Harrison M250 Restoration

  1. R-D-R Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,135
    Location:
    Derbyshire - England
    Update

    The lathe arrived this morning, huge thanks to Steve AKA LandyLift for providing a very professional service would definitely recommend.

    Anyway here it is, its been stored a long time and needs a really good fettle but having gone over it a bit more I'm generally quite pleased. Main issue with this lathe was the tailstock missing some internal components I have been onto 600 group and seems they have all I need in stock. Spent 10 mins stripping it down and ticking off everything I need. This weekend will involve researching a VFD for it so I can get it running and assess the work thats needed in more detail from there...

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  2. armalites Member

    Messages:
    5,025
    Herefordshire
    I bought an IMO inverter for my ramp, it's in an open barn and inverter has been installed for years with no issues and it often has power to it weeks. They are not the cheapest but they do have good documentation and loads of variables.
     
  3. Carl Wilson Member

    Messages:
    1,732
    Location:
    Moray
    DSC_1399.JPG Your machine is the same type as mine, although mine was the single phase version. Mine has the door over the cabinet alcove which turns it into a cupboard.



    If you look at the tailstock end of the front bed sear you will find the serial number stamped there. DGR Designs have a list on their website allowing you to get an accurate manufacture date for your lathe.

    Your machine looks like it has had a hard life, but it will clean up nicely.
     
  4. R-D-R Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,135
    Location:
    Derbyshire - England
    It’s certainly got a patina, mechanically so far It seems ok. The ways have no dings or visible damage. Travel on everything is light and smooth, there was a slight backlash on the cross slide but a bit of adjustment as per manual helped that.

    Had a peak in the gearbox, gears look in one piece as far as I can see everything moves and changes freely, oils clear. Screw cutting works when manually tested by turning chuck.

    Lots of grime and surface rust which seems to come off ok with a rag and
    Wd40.

    Just need a VFD to get in running and properly assess it.


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  5. Carl Wilson Member

    Messages:
    1,732
    Location:
    Moray
    Very much like my mill, seems to have been sat for many years unused and has ended up covered in grime.

    Underneath all that is a great machine. Shame there isn't a tool post but that's easily put right! There isn't a handle for the large gear selector but you should be able to get one. Alternatively that would make a good screwcutting project.

    Thanks for posting the pictures, I'm looking forward to seeing your progress! I really enjoy seeing and reading about machines being restored. It gives me the inspiration to get on with mine!
     
  6. R-D-R Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,135
    Location:
    Derbyshire - England
    thanks @Carl Wilson

    It came with two tool posts I haven't examined in detail and cant see any identification on them as yet. Will most probably look for a quick change post set. It also came with a Pratt Burnerd 3 jaw chuck, hasn't got a key so don't know its condition other than it looks rusty !

    Heres the posts it came with, not sure of their merits.
     
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  7. R-D-R Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,135
    Location:
    Derbyshire - England
    Spent an hour this afternoon stripping the tailstock further, degreased and cleaned the components double-checking my shopping list for 600 Group as I go along. I have to decide how to tackle the rust thats built up on the inside where the barrel should've been. I don't want to hit it with anything that could cut into or remove the surface so was thinking Electrolysis would be the safest option, grateful for any thoughts? Only problem with Electrolysis is I will end up repainting it which will be a slippery slope towards the whole lathe getting done! its pretty rusty inside on that one end so needs something doing before I fit a brand new barrel.

    Components came up ok using citrus degreaser, fairy liquid and scrubbing brushed

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    rusty end of the tailstock that needs attention

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    other ends ok

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  8. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Member

    Messages:
    12,115
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    Had excellent results with electrolysis and my lathe was in worse condition.
    Doesnt look too bad from the pics though so might get away with some elbow greasr
     
  9. MattF

    MattF Member

    Messages:
    10,272
    Location:
    South Yorkshire, England
    Try paraffin or kerosene with a nylon pan scourer first. Any stubborn bits of rust, either a proper copper 1p or 2p coin, or a piece of copper pipe with the end hammered flat, or even a piece of brazing rod with the end flattened, and then use those as scrapers alongside having at it with the scourer.
     
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  10. Ton-up

    Ton-up Member

    Messages:
    1,590
    Location:
    Essex, England.
    Fine scotchbrite will take that out, doesnt look like its pitted.
     
    Dieselkid 63 and eLuSiVeMiTe like this.
  11. ronan

    ronan Member

    Messages:
    9,923
    dublin
    I like Harrisons, they are a much better machine than colchesters imho. There was a huge Harrison at work and i have to say i liked using it and would be glad to work at another.
     
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  12. Carl Wilson Member

    Messages:
    1,732
    Location:
    Moray
    Agree with what's been said regarding the rust removal on the tailstock barrel.

    My machine has a dickson qctp and I will find out what type it is for you. It was factory fitted. Dickson is part of 600 group too as I understand.

    Fantastic workshop you have.
     
  13. Hopefuldave Intergalactic pot-mender

    Messages:
    1,655
    Location:
    The Shed of Danger, surrey, England
    You could use electrolysis, sacrificial anode inside the tailstock casting stood on end and the "bottom end" sealed off, I've done similar on a bike tank with a bundle of steel rods wrapped in plastic mesh so they didn't short out, worked well enough and didn't affect the paint on the tank - just watch out for bubbles :D

    Dave H. (the other one)
     
  14. R-D-R Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,135
    Location:
    Derbyshire - England
    @Hopefuldave

    Great minds think alike

    I was looking at my electrolysis “bucket” last night and muted the idea of blocking all the holes and filling the cavety of the tail stock to make a self contained internal only process. I use 8mm rebar down the sides of my bucket, I might fashion something to dangle a piece down inside the tailstock and give it a go.
     
  15. Hopefuldave Intergalactic pot-mender

    Messages:
    1,655
    Location:
    The Shed of Danger, surrey, England
    For the small holes, foam earplugs work surprisingly well...

    Dave H. (the other one)
     
  16. R-D-R Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,135
    Location:
    Derbyshire - England
    Hot glued some plastic to one end, looks a bit Heath Robinson but I'll leave it for the afternoon and see what it does. Plan B is the scotchbrite pads.

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  17. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

    Messages:
    4,586
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    By that point they’re all the same to be quite honest.

    The Colchester Bantam VS (or sometimes called the 2000) is simply a rebadged m250.
     
  18. ronan

    ronan Member

    Messages:
    9,923
    dublin
    Never heard horrible headstock noises coming from a Harrisson, like i do most colchesters.
     
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  19. R-D-R Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,135
    Location:
    Derbyshire - England
    Pinched another hour this afternoon to start cleaning the grime off, thought i'd start at the top and work down. There was evidence of a lot of grime between the compound slide and the cross slide so parted them and worked on the compound slide. Just washing up brushes and fairy liquid plus air gun got rid of all the gunk. Hardly any nicks or dings. The Nut is very worn and I may see if I can find a replacement, theres no slop or movement when I move it up and down the screw but not sure my OCD will allow it to be hidden away taunting me. One mishap removing the dial I failed to notice the pesky balls and springs on the diagram and they all shot out when I pulled it, found two but still one missing will sweep up later with the magnetic brush and see if I'm lucky!

    Heres the cleaned parts, not going for a bright showroom standard just want them clean from the thick gunk

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    the questionable nut

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  20. R-D-R Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,135
    Location:
    Derbyshire - England
    Electrolysis worked it came out like new very clean and shiny :clapping: not sure the photo shows it, its wet as i dried it with the air gun and pulled a rag with wd40 on through it.


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    Hopefuldave likes this.
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