intelligent Helmet

  1. saeid mokhtari New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    canada
    Hello
    I'm Saeed

    my colleagues and I are working on a startup idea, which is engaged in the design and production of an Augmented-Reality-based welding helmet. I try to explain the idea for you: A helmet with an external camera and an internal LCD display, the welder just watch through the helmet's display(there is not any direct vision through the helmet), the system shows you the welding area clearly and it adjusts the light intelligently to enhance vision quality in any situation(welding or non-welding periods) and it displays the welding parameters (such as welding machine voltage and current), welding zone temperature and also alarm the detected defects, it may enable you to control welding parameters remotely too.

    To find out more about our potential customers and the market, we are seeking some information about the actual situation and will be really thankful if you can guide us about them, your answers will extremely help us through our way and can lead us to the right destination.

    Hint: It isn't necessary to answer all questions entirely, give us any opinion you have.



    1- Does it matter to you to know the exact preheat and interpass temperatures at the time of welding?

    2- How do you measure the temperature now?

    3- Does it matter to you to be able to control the welding machine remotely?

    4- How often do you recognize a welding defect by visual inspection during the welding?

    5- How much do you think that the ability to know the exact temperature and control the welding machine remotely can help you in reducing welding time/ increasing the weld quality?


    Your answers and guidance are highly appreciated and we are honored to show our appreciation by offering you a free trial of our product whenever it is ready for the market.

    Thanks for your time and consideration in advance.


    Best Regards,

    Saeed Mokhtari

    https://helios-helmet.com/



    s.mokhtari.homami@gmail.com
     
  2. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    2,503
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    as long as its under 200 dollars , will stand being dropped , kicked , filled with metal dust ., have a built in magnified view and show the internet on long runs , and work off a battery that you can get at the garage , and will still be light and small including the forced air system ,,, Im in .
    Failing that , its a bit like inventing an artificial appendix.
    Sorry , but the sort of welding that this would be used on is done by robots.
    But that aside , welcome to the forum.
     
    ronan, Maker, James1979 and 3 others like this.
  3. Shox Dr

    Shox Dr Chief Engineer to Carlos Fandango

    Messages:
    16,028
    Location:
    East Yorkshire
    Often wondered when viewing screen and cameras and thermal imaging would be used in helmets. Makes a lot of sense. But not for 200quid:vsad:.

    So to answer your questions.
    1 no
    2 no
    3 no
    4 constantly
    5 not very helpful, in my line of work.

    but a Very hi resolution adjustable screen for eyesight/relief, with a thermal imaging hi res camera would sell like Hot cakes.

    I for one would love to test a unit.
    (Optrel pull your finger out) I
     
    Hopefuldave and Parm like this.
  4. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

    Messages:
    3,144
    Location:
    Cumbria
    1- Does it matter to you to know the exact preheat and interpass temperatures at the time of welding?
    Not for most jobs, but for QC on certain materials (duplex stainless if doing it by the book for example) it's important. I imagine it makes more difference on high strength alloy steels too.

    2- How do you measure the temperature now?
    IR gun... but rarely

    3- Does it matter to you to be able to control the welding machine remotely?
    Mostly not needed, but for production TIG welding, my TIG torch remote controls come in really handy. I also have a digital readout on the torch, which is really useful.

    4- How often do you recognize a welding defect by visual inspection during the welding?
    You mean during welding itself, or in-process? Or both? most people will spot surface defects such as undercut, LOF etc if they've been trained to either weld or inspect. Easy.

    5- How much do you think that the ability to know the exact temperature and control the welding machine remotely can help you in reducing welding time/ increasing the weld quality?
    Most weld procedures for austenitic and low carbon steel aren't too fussy for exact temperature, so i don't see it being all that useful. Certainly a cool feature and nice to have, but not a labour saver for my particular workplaces.

    I can imagine a helmet wirelessly linked to your machine, displaying welding amps, voltage and material temp on a heads up display, being a very cool thing to have. If done properly, it would be a control freaks dream.
    Also, if they linked pre heat and interpass temp automatically back to the machine for weld data recording... but anyone using weld data recording probably has control temp monitoring set up already.
     
  5. TechnicAl

    TechnicAl Member

    Messages:
    8,240
    Location:
    Rotherham
    1- Does it matter to you to know the exact preheat and interpass temperatures at the time of welding?
    I imagine that your product would be aimed at high end fabricators so yes it is vitally important.

    2- How do you measure the temperature now?
    I would say the most common method is tempilsticks....fancy electronic stuff tends to break

    3- Does it matter to you to be able to control the welding machine remotely?
    Depends on the process and the joint....TIG it would be helpful....FCAW on pipe would also be helpful


    4- How often do you recognize a welding defect by visual inspection during the welding?
    Hopefully not very often but experienced guys can often tell you where there might be some porosity of slag traps that are not visually obvious after welding, however, I would suspect that the joint would be NDT'd after welding

    5- How much do you think that the ability to know the exact temperature and control the welding machine remotely can help you in reducing welding time/ increasing the weld quality?
    Not much, if any.........heat input is important but that has to be calculated
     
    Parm likes this.
  6. 8ob

    8ob Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,695
    Location:
    moscow on thames
    If these camera`s could zoom in/out they would have a market, would be ideal for those that need glasses.

