drilling hardened steel

  1. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

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    I’ve found things they won’t drill. They tend to chip.
     
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  2. skotl

    skotl Forum Supporter

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    Damn. There's a machine that I didn't even know existed, and now I clearly need to get one!
     
  3. earthman Member

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    1,559
    Like what may I ask? Do you know the rockwell hardness of these things too?

    I have found that they drill through hardened blades with no problems at all, I have experienced one chip out on me after X amount of use though, not sure if that were just down to wear, a fault etc but overall I'd say that my findings of using carbide bits on hardened material is great.:)
     
  4. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

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    10,402
    Location:
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    A bolt that was mega stuck. To be fair I had tried heating it to remove it. God knows how hard it was but it killed a Guhring 10mm TiAlN Coated Carbide Drill. Probably £30-£40 worth of drill.
     
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  5. ronan

    ronan Forum Supporter

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    10,280
    dublin


    Get Yer soldering iron out. Lots of people making them diy. I'd love a wire edm, but no more room at the inn....er shed.

    http://www.homebuiltedmmachines.com


     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2020
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  6. Kram

    Kram Member

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    lotus 30 likes this.
  7. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    I've never, ever had any luck with cobalt drills. Even Presto ones. They just chip.

    I've had better luck with Dormer TiN coated ones... drilling through a hardened sprocket once with a 5mm, the entire drill length was glowing red :D and somehow drilled through... it snapped shortly after that!

    Carbide sounds like the answer, to me. Or EDM.
     
  8. ronan

    ronan Forum Supporter

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    10,280
    dublin
  9. Brad93

    Brad93 M J B Engineering

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    Location:
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    Cobalt does chip I find. I’ve very few cobalt drills. HSS is cheaper, and very tough.
     
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  10. earthman Member

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  11. lotus 30

    lotus 30 classic car enthusiast mostly lotus

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    caldicot south wales uk
    Well i tried it on an old shaft and got a set of drills off a mate did not scratch going to go with @awemawson and spark erode it safest option for me.
    Brilliant response i thank you all very much.
    Andy
     
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  12. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

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    I’ve seen such carbide drill bits displayed at car and bike shows, generating holes in files, other drill bits, stainless disc brakes etc.

    I always thought they were just a scam......:ashamed:
     
  13. tom2207 Member

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    2,522
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    3mm and a flap disc , I certainly wouldnt be stuck for one if i needed one .
    Just checked ,, my 3mm bit is missing ,, Id have to use my 2mm and buff a lot less off it.

    id drill through thee case hardening with the 3mm then use what ever took my fancy its an oil way so it really wont matter what size the majority of the hole is , as long as part of it is 1.6mm .

    Then again , Im not very often stuck for anything .
     
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  14. ronan

    ronan Forum Supporter

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    10,280
    dublin

    Nope, i've drilled out broken HSS taps successfully with carbide. Worth their weight in gold at times.
     
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  15. Kram

    Kram Member

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  16. awemawson Forum Supporter

    Andy's MGA gear shaft arrived and I duly popped a 2mm hole radially to give an oil feed to his wider bearing. Only problem was that the axial hole didn't extend as far down the shaft as he wanted the new hole.

    I stood the shaft upright and popped a 3 mm hole down it's axis deep enough for the new hole. Only problem was that I'd popped the radial hole just deep enough to meet the none existent (at that point) 4.7 mm original bore.

    So I had to set it back up horizontal to deepen the 2 mm hole to join up - so we got there in the end !


    Select-A-2mm-Electrode.jpg
    Set-Up-On-The-Marker.jpg
    Let-Cutting-Commence.jpg

     
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  17. lotus 30

    lotus 30 classic car enthusiast mostly lotus

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    I don't quite no the words i am very grateful to you for doing it for me and great to see the machine in action never seen one before. Although as a apprentice electrician i did see the power of sparks blew up a few screwdrivers all part of learning then i suppose. Many thanks Andrew for going to all that trouble. I am 18 months into this rebuild of a 1956 lotus eleven got a headache today doing the wiring it does take a bit of getting back into.
    IMG_0802.JPG
     
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  18. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    2,522
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    well done ,, even I couldnt have done that with a masonry bit.:thumbup:
     
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  19. My Old Landy

    My Old Landy Melting Metal

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    The power of this forum is fantastic!
     
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  20. lotus 30

    lotus 30 classic car enthusiast mostly lotus

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    You are not kidding got to be the best one on the web andy
     
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