Drive space

  1. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,953
    Somerset
    As with anywhere these days parking is at a premium. What with people using garages for machine tools, bicycles, heaps of shiny tools... instead of their cars. :whistle:

    I have this space which is already paved, which the wife parks her car kind of half on, half off, which is untidy. Its a squeeze, but her car does (Mini Countryman) fit on there .

    I'm thinking about a dropped kerb along the frontage, and removing the wall of the raised flower bed. Removing the wall would give us a little bit more room, and remove the risk of scrapping cars on it.
    Dropped kerb, removing risk of damaged wheels/tyres.

    As long as the car was reversed onto it the drivers door would open out onto the street- avery quiet dead end with about 20 vehicle movements a day.

    Anyone see any issues with this? Actual minimum sizes for drive spaces- or shall I call it a paved area with dropped kerb.

    With regard to the dropped kerb, its not crossing any pavements, and joins an unclassified road, so pretty certain planning doent come into it... so if i dont need planning, do I need to worry about sizes..?


    *Space looks small in this picture.
     
    • 20190902_180415.jpg
  2. Revs1972

    Revs1972 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,201
    Location:
    Torquay, UK
    Personally, I would just lose the wall and access it by reversing on just in front of the Audi. That way you can avoid contacting the council (and having to pay for) the kerb to be dropped. Do your deeds show the paved area belongs to you ?
    Only saying that as it would appear to be a pavement of sorts running past your driveway, then it continues further up.
     
    slim_boy_fat, Hitch and gaz1 like this.
  3. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,953
    Somerset
    Thats a bit strange that concrete kerb edging, everyones front gardens go right up to the road, but all the drive spaces have the edging. I guess when it was built, the drives were done with the houses, then when the building was complete the road finished upto the drives. Not sure really.
    Ill have to check the deeds.
     
  4. colnerov

    colnerov Member

    Messages:
    3,172
    Location:
    Nr Gatwick UK
    Hi, Be very sure of your boundary. Part of the cost of getting permission for dropped curbs is the legal work to give you the right of way to cross pavements or verges.

    Colin
     
  5. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    6,419
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    The new build house I bought in '89 had grass up to a kerb line but the deeds showed a pathway. We were visiting every few days watching the house go up to find a lamp post stuck in the grass and we had a great deal of hassle having it moved as the Council were adamant that was where it should be so check your boundary. :)
     
    slim_boy_fat and eLuSiVeMiTe like this.
  6. brightspark

    brightspark Member

    Messages:
    26,617
    Location:
    yarm
    if its highways adopted road council will want an approved contractor to carry out the work who is insured. if you do it and some nurd trips on it guess who gets sued :laughing:
     
  7. colnerov

    colnerov Member

    Messages:
    3,172
    Location:
    Nr Gatwick UK
    Different councils have different strategies, some do it themselves, some have approved contractors and some others let you do it your self provided it's done to their specifications.

    Colin
     
    brightspark likes this.
  8. CompoSimmonite Member

    Messages:
    4,167
    Location:
    Werrington, Stoke-on-Trent
    I seem to remember a case in the papers where people had lawns going up to the kerb and then utilities companies started digging up the lawns as they were allowed access to an area equivalent to the width of a footpath as that was still classed as public property.
     
  9. Cobbler

    Cobbler Codger bodger

    Messages:
    4,314
    Location:
    Gloucestershire UK
    A metre strip if recall. Often in the lawns there are marker bricks left showing the boundary, the thing is householders dig them out & deny all knowledge of them
     
  10. pedrobedro

    pedrobedro Man at Matalan

    Messages:
    9,753
    Location:
    CX Derbyshire
    I'd get rid of the wall and plants anyway, they must encourage damp in the front of the building as well as being a pain.
     
  11. colnerov

    colnerov Member

    Messages:
    3,172
    Location:
    Nr Gatwick UK
    Yes, I would replace it with a kerbstone height one at a distance to keep the bodywork from possibly being scraped along the wall.:whistle:
     
  12. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    4,998
    UK London
    Good luck with the plan, unless anyone else has done something similar, I can't see the council giving you the ok. In fact, just by raising the point, you might end up with a warning telling you to stop parking there at all.
     
    eLuSiVeMiTe likes this.
  13. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    1,858
    Location:
    london
    In London we have a minimum garden depth for a dropped kerb...I think it's 4.2m or something like that + any drive has to meet a load of environmental stuff like being permeable etc etc etc.

    I'm with Screwdriver...better to keep your head down than to draw attention to yourself!

    ...and the car can't be in front of the main door in London....the list goes on and on!

    of course if you just knock your garden wall down and park your car in the garden that seems to be OK....but if you try to do it properly it's a load of hassle!
     
  14. colnerov

    colnerov Member

    Messages:
    3,172
    Location:
    Nr Gatwick UK
    I like how the neighbour has planted a tree and fenced right out to the road.:clapping:
     
  15. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,953
    Somerset
    Checked the deeds/plans.
    There isn't any footpath, that finishes about 4/5 metres behind where the picture is taken from. Then its described as single carriageway with service strip of 1metre. That's obviously not been 100% correct since building of the estate, as there is a number of properties with original walls leaving much less than that.

    Every single garden on the estate goes right out to the kerb, bar the ones where the footpath is marked on the plans.

    I think its going to be a knock the wall down, replace the paving and just use it until someone moans.
     
    bigegg, slim_boy_fat, mike os and 2 others like this.
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