Flux Core MIG welding for Automotive Panel work help

  1. Luca King New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Australia, QLD
    Hi there everyone!

    I am beginning the journey of learning how to mig weld, and I am beginning this cool skill on my '79 Corolla wagon project. It just has some panel rust and rust on the lower rad support. Not much, rest is bog work.

    I am just unsure of the route I want to take. I will be doing the welding outside, so I have been advised to use flux core as the shielding gas can get blown away. I am doing this on a shoestring budget, as I am a student, and I was thinking of purchasing this (https://www.edisons.com.au/rossi-130amp-mig-gas-gasless-welder-metal-inert-welding-machine-tool/) welder. Plus renting or purchasing gas in Australia I've found, is incredibly expensive and the car I currently drive does not have room for a bottle. It is gas and gasless, so it gives me the options down the road.

    For panel rust in a jap car with thin sheet metal, is flux core going to work? If so, what type should I use? Are there any places I can go to watch/read automotive specific mig flux welding?

    Any sort of advice or information would be great!

    Cheers,
    Luca
     
  2. Shoggi

    Shoggi Member

    Messages:
    213
    Location:
    Bradford west yorkshire
    That welder in the link is the same as a wolf gasless mig ,
    I made the mistake of buying one (brand new ebay £100 pounds) when I began the long journey of Learning to weld it was rubbish and was told by a few on here not to purchase but I didn't listen @gaz1
     
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  3. eddie49 Member

    For some people, flux-core does work, and they even like it, particularly outside and upside-down, but most find it hot, messy and splattery. There are some Forum members from AUS who may have first-hand advice about gas availability down-under.

    I think that you are rather badly-served in the availability of low-end machines down there. So many of them seem to be over-priced junk. I am fairly sure that the one you linked to has AC output. There's no rectifier, and perhaps no inductor either, it's just a transformer in a box. One of the reviews asks if there is a rectifier. You need to see a close-up of the data plate. Two overlapping circles represent a transformer, a diode symbol in a box is the rectifier, a box with a diagonal slash is an inverter. Ignore the sales blurb, check the minimum current rating on the data plate, e.g. "30 - 135 A". For thin rusty Japanese car tin you need the low rating to be 30A or less. A lot of these low-end machines start at 50 or even 60 Amps. With that heat, plus no rectifier, possibly no inductor, and flux-core wire, you have no chance.
     
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  4. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    1,604
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    Cant add any more to that , I like many have tried it ,, but when I need flux core I go for the external fluxed wire version ,,,,, stick.
     
    Luca King likes this.
  5. Luca King New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Australia, QLD
    Ah, was suspecting so. Do you have any suggestions for affordable good welders down here in Aus or know anyone that might know? Cheers for the advice!
     
  6. Luca King New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Australia, QLD
    ahhh, thats super helpful. Working on a budget is bloody tough. Was close to purchasing this one today, definately a good idea I didnt.
     
  7. Luca King New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Australia, QLD
    Forgot to add pictures of the rust. Oops. These are the worst bits. First image is a small panel section, and the other two are the lower radiator support.
     
    • RustLP.jpg
    • RustLRS.jpg
    • RustLRS1.jpg
  8. eddie49 Member

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  9. eddie49 Member

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  10. Luca King New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Australia, QLD
  11. eddie49 Member

    If you can find available and affordable gas, then when using it outside you would have to increase the flow rate a little ( maybe 10 to 15 litres per minute rather than 8 to 10 ), which would increase your usage.
    In addition, use sheets of plywood as windbreaks to enclose the work area. Might also have to consider a screen to shield any passers-by from the welding arc.
    [ NB ...Using flux core wire, you can take the gas nozzle ( shroud ) off the end of the MIG torch, which gives you a better view of the weld pool. This can be helpful for a beginner. Not a lot of people know that. ]
     
  12. Mark 2

    Mark 2 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    309
    Location:
    London UK
    You can cut a shroud to a shorter length for flux cored. If you leave it off spatter finds its way where you don't want
     
  13. wacky7791

    wacky7791 Member

    Messages:
    167
    Location:
    SEQ australia

    hey mate I live in QLD, for gas find a local speedgas supplier, you buy the first bottle outright then just pay for the refills.

    i use D size from total tools, $300 for the initial bottle then $100 for the refill. did start with C size but went through it too quickly so upgraded it

    https://www.totaltools.com.au/welding-gas-new-argon-5-2-d-size

    as for the welder itself have a look on FB marketplace and gumtree for a second hand unit if you are on a budget thats where I got both of mine.
     
    Luca King likes this.
  14. wacky7791

    wacky7791 Member

    Messages:
    167
    Location:
    SEQ australia
    • Screenshot_20200526-101604_Facebook.jpg
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  15. Luca King New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Australia, QLD
  16. wacky7791

    wacky7791 Member

    Messages:
    167
    Location:
    SEQ australia
    What did you end up buying?
     
  17. Luca King New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Australia, QLD
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  18. wacky7791

    wacky7791 Member

    Messages:
    167
    Location:
    SEQ australia
    good stuff get some pics up of your progress, learning myself on an old 70's ford
     
    Luca King likes this.
  19. Country Joe Argoshield Dark

    Messages:
    1,484
    Location:
    Somerset - United Kingdom
  20. eddie49 Member

    I am sure this is a mistake in the specifications.
    I've no idea why so many of these Chinese manufacturers of inverter welders deprecate their own products by printing misleading information on the data plate. These inverters are basically switch-mode power supplies, with the duty cycle of the PWM circuit that fires the MOSFETs/IGBTs controlled by a potentiometer labelled 0 to 10. I'm sure that if you start welding with the power control set at 0, the current will be about zero.
    [ Even if the spec is correct, you have to bear in mind that these are Chinese Amps, which are much smaller....]
     
    tom2207 likes this.
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