jpg Added the removable extension table to the back of the table saw today, this will enable me to rip lengths of about 2.4m long. In the top of the picture behind the bamboo you can see some more logs waiting to be slabbed. Still working on the blade cover/dust collector.
     
  11. fixerupper

    fixerupper Member

    Messages:
    1,327
    Location:
    Crete Greece
    Very nice tool , you need a heafty push stick for those logs ....Is that an emergency phone on the left in case it nicks you? :laughing:...jeff...
     
  12. Ed. Member

    Thanks fixerupper, nah! that is the 3 phase VSD , ( variable speed drive ) which was connected to my wood lathe, it controls the speed of the motor, didn't have it on originally but had heaps of dramas earlier on with the blade oscillating when cutting timber and couldn't work out why, so disconnected the VSD from the lathe and attached to the saw, dropped the RPM's to 500 and then could see a very slight wobble, the blade holder wasn't 100% straight do to the thread having to much tolerance, couldn't see it at full revs when wired directly to power. Removed the thread off the main shaft and machined another blade hub with a straight through hole. It now also provides a quick shut down when I hit the emergency switch so will use it from now on, the board also has the correct sized circuit breaker for the motor, another emergency stop and main switch.

    Speaking of push sticks, must make a couple of proper ones up, so far I have been using bits of scrap timber .

    Cheers

    Ed.
     
  13. lchris21

    lchris21 Member

    Messages:
    1,030
    Location:
    South Wales
    awesome.....
     
  14. Ed. Member

    Finished off the blade/dust cover today.
    Pic.15 Roughly cut out the shape out of 3mm steel sheet and the back out of 50mm x 8mm Flat bar. Except I stuffed up and tacked the 100mm SS tube on the wrong side of the plate, didn't notice it till it was all welded up and then had to cut that side and the tube off and reweld.
    Pic 16. Left side of cover with 4mm Polycarbonate plastic sheet bolted to the frame on both sides, this enables me to see both side of the blade when it's working.
    Pic. 17. Right side of the cover.
    Pic. 18. A simple Y junction with 100mm tube and a 40mm side tube for the bottom guard.
    The two hoses get connected to it and then a single 100mm extraction hose connects the lot to the 2HP extractor.

    This cover is fully adjustable, the bar holding it is 20mm solid bar. 15. Blade-dust cover cut out IMG_0831.jpg 16. Blade-Dust cover left side IMG_0838.jpg 17. Blade-dust cover right sideIMG_0839.jpg 18. Y joint IMG_0836.jpg
     
    caveman and octo0072000 like this.
  15. Ed. Member

    Hi Guys, well I finally made a video of it working.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=64e4y...ature=youtu.be

    Just a short video of my home made 3 phase table saw cutting wood, with the 2.4m extension table attached.

    First piece of timber to be ripped was a 2.3m lemon scented gum tree 120+mm high and the second is a piece of Camphor Laural about the same height but much easier to cut than the gum tree. It has a 4HP motor, 4060RPM unloaded spindle speed, 350mm 24 tooth blade. The blade guard is set a bit high as every piece I cut before was a different height so just left it at that height, which resulted in a bit of sawdust escaping. Apart from that it worked out OK.

    I had to redo the bearings on it, the cheapo bearings I put in originally self destructed after about 5 hours cutting, so I ended up with putting in a set of 30mm ID pillow blocks, and so far after another 5 hours cutting these ones are working well with the running temps up to 55-60C which is well within the normal range. Only thing that I don't like about them is that they need to be greased occasionally.
     
  16. Shox Dr

    Shox Dr Chief Engineer to Carlos Fandango

    Messages:
    12,648
    Location:
    East Yorkshire
    Nice saw Ed. That will give you many years of use. Is joinery your main line of work
     
  17. Ed. Member

    Thanks Shox Dr. Actually metal work is my main interest amongst others, not really my work as I have retired now so these are just hobbies, but every 10 or so years I need a change from making metal splinters/welding to making sawdust. Keeps the old grey cells ticking over with renewed vigor!

    Cheers

    Ed.
     
  18. mfletch

    mfletch Member

    Messages:
    430
    Location:
    Mansfield
    Very nice I. Made one smaller than that and did not make the bearings

    The hardest bit for me was getting a straight cut but I welded a 400mm length of angle to the fence at right angle to the blade this made it a lot more accurate and usable
     
  19. Frank Ortiz Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Denver, Colorado
    Very nice
     
  20. armalites Member

    Messages:
    3,065
    Herefordshire
    That's some cracking machining,welding and fabrication there. I'm sure you've put a few hours into that.
     
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