Ford Focus MK1 Estate Sills etc

  1. Have a look at my Scorpio repair thread. I imagine that the construction would be vaguely similar.
     
  2. beebee Member

    I often find that fords from this era have wax on the inside of the sill, which is a real fire risk when welding !
    Have a feel though those rust holes inside the sill to see if if feels waxy. If you still want to do it, cut a bigger hole so you can get inside & clean all the wax off !
     
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  3. rikrobson

    rikrobson Member

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    Location:
    Perth, Scotland
    I've not had one catch fire. the wax won't burn that easily but smokes like an Aberdonian hooker.
     
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  4. Onoff Member

    Messages:
    662
    Location:
    Sevenoaks, UK
    Not sure what you mean by these covers? I've seen the step covers, is this something that goes underneath the sill?
     
  5. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    And you would know this........how? :whistle: :D
     
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  6. steveo3002 Member

    Messages:
    5,027
    cambridge uk
    like a textured black side skirt...look at an early focus vs the later ones , early ones have black side skirt /trims over the metal sill
     
  7. rikrobson

    rikrobson Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Location:
    Perth, Scotland
    i'd not worry about covers. i'd just make sure that whatever was put on had a good grip and stopped water ingress. that looks like some sort of thick stone chip that has allowed the water to wick in.
     
  8. Onoff Member

    Messages:
    662
    Location:
    Sevenoaks, UK
    I swear I had to lever it off. It actually came off in a rectangular length with a 1/2" lip on it. Pretty "tough" tbh.

    The oddity is the o/s is far worse than the n/s...
     
  9. rikrobson

    rikrobson Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Location:
    Perth, Scotland
    thats the problem. you should have needed to scrape it off not lever it off
     
  10. Dcal Member

    Messages:
    1,245
    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    If you want to go ahead with this (and I know it's not an economic repair) and if you have the kit and the attitude, it will be great practice for the Capris. Its only worth what you think it is and I despair of the number of cars that get scrapped for the simplest repair. This isn't a simple repair but I would treat it as a massive test piece to get your skills up. How much plate and welding consumables are used getting welders trained and coded? At least your test piece can get you from A to B.
    I did exactly the same repair (also on an estate) for a mate and 2 years and with 200k miles on the clock it's still going strong.
    If you have new sills, expect to see this when you get them off. Cut the sills to leave the spot welds and you can twist the bottom lip off with vice grips, or just drill the spot welds out with a cobalt spot weld drill bit.
    upload_2017-10-15_21-37-9.png


    You could bluff it and just whack the sills on but to do the job right expect to have to patch the inner sill and the even the floor.
    upload_2017-10-15_21-47-7.png

    Just take you time and work from the inside out. You might need to strip the seats and the carpet but that's a half hour job
    When you have all the patching done it should look something like this. I didn't bother with putting the punch outs in the inner sills. Life's too short and I have plenty of projects to practice on, but feel free if you are so inclined.
    upload_2017-10-15_21-33-8.png

    Then put the sills on and check your door shuts and the fit of the wings before welding up.
    upload_2017-10-15_21-48-18.png
    Good luck
     
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  11. Onoff Member

    Messages:
    662
    Location:
    Sevenoaks, UK
    Thanks for that, a great help! A couple of questions:

    1) What primer / paint did you use on those repairs?

    2) Did you paint the inside of the new sill?

    3) Supported on a 2 post (Bradbury?) lift on the suspension points? (BiL has the same lift I think but the working area isn't really suitable for welding / grinding).

    4) Did you have the doors off at any time?

    5) I'm measuring these new sills with a Vernier up at 1mm thickness. Sound about right? They're incredibly light.

    Cheers
     
  12. Cobbler

    Cobbler Codger bodger

    Messages:
    4,358
    Location:
    Gloucestershire UK
    Hi Onoff, no advice for you, just a few words of encouragement. We all know that the job would be uneconomic to do Profesionally, but I'm the same as you, why scrap a car you know to buy one you don't, so I would say give it a go. You say you have the sills already so it's only going to cost time & a bit of gas, as Dcal says, stuff is scrapped for little reason today. So give it a go, good experience, every day a learning day, as they say & good luck with it.
     
  13. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    1,882
    Location:
    london
    I'm in the "just for the fun of it" camp...I'd view the repair as a way of honing your skills. There is no point learning to weld on something that is so expensive you are scared to touch it with the torch...I've always wanted to restore an old Porsche (something from the 1960s maybe)....but I started with a Toyota MR2...and now I'm on to a nissan...all in the ball park of scrap if it all goes badly wrong!

    The above from Dcal looks all to familiar...if you want to see the process of floor and inner sill repair check out my nissan figaro project....I made a brace for the shell but that was because the nissan really didn't seem to be a very strong car to begin with. Otherwise it's just a case of taking your time and working a bit at a time. For me the floor repair has been the most difficult...but I wanted a butt weld instead of a lap and that takes a little more time to get right.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2017
  14. Onoff Member

    Messages:
    662
    Location:
    Sevenoaks, UK
  15. Dcal Member

    Messages:
    1,245
    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    I used Galvafroid on the inner panels but any zinc rich primer will be ok, if it's a good one the tin will feel really heavy.
    This type of paint is really only any use on bare, clean steel and has very low adhesion to most paints and smooth polished steel (like you get with a wire brush in a grinder, although they are great for getting most of the crap off) but will really work on blasted or etched steel. If you give the spots you are welding a good going over with a flap disk and make sure all the wax and grease is removed it will work ok.
    I painted the inside of the sills, I just sanded the most of the sills but anywhere there I was going to weld I took back to shiny steel with a flap disk before painting everything with the Galvafroid.
    Just removing the paint from the welding areas and spraying with spray galv like the tool station one will also work fine if you a waxing the repairs after you are finished, a must in my opinion. Just remember the spray cans have plenty of thinners to make them work so put plenty of coats on and give it time to flash off between coats. (a touch with a hot air gun will speed thing up here)
    I took the doors of to get access while it was on the lift, but it was a simple job to remove them. Just remember to put it all back together and line it up before you weld the sills on and don't cut any more of the inner sills than you need to at one time unless you brace it. So one side at a time and concentrate on an area, weld it up, before moving to the next bit of tin worm.
     
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  16. Onoff Member

    Messages:
    662
    Location:
    Sevenoaks, UK
    SORNed it today!
     
  17. jpmillermatic

    jpmillermatic Member

    Messages:
    776
    USA-NY
    I am in the "save it if you can" camp as well....My Dodge Dakota is not worth much at all...but to replace it would be very expensive even used, a newer truck would be at least 20,000 US for something even half way reliable.

    I have rebuilt so much of the truck at this point....I might as well keep going!


    My passenger side sills are next and they are way worse than the drivers side sill I just fixed.....Im sure there is some floor rot as well as pretty significant inner sill work to do...cab corners....front floor boards, the whole bed......

    ;)

    JP
     
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