does anyone cut their rods in half ?

  1. tom2207 Member

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    sometimes I do it with braze rods ,, if you chop rods down in length for tig or gas , remember to bendthe last inch over ,,, my old welding instructor showed me that forty years ago , simple habit , easier with gas as you just heat the spot near the end and bend it on the bench ,then spin the rod round for use. It saves you bending down for a look and pushing a rod straight through your eye etc etc.
     
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  2. Windy Miller Semi-Professional Potterer!

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    It also easily identifies which is the hot end!
     
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  3. Feet 'n Inches

    Feet 'n Inches Out of the rat-race at last

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    Didn't quite go to that extreme at the last place I worked but you could guarantee that when you came in the following morning any discarded rods more than about 2 inches long were laid back on your bench.
     
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  4. TechnicAl

    TechnicAl Member

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    Latterly we had to stamp TIG wires both ends because they cut them in half....once stamped they had to cut them in half.....retains the identity
     
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  5. Mark 2

    Mark 2 Forum Supporter

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    I must say that I have never cut any electrodes in half but after reading this I can see advantages. Your running short, you cut them in half and you have twice as many. Bingo:laughing:
     
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  6. tom2207 Member

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    youve missed the obvious here
    if you cut them in half ,
    then weld with half , you always have the second half for when the first half runs out
    so
    start welding with the second half , but before you do , cut it it in half too , when the second half runs out do the same

    that way you always have half of the last rod you used left


    You never ever run out of rods ,,, its total genius .
    one rod could last you all your life , unless some one borrows it , or you loose it.
     
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  7. Turbo Member

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    It also leaves a useful hook on the end of the rod that hooks on the side of the tube of rods when you put it back in, so you can find the part used rod next time! ;)

    When I was taught gas welding we were taught to weld the stub of a filler rod on to the new rod and use it up.
     
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  8. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    I've heard of a tight boss who used to sharpen Stanley blades, but welding mma stubs together, that's a new low
     
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  9. Mikes Member

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    There used to be a clause in a lot of the mechanical services specifications for welding which referred to 'economy of rods'. Don't think anyone ever took any notice of it as when I was learning years ago, I used to pick up all of the part used rods to take home and practice with. Every now and then, a friendly welder would give you some whole ones.
    Isn't striking an arc with a part burned rod all part of the learning necessary to weld? I regularly do this when I'me tacking things together and then use a full rod to do the actual weld. Some think I'm tight but does make a difference when you buy the rods yourself.
    Back in the dark ages, one place I worked at, the boss used to make you cut the outer of a used 7" sanding disc so that you could use the inner on a 4" grinder. Not sure that it was cost effective. Used to be 'fun' until the 'new' disc had worn totally round.
     
  10. mike os

    mike os just a little insane.....

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    only regularly cut tig rods,

    And only cut arc if acces is an issue
     
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  11. Paul.

    Paul. Moderator Staff Member

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    At a place I worked at in the 80's we had a flypress tool for punching them out they were for 4.5" though, the 4" have a smaller hole. It was quite a big shop, the labourer had a regular job collecting up the old 7" and converting them.
     
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  12. KemppiFrog Member

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    I had a guy working for me, always cut them in half, usually in handfulls on the shear. He was a bit of a ****head and his hands shook...
     
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  13. brightspark

    brightspark Member

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    :)probably did good welds weaving with no burn throughs :laughing:
     
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  14. KemppiFrog Member

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    Oi! I often pass the Stanley blade over a stone before use; Saves looking for the spare pack:laughing: Hardly a 'low' point, just being carefull.....

    How do people find these old threads? Esp. from Idaho, where they grow potatos. Maybe lack of space welding up the harvesters?
     
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  15. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of some trades, Master of none

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    One of the weld repair jobs I supervised, we had a well respected coded welding company carry it out, inside a vessel, big ol 1" thick steel paddle cracks to grind out and reweld. Really awkward access.
    Anyway, their welder was using and discarding 7018s like nothing else. Would sometimes use an inch or two of rod, and then stop, grind, and start a new rod every time
    When you think about it, it makes the most sense... for this sort repair work, the very cheapest part of the job was a pack of rods!!! And why would you want to faff about restriking 7018.
     
  16. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    they google it and click on the results then open an old thread up

    same as the discount codes
     
  17. Mikes Member

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    Location:
    Hutton, Essex
    Luxury, we had to do them with tin snips hence they were not quite round.
     
  18. KemppiFrog Member

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    Well, yes, but why look in the first place? OK that was a silly question...:laughing:
     
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  19. KemppiFrog Member

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    Seems I can't use pizzhead, fairy nuff. He dropped in late one night while I was doing a late one and was chatting reasonably, then his eyes glazrd and he passed out going straight back on the hard floor with a nasty bang as his head hit. I really thought it was an A&E urgent job, but he came too and muttered a bit, then wandered off home. Bit later, he told me he had quit, as the medic had given him a few months if he didn't...
     
  20. Robert Mullins Member

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    109
    Location:
    Salisbury, uk
    When we were building HMS Scott, 1996, I had to tack 3 rods together to gain access to a vertical fillet weld, it was murder, a major bulkhead against the shell, fully welded from below the floor plates upto the deckhead, good days, I enjoyed shipbuilding
     
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