Car panel/thin sheet fitting technique

  1. Paul.

    Paul. Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,575
    Location:
    Northampton. UK
    You could mig that vertical down, much quicker and far less heat in the job than all those spots, and will give a nice flat weld profile so less cleaning up.
     
  2. Shedendman

    Shedendman Member

    Messages:
    4,359
    east sussex
    Same,but i use a 3mm cutting disc
     
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  3. metalmelt Member

    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    UK
    You could Paul but the amount of heat would massively distort the panel and end up with more filler than in Jordans air bags and still not get it flat.

    This is the problem, which is easiest and which causes the most problems and there is no set answer as it depends on individual cases, particularly where a panel is stressed.
     
  4. sjp001 Member

    Messages:
    101
    Location:
    Devon, England
    ^Metalmelt - in case you didn't realise, Paul is a pro. Check out some of the work he has done. Sorry if you realise this.
     
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  5. metalmelt Member

    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    UK
    So am I.

    I also restore classic lorrries as a hobby and the panels are much larger and warp so easily which is why I mentioned it as bodywork is fickle and even professional welders get it wrong with sheet bodywork.
     
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  6. Shedendman

    Shedendman Member

    Messages:
    4,359
    east sussex
    Now thats got my interest;)
     
  7. daleyd

    daleyd Member

    Messages:
    6,909
    Location:
    Wrexham, North Wales
    Oooh, can we look forward to seeing some threads and pictures of your handywork? I hope so...
     
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  8. Paul.

    Paul. Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,575
    Location:
    Northampton. UK
    Just to be clear, I was referring to craig-sm box section not metalmelts panel, long runs on flat panels are asking for trouble with distortion in any position, I've done plenty of such joints, many on stainless with the tig and always use a heat sink where possible, a skip welding technique, and air quenching to quickly remove the heat.

    Sorry for any misunderstanding, I should have quoted the post.

    4.jpg
     
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  9. Craig-SM

    Craig-SM Member

    Messages:
    910
    Location:
    Leeds
    That was 4 pieces of thin 0.9mm sheet metal bent to right angles then spot welded up. Running a continuous bead on previous attempts just warped it. This was all in my practice before tackling the car, in the pic below. The results were good, the spray painting was abysmal though

    5C27A686-A7BE-4D68-BB7A-7A0323311EBE.jpeg
     
  10. Wightsparks

    Wightsparks Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,424
    Location:
    Wight
    I was wondering about a heatsink, I saw a device recently that was a thin-ish copper slipper on a handle to be put behind welds - seems like a good idea if I can create a smooth bit of copper from some pipe or similar.
    Ah - a "welding spoon"
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Panel-Be...541433?hash=item3b4d4693b9:g:WQ4AAOSwQjNW~RHL
    I'm guessing it's not the answer to all blow through or I'd see them in use more often
     
  11. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,424
    Location:
    Staffordshire, England
    I always found a flap disc leaves a slight bulge, when grinding out a weld, unless it is a brand new one, and you go very carefully.

    The cut off disc works well, for taking the ‘hump’ off, as it flexes enough to absorb my clumsy fumblings rather than digging grooves and slices.
     
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  12. droopsnoot

    droopsnoot Member

    I use an old piece of copper pipe to put behind joins that might need help - for example if I've blown through it and need to fill the gap, or near to a panel edge. Not sure it always makes much difference. Plumber nearby throws out lots of old offcuts of heating pipe, so it's easy to grab a load and make the end into the right shape. Also longer lengths are handy for getting access up behind larger panels.
     
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  13. metalmelt Member

    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    UK

    Thanks for the clarification Paul.
     
  14. metalmelt Member

    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    UK
    If you can flatten it out into an oval shape and flatten one end and solder it you have more contact area and you can fill it with water for mpre heat dissipation.
     
  15. metalmelt Member

    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    UK
    Covid allowing you can go one better, you can come to Newark next year and see it in the flesh if they can actually set a date, assuming you mean the AEC Militant.
     
  16. metalmelt Member

    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    UK
    Fire away?
     
  17. daleyd

    daleyd Member

    Messages:
    6,909
    Location:
    Wrexham, North Wales
    Ah, no pics then? That’s a shame :( I’m sure a few people here that can’t get to the show would like to see what you have, but never mind eh...
     
  18. metalmelt Member

    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    UK
    You've been given the chance to go and take as many pictures as you like, but tried to wriggle out of it, no surprise there.
     
  19. Craig-SM

    Craig-SM Member

    Messages:
    910
    Location:
    Leeds
    Calm down lads, put the handbags away.
     
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  20. daleyd

    daleyd Member

    Messages:
    6,909
    Location:
    Wrexham, North Wales
    Not sure why the anger :dontknow:, I only enquired as it seemed something people on here would like to see. I know I always enjoy the car/truck resto threads, but hey ho.:sheep:
     
    Shedendman likes this.
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