h&s question: electrical gs38

  1. bigegg

    bigegg I drink and I know things. Its what I do.

    Messages:
    6,499
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire
    GS38 says that a voltage detector has to have, amongst other things, a max of 4mm of probe tip showing, but preferably 2mm.

    i'm on my mobile (in hospital waiting for mrsegg's results), and cant read a lot of the websites, so:

    is GS38 a standard for tradesmen, or manufacturers?
    does it mean that my older fluke t140 testing unit is illegal to use? or just disparaged?
    if illegal, how illegal? am i likely to get a prohibition notice from hse? kicked offsite by h&s manager?

    basically: as a domestic s/e electrician, am I ok to carry on using it, or should i gumtree it, and buy myself a gs38 compliant one?
    it only cost me £8, so not fussy either way - although i'd prefer not to have to spend £60 on one.
     
  2. WorkshopChris Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,429
    Location:
    South East Essex
    dobbslc and bigegg like this.
  3. J1nx

    J1nx Member

    Messages:
    254
    Location:
    Somerset UK
    I hope it’s just guidance or I’m in trouble :laughing:
     
    mtt.tr and bigegg like this.
  4. bigegg

    bigegg I drink and I know things. Its what I do.

    Messages:
    6,499
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire
    im going to add a couple of layers of heatshrink to reduce the tip length to 4mm, just for safety's sake.
    but its more the legality, for curiosity as much as anything.
     
  5. DAPPH

    DAPPH Member

    Messages:
    1,949
    Location:
    Near to Cross Hands Llanelli SouthWales GB
    What's to stop you shortening them on a grind stone or using an angle grinder on them ?
     
  6. Agroshield Member

    Messages:
    186
    Guidance document by UK HSE http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/priced/gs38.pdf

    Do not be misled by the 'guidance' part of it. In UK H&S law, this term has an implied meaning that is somewhat different to the way a man in the street would understand it.
     
  7. J1nx

    J1nx Member

    Messages:
    254
    Location:
    Somerset UK
    Grinding would remove coating.

    I carry several sets, mostly compliant but some older style when it’s simply not possible to use compliant probes. I often measure things that don’t have the danger potential anyway like sub 120vdc circuits.
     
    mtt.tr likes this.
  8. bigegg

    bigegg I drink and I know things. Its what I do.

    Messages:
    6,499
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire
    i cant read the pdf (i'm on my mobile, in hospital outpatients waiting room, and bored!)

    is it like "you don't *have* to follow the guidance. BUT... if you don't... "

    kind of like when someone walks into your shop and says "you don't HAVE to buy our weekly insurance, but everything looks kind of.... flammable"
     
    J1nx and eLuSiVeMiTe like this.
  9. Spark plug

    Spark plug Member

    Messages:
    3,304
    Location:
    Durham, England
    rtcosic, bigegg and mtt.tr like this.
  10. mtt.tr

    mtt.tr Member

    Messages:
    1,122
    Essex England
  11. bigegg

    bigegg I drink and I know things. Its what I do.

    Messages:
    6,499
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire
    i'm talking about one of these:

    RD528971-01.jpg


    leads are not interchangeable
     
  12. dobbslc

    dobbslc Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,492
    Location:
    Hertfordshire UK
    All my probes have the covers taken off. More than once have I put them into a live terminal with the GS38 compliant covers on and they prevented the tip of the probe from conacting the live terminal thus they would have me thinking it was dead!
    Never again!
     
    zx9, jimbo84, monky harris and 6 others like this.
  13. mtt.tr

    mtt.tr Member

    Messages:
    1,122
    Essex England

    I agree. Rcbos are a good contender
     
    Hopefuldave, bigegg and dobbslc like this.
  14. Kayos

    Kayos Member

    Messages:
    4,828
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Depends on the wording. Should, shall and must all have different and defined legal meanings in documents
     
    Hopefuldave likes this.
  15. Robotstar5

    Robotstar5 Casanunda Staff Member

    Messages:
    17,813
    Location:
    Birmingham
    They look very similar to mine, but can't make out the model number, mine are T140 and have shrouded tips.

    Dsc00571.jpg

    Dsc00572.jpg
     
  16. bigegg

    bigegg I drink and I know things. Its what I do.

    Messages:
    6,499
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire
    mine is a t140. The shrouded tips are missing...
    There's also the issue of whether or not the probes are fused?
     
  17. Robotstar5

    Robotstar5 Casanunda Staff Member

    Messages:
    17,813
    Location:
    Birmingham
    I only used my T140 for basic indication/testing, currently using the Fluke T5-1000 as I found the quick current test function handy at work.
     
    mtt.tr and bigegg like this.
  18. bigegg

    bigegg I drink and I know things. Its what I do.

    Messages:
    6,499
    Location:
    Leeds, West Yorkshire
    that would actually come in handy.
    i have "clamp on ammeter" on my shopping list.
     
  19. Robotstar5

    Robotstar5 Casanunda Staff Member

    Messages:
    17,813
    Location:
    Birmingham
    The T5-1000 gives a reasonable current indication for quick checks, but I find the clampmeter more accurate, depends how accurately you want to measure. Most recent was testing a motor and found the T5-1000 could show up to half an amp difference to my calibrated clampmeter.

    You may need a clampmeter capable of measuring earth leakage current to add to your shopping list at some point.
     
    mtt.tr and bigegg like this.
  20. dobbslc

    dobbslc Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,492
    Location:
    Hertfordshire UK
    A meter that reads milliamps is worth it for fault finding RCD tripping faults,
     
    WorkshopChris and bigegg like this.
Advertisements