Little help please..

  1. RiPz Member

    Messages:
    4
    i'm restoring a classic Mini, doing it all myself, borrowed a clarke 100E Mk2 mig welder from a friend and got to work..

    when i got the welder it had 0.6mm wire in it, and it would quite often slip on the drive wheel, i carried on regardless, and compensated for the slipping, got used to it, and came out with some nice welds... now.. i ran out of the 0.6mm wire.. so i bought 0.8mm.. now here's the problem..

    the 0.8m wire doesnt slip at all, but the actual welds are going. odd.. its not arcing as i weld.. its arcing on first contact.. but then its just melting the wire.. just making it glow cherry red, rather than arcing all the way along... i know it shouldnt be doing this but just wondered what the solution would be.. more power, more wire speed, less wire speed, less power, what... i'm a novice really when it comes to these things :D

    Thanks

    RiPz
     
  2. malcolm

    malcolm & Clementine the Cat

    Messages:
    9,134
    Location:
    Bedford UK
    Welcome to the forum RiPz,

    The wire burning away would either be due to the wire speed being too low, or the power being too high. I'd try the wire speed first then mess with the power (to increase penetration or stop it blowing holes).

    Normally when you increase the power to weld thicker plate you will also need to increase the wire speed. I often practice off the car on some scrap to get the settings right before welding.

    The drive wheel for the wire should have a groove it in that is sized to suit the wire thickness. Normally the wheel is reversable with one groove for 0.6mm wire and another for 0.8mm wire. If the 0.6mm wire was slipping then it's possible that it was running on the 0.8mm groove - in which case 0.8mm wire would sort the problem. It's worth checking which groove you are using- I'd imagine using the 0.6 groove on 0.8mm wire could also cause wire feed problems.

    What year is the Mini?
     
  3. RiPz Member

    Messages:
    4
    both grooves on the wheel did the same on the 0.6 wire, one looked smaller until it was used for about meter of wire then it started doing ths same - perhaps the 0.6mm groove has been used on 0.8mm wire in the past and its worn the groove out ?

    its a 1992 mayfair, i've got the majority of the welding done, just got one rear arch to patch up and then the underside of the sill needs welding to the floor pan (cant do that until the back end is done because i cant put the rear subframe back in yet)...

    i've tried fiddling with the power and wire speed, seems fine until i commit to doing it on the car (i'm welding upside down in an arch) at which point the wire just comes splurting out of the mig tip like a liquid, i dont know what to do.. i've been told the clarke 100E mk2 should handle 0.8mm wire quite easily so... i'm stuck
     
  4. malcolm

    malcolm & Clementine the Cat

    Messages:
    9,134
    Location:
    Bedford UK
    0.8mm wire should wirk fine in the Clarke 100E.

    One thing I've found with working upside down is that you have to increase the wire speed even further.

    I've had a similar thing happen a few times - and it's always been down to wire feed issues. I wonder if your wire could be sticking. The brass tip on the welder (where the wire comes out) can be damaged if the wire burns back. As soon as you start to weld it gan get hot then grip the wire. Try changing the tip. They only cost about £1.

    Try unclipping the tensioner on the wire feed wheel and drawing the wire through by hand. Do you feel any roughness or snagging? Open the side and look at what the wire is doing as you squeeze the trigger (careful not to arc against anything).
     
  5. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,343
    Somerset
    Get onto your Supplier Malc, he should be supplying you copper ones, for about 30p each!!! :lol:

    As for the overhead welding, yes up your wire a little, and it may help to turn the current down a notch.

    Another VERY common yet very simple problem, try keeping the torch as straight as possible, often gets a slight kink when underneath things, a lower end welder will struggle to push the wire around the bend.
     
  6. malcolm

    malcolm & Clementine the Cat

    Messages:
    9,134
    Location:
    Bedford UK
    You use those cheap copper ones? :lol:

    On a more serious note, A lot of hobby welding machines (including mine) tend to be stored in damp garages and used infrequently. Rust on the wire can wear away at the cord which doesn't help wire feed. Again, keeping the cord straight will help in this situation.
     
  7. RiPz Member

    Messages:
    4
    just been told that the welder is 15-20 years old :x
     
  8. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,343
    Somerset

    Did they even have electric then?? let alone elctric welders... :wink:
     
  9. RiPz Member

    Messages:
    4
    you will be pleased to know, i sorted it :)

    i had the wire speed way to high, and the power slightly high..
    put the power at max 1 (just above the middle)

    and the wire speed at 2 of 10.. sorted it, even good for welding upside down :D

    thanks for your help guys - welding is all in the setup, seems i suck at that bit - hehe
     
  10. malcolm

    malcolm & Clementine the Cat

    Messages:
    9,134
    Location:
    Bedford UK
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