    Bob
     
    Hopefuldave and Shox Dr like this.
  7. saeid mokhtari New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    canada
    Thanks a lot for your contributions guys.
     
  8. fizzy Member

    Messages:
    6,806
    uk
    I suggest this idea on this forum a year or two ago - I fancied developing it myself but once the Chinese get their hands on it patents are very hard to defend. good luck with your project.
     
    Shox Dr likes this.
  9. bletchmonster

    bletchmonster Member

    Messages:
    488
    Location:
    Cheshire. England.
    Magnification and focus of the weld area would be a big advantage.
    Welder settings and live amperage and volts displayed
    would be a useful tool.
     
  10. hotponyshoes Member

    Messages:
    3,379
    Location:
    Somerset. Uk
    I can see advantages with this,
    Infinity adjustable cheater lense/magnifier.
    The ability to manipulate the image, ie. Have a magnified area for the weld yet also have wide lateral vision of the work area, a bit like the convex edges on the outside of a car mirror.
    Fixed brightness. The optrel autopilot let's you set the shade of the filter, it then keeps this shade level regardless of if you are welding at 25a or 250a. Very handy, if you are working on the side of a lorry outside in bright sunshine you can go under the lorry and carry on welding in darkness without adjusting the shade.
    Cheap outer lense replacement, the camera could be recessed into the front of the helmet to be well protected, lenses could be simple round discs rather than €30 custom items.
    Fully automatic grind mode, the AI could look for a weld arc and only apply shade when necessary.
    Partial shading, like the higher end welding masks you could just dim the arc part of the screen rather than the whole thing. Helps to see where you are going. Could be even better as you could do it at a individual pixel level rather than 1/8 of an adf.
    Real true colour rendition. Would require some image manipulation to compensate for the washout from the arc but should be easy enough
    The ability to remotely view and record the welding process. Feed the output from my helmet accross the internet and directly into an instructor's helmet so he can give me lessons remotely.
    Let the system recognise a barcode on a production part and record the welding (or at least the data) to a production file for quality assurance purposes.
    Obviously this would also integrate into a smartphone app that would show alerts from the phone so I'd not have to take the helmet off all day.

    Downsides:
    You need a camera that will withstand the high levels of uv & ir without washing out the normal colour in off mode.
    You need enough resolution and processing power to match the existing adf's on the market.

    I have a samsung VR headset (came free with a phone). This is basically a helmet shell that you slot the phone into for the display. It has an AR mode that shows the image from the phone's camera on the screen and overlays text etc. onto it.
    2 problems with that mode,
    The sideshift due to the camera position and the lag.
    I could not grab a cup of tea if somebody passed it to me let alone feed tig filler.
    The resolution would be another issue, ok the phone is a year old now but it was a flagship at the time in terms of both camera and screen resolution.
    I have not tried looking at a welding arc with it but I suspect it would not match something like a vegaview 2.5 and certainly not a half decent fixed shade lense.
    I also have a thermal imaging camera but neither the reaction time or the resolution are good enough for welding with on that either.

    Another problem is, where will you sell it?
    The most common welding mask question on most forums is "what's the best mask for under £100?"
    I am sure there are a few internet bloggers who would spend €2000 to get themselves another 500 YouTube hits. Possibly a few welder manufacturers that would to upload footage of the latest pulse process they have developed.
    After that the market is industrial. This means it needs to be air-fed. I know a few people who buy a lot of air-fed masks. There have been a few new companies bringing out air-fed over the last few years and competing on price.
    The big users are still paying the extra for 3m/esab/optrel as the consumables are easily available and they know that batteries/filters will still be available in 5yrs time.

    It needs to be tough.
    The welder using it will not be paying for it so won't be treating it with any respect.
    3yr warranty is pretty much standard now.
    You would need to be making the camera and screen in-house to have effective product development and avoid going bankrupt if you suffered an unpredictable amount of warranty claims. If you buy cheap hardware and make the profit on software development reputation will suffer if line managers are experiencing down time shipping faulty units for repairs.

