I bought one! HT200

  1. matt1978

    matt1978 www.lorch.eu

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    3,791
    Location:
    UK, Cannock
    PL1 is always Current, PL2 is always Job selection, PL3 and PL4 are free for operator to choose from a list of functions that include Pulse Freq, Balance , AC freq, up-down slope etc etc pretty much everything that can be adjusted at the machine could be set as a function of PL3 and 4
     
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  2. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    3,145
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    Cumbria
    thanks for that.
    Talking to Fin, that it's an A-torch, not an I-torch, that I've ordered - Express say that's what they usually get for people as most people don't want the added cost and complexity. He's doubtful whether the Powermaster unit will work with an A-series torch... anyone else know any different?

    Anyways, they delivered me my new torch and S/H cooler last night, I'm well pleased with it :)

    New WP20 sized torch (ATW3000, can take up to 320 amps DC!). Had to solder in a connection to make it work with the non-standard water cooler, then after that it was plain sailing. I'm not used to such a small lightweight torch! But the buttons are much more ergonomic than the old style, and the up/down program change improves my productivity and quality by a considerable amount :)

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    And the cooler and machine kinda jury rigged for now... got to finish this batch of legs off before making it to a proper welding cart! It's got a very loud whirr from the pump, it's not obnoxiously loud but I'll try to silence it a bit with accoustic foam.

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    Two other things I noticed... this is the first time I've ever swapped torches on a machine mid job, with no other parameters changed at first...

    1. it runs 10-15 amps "hotter" than the aircooled 26 torch. I had to adjust both my programs down by this amount. Might just be that the old demo torch is worn out and heating up on the cable somewhere? The cooled head shouldn't make it run THAT much more efficiently...

    2. the wp20 gas lens doesn't seem to work half as well as the wp18/26 one... I had to play with my gas flowrate for ages to get somewhere close. It's by no means unacceptable, it's just that i had ideal coverage before, with 100% of my welds coming out silver and gold. Any suggestions? It's just a parweld gas lens.
     
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  3. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    Finally got around to making the trolley properly. Let the pics do the talking.

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    I also packed some neoprene foam into appropriate places around the pump inside, and now the whirr is pretty quiet... overall I'm pretty chuffed with it as the "complete package" :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2019
    Cheesie, 123hotchef, Retired and 5 others like this.
  4. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    @Munkul I admire your workspace, nice and clear of 'clutter' :thumbup:
     
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  5. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    I suppose that's the advantage of only working in there part-time, lol. Plus the other side of the shop is where the clutter is :D

    I do like being able to take time to keep things tidy, though. e.g. every couple of weeks, between jobs, clean down the table top and re-apply a coating of boiled linseed oil. That last pic was taken right after the cleandown on saturday.
     
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  6. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    Location:
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    So since July, I've done a bit of work with this machine. Mostly stainless steel.
    I've been playing around with a bit of aluminium now and again, though, usually padding beads if I'm quiet and just want something to relax me.
    Last night I had a fun little experiment.
    6mm (across flat) treadplate... first a corner weld (for satisfaction) and then the fillet weld... cooled the piece right down to room temp and then ran the back side of the fillet weld.

    Spot the difference in fillet welds... both ran at 200 amps maxed, 25% EP balance, plain AC with a 2.4mm tungsten...
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    there was ONE key variable that I wanted to prove for myself, can you guess what I changed? It made everything run the equivalent of another 30-40 amps hotter, and almost overheated the ceramic cup!
    I can't believe what a difference it made, the pics should speak for themselves though.
     
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  7. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    3,145
    Location:
    Cumbria
    No takers? You boring lot.

    AC Frequency is the answer.

    The first run was done at 60hz.

    The second run was done at 30hz.

    That's all!


    It was something I read or heard recently - can't remember if it was a YT video or weldingtipsandtricks website - they mentioned the arc energy seems to go down with increasing frequency - something to do with more of the up/down and less of the full amplitude. They said it also works the other way - i.e. lower the frequency way down, and you'll have more arc energy.

    So I tried it out, and what do you know... it works. Clearly. Really well. It ran so hot, that turning it down to 180 amps probably would have been better... as it was, I was travelling pretty fast.

    I've always thought that 200 amps was marginal for 1/4" aluminium fillet without a good preheat... but I'm used to welding at 60-90hz, and accepting the limitations of the amperage.

    But this works really well... 30hz will be my go-to frequency for 1/4" fillet welds from now on, and clearly a 200 amp machine is capable of it. Or at least, this machine is :)
    The sound was as you'd expect - a bit harsh - but the arc was stable, didn't wander and didn't crackle. Not sure my previous machine would have been happy at such a low frequency.
     
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  8. Hood

    Hood If it walks like a duck....

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    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    That is something I have said on here and if I recall it was disputed. I have always preferred lower Hz for Aluminium when I wanted to get the heat in and very rarely am I above 70Hz and more often 50Hz.
     
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  9. Hood

    Hood If it walks like a duck....

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    12,584
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
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  10. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    Location:
    Cumbria
    Well, I've certainly found similar to yourself. I suppose one could argue that all I've made is a wider bead, but it's just not the case - the weld pool was sinking as it should, demonstrating decent penetration, and the heat... I was using a plain collet No.5 ceramic WP20 sized and it was glowing slightly by the end of the single short run :D

    It probably comes down to individual machines and how that square waveform is produced, as to the characteristics as you change frequency etc.
     
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  11. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

    Messages:
    10,397
    Location:
    Essex
    Arc Energy is kind of the wrong word.

    Heat input is higher with a lower frequency.

    Arc energy = 60VI / 1000d

    Now, voltage is dependant on arc length, we all know a long arc puts more heat into the piece.

    Current remains constant in TIG.

    d is the distance travelled.

    Heat Input = AE x Process Efficiency.
     
  12. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

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    10,397
    Location:
    Essex
  13. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    3,145
    Location:
    Cumbria
    Ok, maybe not arc energy in those terms. Nothing should change there if it was a true constant current.
    But something changes... and its maybe something to do with the peak times EN and EP stay at for longer, with less zero crossing for a given time period. Because AC isn't a true constant current when you have variables within the waveform.
    It might be something else, possibly the frequency is more efficient at gaining a puddle... i don't know, I'm just saying it was way hotter and easier to puddle :) probably need to do some more testing.
     
  14. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

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    10,397
    Location:
    Essex
    Its well known a lower frequency gives a hotter puddle?

    I don’t see what the issue is.

    You spend more time at EN rather than ramping up and crossing zero.
     
  15. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    Location:
    Cumbria
    Is it? It's not something thats widely talked about, as far as I'm aware. Maybe I've been living under a rock for years?

    I just thought it was cool how noticeable a difference it was, given that 200 amps is barely enough for 1/4" at normal frequencies.
     
  16. Cheesie Member

    Messages:
    223
    Location:
    Lisburn
    Is your table out of 15 or 20mm sheet how's it supported underneath I'm going to make one
     
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