Cebora 130 turbo

  1. Steve22 Member

    Messages:
    5
    West Yorkshire UK
    Hi,
    Been given a Cebora 130 turbo to learn to weld with. Are they any good.
    I want to weld on cars and to make some gates from box section, mainly 3mm. Occasionally small amounts of thicker stuff...
    Is it worth persevering with my set or should I upgrade. If so what do you suggest.
    If I upgrade will that held my welding or just give more umph!

    Thanks
    PS I am on single phase, 32a supply.
     
  2. the snooper

    the snooper getting older by the day

    Messages:
    20,160
    Location:
    Hull UK
    the cebora are a good make, they have made them for other companies such a BOC & snap on and probably more
     
  3. keith19 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,346
    Midlands UK
    The Cebora 130 should be fine for car panels and similar stuff. You are approaching its limits, I'd say, at about 3 mm. Taking it slowly and in short runs, it should manage your 3 mm box section, but it's working right at the top of it's range, so don't start a production run.
    For anything thicker than 2.5 - 3 mm up to around 4 - 5 mm, get a 150A model.

    Or do what some of the other guys on here do; anything over about 3 mm, the arc welder comes out. This takes a while to learn, but can be cheap to buy. And it's always fun to learn a new skill.

    A machine with higher amperage output will help your welding on thicker metal, having more in reserve, but only you can improve your technique.
     
  4. jimi_boom Member

    Messages:
    90
    LAncaster
    I have one of these and I think it’s a great little machine I have the 130 turbo.

    I think it’s much better than the Clarke’s of a similar size and personally I can get better welds out of it than I can a Clarke.

    I have used it to re build an old VW Caddy with no problems at all. I too have used it on thicker material and as said above the best thing to do is go steady and give the machine a break as it will get hot quickly even with the fan running full tilt inside the machine.

    I have also been given a euro torch conversion kit for it as well which I am thinking about doing this weekend as the only problem I have found with the machine is that the shrouds are an odd nonstandard size, however you can buy them from the weldequip shop.

    I also feel that the standard torch feels a little flimsy compared to say the Clarke units and if it does break or the gas valve starts to stick in the torch assembly they aren’t that cheap to replace. My gas valve is a little sticky, but a gentle tap soon sorts that out.

    Weldequip shop stocks all the consumables you will need though.
     
  5. Steve22 Member

    Messages:
    5
    West Yorkshire UK
    Thanks for the replies.
    Feedback on the Cebora 130 turbo is good.
    I have a really old Crypton Triangle arc welder. It lays a really nice weld but I really struggle to start the weld as the rod sticks. I had thought that if I got a larger MIG I would only have to master one.
    I guess the advice says persevere with both...
    Steve
     
  6. Cobs Member

    Messages:
    156
    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    If you get any problems with the wire feed motor running erratically take the torch handle to pieces, prise off the black plastic top to the gas valve (careful no to lose the spring) and clean the contacts using either a fine file or emery paper.
     
  7. keith19 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,346
    Midlands UK
    "I have a really old Crypton Triangle arc welder. It lays a really nice weld but I really struggle to start the weld as the rod sticks."

    Steve, I take it you have got that Crypton on the 85v output setting?
    If not, try it. Should light up the rod a lot better on 85v than on 55v, and you can take it up to 3.2 or even 4 mm rods on that setting, if it's the 250A model. A very nice old machine.
     
  8. Steve22 Member

    Messages:
    5
    West Yorkshire UK
    Hi Keith it is the 250A model with the 55v and 85v terminals.
    I have tried it on 85v, my sticks are 2.5mm.
    I am getting better at starting the arc. I read the tutorial on this site and am now using wrist action and holding rod nearer vertical.
    Once I get an arc it is really smooth and lays a very neat bead with great penetration. I think I find it easier and much neater than the MiG. I like it and think it will cope with some heavy duty welds.
    Forgive my ignorance but is this old arc welder DC or AC?

    Cheers,
    Steve
     
  9. keith19 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,346
    Midlands UK
    AC, but nice ac, with a ocv of 55v for heavy and 85v for lighter stuff. Just be careful of welding in damp conditions, it is possible to get quite a jolt off 85v if you accidentally short it out!
     
  10. gavuk

    gavuk artful-bodger

    Messages:
    2,951
    uk wiltshire
    Try warming up the arc rod by striking on a piece of scrap next to your project before starting in earnest .......good luck
     
  11. Steve22 Member

    Messages:
    5
    West Yorkshire UK
    mmm - better watch out for that one!

    Thanks for the warning.
     
  12. Steve22 Member

    Messages:
    5
    West Yorkshire UK
    Do you have to clamp the scrap with the lead or just lay it on your work piece?
    Steve
     
  13. gavuk

    gavuk artful-bodger

    Messages:
    2,951
    uk wiltshire
    hi Steve ,depends on the job...if it can be clamped either vice grips or earth clamp then that is best ,will work by laying on but if it sticks,you will pick up the scrap :laughing: and can leave arc marks on the workpiece if not careful...........I use a piece even on my workbench,no reason why you can't bolt it to the earth clamp :clapping:
     
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