    Personally most of my welding is sticking stuff together but I have a few guys that weld properly for me and a few bigger companies that I sort stuff out for so answering the questions on that basis:

    #1 Job dependent. Maybe 10% of the work I see requires pre-heat. Out of that, maybe 75% requires accuracy within 50degC or so. The other 25% they want it within 5degC although the actual accuracy they are achieving is questionable.
    #2 Contactless IR thermometer. (Most common but the least reliable I think), paint markers, cheap u-type probes, pre-heat in a temp controlled oven. Waving a blow-torch at it until they "think it's hot enough ".
    #3 Not essential but very useful. My personal use, its handy as my own workshop is cluttered and I have to climb over stuff to get to a welder. Smaller fabrication shops with a varied workload will spend good money on remote control options as the tig welder can be moved away freeing up working space. Large industry, normally have a dedicated machine for each individual weld so they set it and only check it according to quality control schedules.
    #4 I do not make parts to aerospace standards, but the parts I make to be sold do need to be solid and a good standard cosmetically. I visually inspect the parts that are welded for me but either the old boys don't make many mistakes or they correct them as they go as they have a 99% pass rate. If there was a system that would check this for me so I could just arrive, package and ship the parts I would consider investing in it. Within industry, if any defects could be spotted and rectified before the item moves along a production line it would sell well. If the system could replace a human inspection operation even better.
    #5 For small/one-off jobs, not a lot unless you are working in the F1/Aero/etc sectors. For big industry, not a lot as you will run test pieces and then just repeat the same process over & over. For the smaller places like mine where there are probably 30 different products and maybe 10 of those get dropped/replaced annually and they have 2 guys welding using 4 different machines, it could be very useful. If a single order comes in, the guy picks up a box of parts, scans a barcode on the box and the welder gets adjusted automatically it would be very handy. If the welder could then fine-tune his personal settings from the bench and save those to that job even better.

    As the products do change (and so do the welding requirements) I do not spend the money on expensive manufacture specific torches with amp display etc. A system that controlled any welder would be a good investment although hard to implement. A system that showed temp and welding power would be easy enough to add to any machine, there would be a couple of ways of doing it cheaply and would probably be a useful upgrade to the standard welding helmet.
     
  11. 8ob

    8ob Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,695
    Location:
    moscow on thames
    @hotponyshoes Please tell me you copied and pasted that lot, I have read it but think I need to go lay down for a bit :laughing: :scared:

    Bob
     
    Turbo, duncans, Mick Annick and 3 others like this.
  12. hotponyshoes Member

    Messages:
    3,379
    Location:
    Somerset. Uk
    I do waffle sometimes...

    Ref #4, You have not given away any details of how this would work but if you could come up with a proven system to assess and confirm the weld process you could be onto a winner.
    A basic x-ray system will start at £30,000.
    It then needs an operator and a load of health & safety compliance. Replace this with in-process testing, remove any need to re-work products and there is the money maker.

    Ps, I'm hearby claiming intellectual property rights on all these ideas.
     
  13. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

    Messages:
    3,144
    Location:
    Cumbria
    In-process visual examination will never replace x rays or ultrasonic.
     
    Maker and 8ob like this.
  14. hotponyshoes Member

    Messages:
    3,379
    Location:
    Somerset. Uk
    Not in a lot of sectors , no.
    There are places that send random samples out-of-house for NDT or DT and use the results to verify in-house procedures.

    If you had a system that confirmed the weld was carried out to spec after an initial sample passed testing that would be an upgrade for a few places I know.

    In sectors where it would not replace other test methods it may still sell as a checkpoint process to work along side them.
     
    Munkul likes this.
  15. fizzy Member

    Messages:
    6,806
    uk
    I paid over £300 for my Optrel Crystal for hobby use. I reckon under £400 and it would sell very well if done right.
     
    8ob likes this.
  16. hotponyshoes Member

    Messages:
    3,379
    Location:
    Somerset. Uk
    If this was £600 with the features mentioned in the first post would you think about it?
    For £600 how would you expect it to compare optically to a crystal?
    Would you accept a drop in viewing clarity in exchange for the ability to show useful information on the display?
     
  17. fizzy Member

    Messages:
    6,806
    uk
    I would pay 400 but no way 600.
     
  18. Maker

    Maker nEw mEmBeR

    Messages:
    7,882
    Location:
    Don't ask questions
    I think I paid 30 for my helmet but I don't think I'm the target market. :whistle:
     
  19. Robert.

    Robert. Member

    Messages:
    169
    Location:
    South East
    My Esab sentinal with air feed was around the £700 mark once the vat was on . In my line of work all that information and settings would just be something to get smashed or go wrong . It sounds like a helmet for those welders who sit at a bench in a perfectly clean environment welding bits of unobtanium together . I will spend too money for top equipment , but it's gotta be tough and reliable too or I can't justify the risk of the cost .
     
    Turbo and Maker like this.
  20. Turbo Member

    Messages:
    3,846
    Location:
    Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
    As said, the helmet you are suggesting would be for a very small niche market.

    99.9% of welders out there just need a helmet that gives a clear view of the weld, comfortable to wear for a full shift, be quite rugged, cheap & easily available consumables, good fume extraction, a grinding mode & the ability to fit cheater lenses.

    I can't see how it would be economically viable to develop & produce a helmet for that 0.1% of welders just to have the Chinese copy it & sell it for a fraction of the cost. :vsad: Your best bet would be to do the design & some development then sell the idea to Optrel. ;)
     
    Maker likes this.
Advertisements