Chevy Progress and a question

  1. Lippyp Member

    Messages:
    566
    Lancashire UK
    Cut the rest of the rotten inner sill out yesterday and started fitting the new panel, not a great fit as its slightly too short but it's hidden behind a deep flange so should be fine.

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    I hadn't realised what a time consuming job fitting the new panels is, still not finished on this one and I've got the kick panel patch to fit, a patch to make up on the floor and then the bottom of the door pillar and the outer sill itself.

    My question is: what size holes should I drill for plug welding?
     
  2. malcolm

    malcolm Hej!

    Messages:
    8,827
    Location:
    Bedford UK
    I tend to use about 7mm to 7.5mm holes for plug welding which guarantees I'll strike an arc first against the rear panel rather than the sides of the hole.

    It does take a long time to prepare to a good standard - chopping out all the old rusty stuff and cleaning up. Your prep is looking excellent. Are you going to clean the black paint off the edge of the new panel?

    Do you have door braces fitted to retain the door gap? With the B pillar disconnected at the bottom you might get a lot of movement. A bar tacked tot the front and rear of the door gap that could be ground off later would work.

    Looks like a nice job.
     
  3. Lippyp Member

    Messages:
    566
    Lancashire UK
    No bracing across the door opening but I've been told by those that know in the USA that unless you start chopping off the bracing underneath the floor and the cab mounts there's no need to brace anything as the cabs are so well constructed and suported they just don't move. (they're made of 1.2mm steel as well so nice and thick) I'll put the door back on though before I fit up the outer sill so I can make sure the gaps are right and I can actually shut it.
     
  4. Lippyp Member

    Messages:
    566
    Lancashire UK
    So time for an update, I've been hard at work over the last couple of weeks welding and grinding as I need to get this side finished as I need to move the truck back home as my garage landlords want the space back.

    Floor patch welded in, a few holes still to be fixed, ended up welding them up using a piece of squashed 22mm copper pipe as a backing/heatsink, works well, doesn't stick to the weld and makes it easy to fill small holes.

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    Inner sill clamped up ready for welding complete with hand made curved section at end.

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    Tacked in

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    Fully welded

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    the complicated bit!

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  5. Lippyp Member

    Messages:
    566
    Lancashire UK
    Also welded in the kick panel patch, this was a biatch as its not a hugely accurate pressing and took a full day of fettling to get it vaguely right and for some reason it was a bvgger to weld in, needs some filler on the inside to get a decent finish but its going to be carpeted anyway.

    clamped up:

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    welded in

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    Ground down

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  6. Lippyp Member

    Messages:
    566
    Lancashire UK
    Finally I fitted the door pillar patch today, cut it down to size and fettled it up with hammer and dolly etc, and then seam sealed the back of the kick panel weld and gave the area a couple of coats of primer. Next thing is to weld this panel in, weld a couple of captive nuts on from the old panel, paint it and then rehang the door so I can fit up the outer sill and get the gaps right.

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  7. Lippyp Member

    Messages:
    566
    Lancashire UK
    The weldings all finished now, got the outer sill on today after hanging the door wednesday night (that took a bit of faffing around I can tell you!) and spending yesterday getting a good fit (including having to cut and weld one end to get it close. This was a total **Language** to weld on for some reason, not sure if the welder just didn't want to play, if it was the weather or what but I kept blowing holes in it and then I'd get poor penetration so a couple of welds just popped straight off. Got it done in the end though, just needs a clean up, a little filler sanding off and some seam sealer and paint.

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    I have to say this site has been very useful and supportive, my welding has come on in leaps and bounds.
     
  8. Lippyp Member

    Messages:
    566
    Lancashire UK
    Finished apart from cutting the paint and a polish and waxing the insides. I need to put it back together now, wing, bonnet and cowl (or in American, fender, hood and cowl) and then take it for an MoT soon.

