Esab ok 48.00

  1. Bornfree Member

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    107
    Location:
    England Norfolk
    Been given 7x boxes of esab ok 48.00 4mm rods will these be ok for welding trailer drawbar eyes on ?.I normally use bohler phoenix 6013
     
  2. Paul.

    Paul. Moderator Staff Member

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    Ok48 are a low hydrogen E7018, they should be fine for what you are doing, keep them dry, and run them electrode positive.
     
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  3. metalmelt Member

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    595
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    UK
    I would agree with Paul, and suggest putting them in the oven before use to be sure they are dry.
     
  4. Turbo Member

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    3,856
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    You will also need a welder that can run low hydrogen rods. ;)
     
  5. Bornfree Member

    Messages:
    107
    Location:
    England Norfolk
    i was hoping to use them on site. so it would be with a 250a inverter or my 250a mighty midget which is possibly AC but iam not sure.
     
  6. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    They'll run on any half decent inverter, Parweld. Jasic etc no problem.

    If you're unsure about how they've been stored I'd redry them, it should say on the packs what temp and how long for. A domestic oven goes to 250 deg and this would be good enough for non-code work ;)

    We've put several drawbar eyes on agricultural stuff with low-hys, they're awesome for the job.

    They'll probably run AC ok, but 7018 generally prefers DCEP to run nicely.
     
  7. Jay1st

    Jay1st AdeptusMechanicus wanna be.

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    What's the low hydrogen for ?
    I know nits about stick rods other than hardfacing and " standard all purpose supermarket" rods.
     
  8. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    It's for crack sensitive applications where harder alloy steels would suffer from entrapped hydrogen and resultant cracking... the H4 designation means 4 ml or less of diffusible hydrogen per 100 g of weld metal. It's not all that important for most mild steel applications, but it's more important on very heavy (25mm+ thickness?) weldments and low alloy steels.

    ...but the main reason to use it with standard mild steels IMHO is because it runs beautifully in any position... Seriously, you can happily weld vertical-up and upside-down all day long with only a little bit of skill.
    Its the go-to rod for in-position repairs.

    Problem with it, for code work, is the drying and holding temperature requirements. If you need that H4 designation for the job, then you have to do exactly as the manufacturer says... and not everyone has a proper rod oven or heated quiver.

    https://www.fabricatingandmetalwork...-the-basics-of-low-hydrogen-stick-electrodes/
     
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  9. Jay1st

    Jay1st AdeptusMechanicus wanna be.

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    Damn very sensitive to humidity, here is the most humid place in France mainland, oven them before use and store in an ammo case with silicagel maybe ?

    But if theyre as good as you say i might give a try one day, mind you i only weld as a hobby, not at all my job so no concern about H4
     
  10. Bornfree Member

    Messages:
    107
    Location:
    England Norfolk
    Just googled the mighty midget and apparently its AC but around 500hz
     
  11. Turbo Member

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    3,856
    Location:
    Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
    I can attest to their all position abilities. I could never get a consistent nice vertical up weld until I tried 7018's, now they look nice nearly every time.

    There is a down side with them - they can be a pig to strike the arc with. Scratching the rod end on a file to get a clean end helps plus using them warm from a quiver.
     
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  12. Turbo Member

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    3,856
    Location:
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    On paper my Thermal Arc 150te should run them but they are nearly impossible to get the arc started with it. :vsad: One you start welding they run ok but you need to keep a tight arc otherwise they go out.

    On the other hand my Rtech 180a mig runs them beautifully in mma mode! :dontknow:
     
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  13. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    They need a little bit more arc voltage and OCV to start them, than 6013, which runs on every single MMA source ever made - even car batteries with an alternator ;)

    Ran 7018 on Jasic, Miller, Esab, Lorch, IFL inverters, and Kemppi and Migatronic transformers no problems. They run smoothest on the Miller XMT, and also funnily enough, the IFL fusion, which is a very underrated machine!

    We get into the habit of scratching the half used 7018 on the concrete to remove the glass, then they restrike easily... not best practice though!
     
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  14. Country Joe

    Country Joe Argoshield Dark

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    "IFL fusion, which is a very underrated machine!"

    Quite agree - but then I'm biased, having owned one for years!

    All the Best,
    CJ
     
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  15. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    We borrowed one years ago to do some stainless and I liked it then. There's a shop in carlisle who have had 4 or 5 of them doing 12 shifts most days of the week for the last 6-7 years.
    We got this one given from them to us, broken. IFL took it back, repaired it for under £100, and it's now my brother's machine. Like a Hilti tool almost, seems very plasticy until you see how strong and well designed the case is.
    DC TIG is smooth, duty cycle is awesome, and the stick mode just works perfectly. Zero faff.

    Since then, we looked at one in our workshop at work, but they have changed plastic supplier and the new ones look very shiny, they looks cheaper :( so we went with an Esab instead.
     
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  16. Country Joe

    Country Joe Argoshield Dark

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    Yeah, when I first got mine 10-15 years back from WeldEquip, I was slightly concerned about the longevity aspect, having heard all the horror stories about inverters being so delicate.

    Another thing I thought might happen, was that the "one & only", centrally located, control knob might get knocked off, but a ply transit-case looks after it whenever it's travelling anywhere.

    The only other thing was the shock of the sound when Tig-ing in AC mode - at that point I'd only ever used the DC side of things - which is so peaceful in comparison, with only the hiss of the gas in the background!
    I nearly had a heart attack, there & then!

    Oddly, it seems to get mostly used for MMA, though.

    I've got to admit, I do like my IFL - possibly even more than I'm letting on!

    All the Best,
    CJ
     
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  17. Country Joe

    Country Joe Argoshield Dark

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    1,673
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    Must admit - I hadn't realised the positional advantages of using 7018's - only ever heard about them being trick to strike, or even not being possible on some units with a lower OCV.
    Plus all that extra heating/drying etc, made them sound like "high-maintenance" rods!

    Somehow, I've always just got away with using 6013's - seemingly forever, without ever changing!

    Might have to give them a try on a few verticals, now - and see if they can make me look good!

    All the Best,
    CJ
     
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  18. Bornfree Member

    Messages:
    107
    Location:
    England Norfolk
    Been using these for a while and they do weld nicely but iam getting some porosity in the first inch of welding after that it's fine.
     
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