Fillet Welds

  1. LandRoverTom Member

    Messages:
    29
    Location:
    South West GB
    Afternoon all.

    So it's been a while since I picked up a welder but I fianlly got to playing with my R Tech Mig 180 yesterday.
    Straight lines on flat plate went ok (3mm plate)
    Then I tried some fillets - they were more hit and miss. I had the settings as per the R Tech Manual as that seemed a sensible starting place - 3.5 on Voltage and 4.5 on Wire speed.
    Gas was set to 8-10 Ltr per min on the flow meter and the gauge is in the pictures below.

    The biggest problem I seemed to have is gravity - everything seemed to slump to the base of the joint. Any tips on this (or in general about the welds below)?
    Possibly in answer to my own question, the next batch I tried moving the torch a bit faster but that felt a bit rushed so I dropped the dials slightly lower and kept my slower torch movements which seemed a little better (sorry no pics of those).
    Practice is also the other thing I need much more of but any tips before I practice the 'wrong' thing too much?
     
    • Welding (01).jpg
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    • Welding (06).jpg
    • Welding (07).jpg
  2. roofman

    roofman Purveyor of fine English buckets and mops

    Messages:
    7,077
    Location:
    North West
    looks like your wire is a bit fast and up the amps a bit too as they look cold welds matey;)
     
  3. LandRoverTom Member

    Messages:
    29
    Location:
    South West GB
    Ok cool thanks.
    I was half way in the right direction then with lowering the wire feed.
    Just the wrong way with dropping the amps too :doh:

    One thing on the gas - the gauge is marked in l/min which in the pic I have set around 5. Then I've also got a flow meter which is set with the ball bearing up at 8-10 l/min. So am I somehow setting the flow rate twice in that set up? I'm sure I'm missing something obvious that will be embarrasingly clear when it's pointed out. Just that I'm used to a regulator setting pressure - i.e. showing pressure in the cyliner (which mine is) then the reduced pressure after the regulator not flow.
     
  4. roofman

    roofman Purveyor of fine English buckets and mops

    Messages:
    7,077
    Location:
    North West
    flow meters are far better..i normally use 8 to 10 L for all my welding mild steel
     
  5. Your wife feed speed controls your amps so dropping the wire feed will also drop the amps. Looking at the pictures the welds aren’t fusing in at the toes of the fillet, it doesn’t look as if you are getting to much spatter so that is a reasonable indication that the wire feed speed versus voltage balance isn’t a million miles out so I would be tempted to leave the settings as they are for the moment and try increasing your travel speed, don’t weave just point the wire right into the corner and move as steadily as you can
     
    Dcal likes this.
  6. LandRoverTom Member

    Messages:
    29
    Location:
    South West GB
    Thanks. That might also be why I was feeling like I was rushing - I was trying to weave in sort of circular motions. Probably trying to run before walking! I'll stick to a single line and see how I get on with that.

    One thing I was tought (a long time ago doing the very basics) was that with MIG you push the weld pool along. But a lot of the videos I've seen recently seem to be a bit 50:50 on pushing or pulling the weld pool. Is it really critical? Or is it a case of you should push it along but if its less awkward to not then it doesnt affect it too much?

    ps "wife feeds"...?? :thumbup:
     
  7. Ha, ha, “wife speed” well spotted
    Pushing will give the best quality and should always be direction of travel. Don’t get into the habit of weaving, straight runs as fast as you can, You can start fannying around with the Hollywood weaves once you’ve mastered doing it correctly
     
    Sean likes this.
  8. LandRoverTom Member

    Messages:
    29
    Location:
    South West GB
    We'll at least half of what I was tought (or remember at least) was right.
    And that's a bit of a relief in a way, over thinking what I'm trying to do and that 'I should be doing this' when actually, I'm better off sticking so straight runs. A bit less to think about and concentrate on the basics!
     
  9. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    How well can you see? I find it hard to make out the detail of the weld pool etc much of the time, mask isn't much good, plus my eyes are shot. When I take the time to ensure I can actually see, it makes a hell of a difference to weld quality. Sometimes extra lighting is good.
     
    addjunkie likes this.
  10. LandRoverTom Member

    Messages:
    29
    Location:
    South West GB
    Yes at times it was difficult to see the pool. I've only got a cheap mask so that's probably not idea.
    I have a nice LED flood light on a stand that is great most of the time, but I did find it was casing my mask to darken before I'd struck an ark depending on what direction it was shining which was a bit frustrating. and turning the sensitivity down on the mask didn't seem to make much difference either
     
  11. Where are you standing in relation to the weld you are depositing, ideally you need to be looking back down the joint and welding towards yourself so you can see everything that is happening with the weldpool
     
    Morrisman likes this.
  12. LandRoverTom Member

    Messages:
    29
    Location:
    South West GB
    That might also help then. I've been standing behind the torch, working away from myself.
    Although trying to look down on the weld pool as much as possible.
    Sounds obvious now you've mentioned it but at best, the tip of the torch is going to be blocking my view!
     
  13. Absolutely spot on, you need to be able to see the end of the wire. To judge your travel speed keep the tip of the wire right on the front edge of the weld pool, if you go too slow the weldpool will start to run underneath the end of the wire and you won’t get fusion into the parent material
     
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