    Primer:

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    Gloss (not bad for a spray can job, the Halfords mixed to order cans have a much better spray pattern than a normal off the shelf can)

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    Still got the other side to do sometime but this was the worst as it would have been an MoT failure straight off. I also have a new carpet set, new dash pad and some audio to go in. On the engine front I have a new tuned aluminium intake manifold and electronic dizzy to go in and a set of period aftermarket aluminium Mickey Thomson valve covers. Plus I'm currently trying to source a brake servo to convert the currently manual drums to power. The wheels are off in the second picture because in between coats of paint I changed the front brake shoes, found that the reason its always piulled to one side is that the previous owner fitted one set of brake shoes the wrong way round as the shoes are non identical depending on whether its the leading or trailing shoe.
     
  9. lexi Member

    Messages:
    1,557
    paisley
    Your having fun mate and getting somewhere with it. Nice truck. What engine?
    Alex
     
  10. Danger Member

    Messages:
    102
    Ontario, Canada
    Lookin good ol chappy. Didn't think the Brits could handle our tough as nails American iron, but you did a great job. Just curious as to the paint you used. Is it just a basic enamel?...and what kind of primer did you use?
     
  11. Lippyp Member

    Messages:
    566
    Lancashire UK
    Its a 350ci (5.7L) small block V8, currently fairly stock apart from a Carter AFB four barrel carb and electric fuel pump, K&N air filter, electric fan and 2 1/2 true dual exhausts running from ramshorn manifolds and possibly a hotter cam than standard according to a drag racing friend. I have an Edelbrock Performer EPS manifold to go on, a standard HEI dizzy and a set of ally M/T valve covers.

    The paint is just a basic cellulose based rattle can over celly white primer. Eventually I'd like to get all the rust sorted out and the whole thing repainted professionally.

    As to American Iron, this is currently sharing workshop space with these:

    1970 (I think) Camaro with a 498ci BBC running on methanol, best time to date 9.38 at 142mph

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    68 427SS Impala, a rolling resto back to original spec

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    Chevy Nova (not sure of year) tubbed, fully caged with a 468ish bbc, again gonna run on methanol.

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    theres a guy up the road with a 2004 Ford Expedition as a daily driver and a 71 Mach One Mustang, another with a 65 C10 truck and another with a mid 50's Chevy truck and theres a few more modern americam motors around. Not bad for a small town in rural Lancashire !
     
  12. Lippyp Member

    Messages:
    566
    Lancashire UK
    Oh and this is my truck before I started tearing it to pieces, the roll bar is coming off and being sold as it looks just wrong. The back may be lowerd a touch too.

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  13. sdyck

    sdyck Member

    Messages:
    8
    Calgary Canada
    Hi Lippyp, looks good. I like those little square clamps you use to hold your patch panel on. But it looks like there must be a T section at the back must be inside the rocker, how do you get it out once welded up? Does it collapse some how and pull through?

    Thanks
     
  14. Danger Member

    Messages:
    102
    Ontario, Canada
    Hay, that rollbar just needs to be 'sectioned' to lower it to the roofline. You'd be amazed at how cool that looks. If you're gonna dump the rollbar anyways, you might wanna think about chopping out a chunk at the base and reweld it. It's the perfect welding project...hehe.
     
  15. Lippyp Member

    Messages:
    566
    Lancashire UK
    The clamps are made/sold by frost restoration in the UK and they are only suitable for use where you can get to both sides of a repair. You simply slide the flat bit between the two pieces of metal to be butt joined, there's a square hole in the end of this flat piece that takes a short length of square bar that sits across the weld line at the back and is pulled tight by the wing nut and thread, this also has the effect of lining up the two pieces of metal perfectly. After tacking simply undo the nut, the bar drops out behind and pull out the clamp. For closed sections such as the rocker I used normal mole grip type clamps.


    As to the roll bar, I have contemplated rewelding it but I'm not set up to weld stainless steel and I'm not sure I like the look of it even if it was inline with the roof.
     
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