Capri Practice Welds

  1. cdsmith15

    cdsmith15 Member

    Messages:
    40
    Location:
    Montrose, Scotland
    I have done a couple of practices on an old Capri door. It is 1mm thick. I ran out of gas during the first practice.
    Got some of the Clarke disposable gas for my second attempt.
    I tack welded then stitch welded between tacks. The line at the bottom of number 2 was just me setting it back to those settings as I feel that was the best of the three?!
    The bottom part of 4 is like that because I missed the join. D'oh.
    Number 3 was me holding the torch for longer than I did in number 2.
    Will keep practicing before going for it for real on the car.
    I have more pictures but wanted to make sure I am uploading them correctly first.
    Cheers for looking and happy to hear any advice on these.
    IMG_20200514_155319.jpg IMG_20200514_155324.jpg IMG_20200514_155329.jpg
     
  2. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    1,552
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    If youve not welded before thats a tough place to start ,, be a lot easier to get some 2mm plate , sort of 2x4 inches , and have a play , get your technique nice and settles and used to your machine mask gloves etc , then work down to older thinner steel ,,, hobby gas bottles are an expensive way to weld .
     
    stuvy likes this.
  3. cdsmith15

    cdsmith15 Member

    Messages:
    40
    Location:
    Montrose, Scotland
    Thanks. I have some little pieces of scrap metal kicking around I could use for that. Cheers.

    I am ony using the disposable gas bottles until D&A opens up again as that is where I get my gas from. Pretty bad timing to run out of gas. So the Carke bottles will have to tide me through till then.
     
  4. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    2,698
    Location:
    london
    Did you clean the back of the steel too?
     
  5. cdsmith15

    cdsmith15 Member

    Messages:
    40
    Location:
    Montrose, Scotland
    I forgot to on 3 and 4 in my haste.
     
  6. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    Your bottles will only last 12 mins and you need 7lpm

    clean it fully back including the earth clamp point

    have a read of the tutorials at the top
     
  7. Craig-SM

    Craig-SM Member

    Messages:
    828
    Location:
    Leeds
    Are you using a cutting or grinding disc?

    I'd ditch the disposable bottles and get a regulator for hobby gas. As others have said make sure you prep it properly. Only do 3-4 stitch welds before moving to far end of the piece to minimise heat build up. You should be able to touch the previous weld without burning yourself before attempting to add any more stitches to it.
     
    stuvy likes this.
  8. Ashley Burton

    Ashley Burton Member

    Messages:
    3,947
    Location:
    Northamptonhire
    Is your gas even on?

    Looks pretty dirty & potentially you are going too fast as the beads don't look very consistent

    Just got to keep practicing

    1mm is a little thin for starting off tbh
     
    stuvy likes this.
  9. cdsmith15

    cdsmith15 Member

    Messages:
    40
    Location:
    Montrose, Scotland
    Thanks.

    On the gas. The only place that sells the Hobbyweld gas locally is closed for lockdown so only using the disposable bottles as I have a weekend off and thought I could get practicing and on to the car.

    I used a cutting disc to take the bits off.

    As far as teh gas goes. I have to wait until the only local supplier opens after lockdown to get some so thought I could just use the Clarke bottles as I had the weekend off.

    Thanks for the tips on stitch welding. I am told this is the best way to avoid warping on a car panel.

    I was wondering if it was too fast. Will keep practicing.

    Thanks all.
     
  10. Al Strachan

    Al Strachan Not Funny

    Messages:
    253
    Location:
    Aberdeenshire
    when you cant see what you are welding you'll never succeed. What mask do you have? I have one of the cheaper automatic ones as do most of us DIYers i would imagine. First thing you need to make sure is that its darkening and lightening quickly (especially for stitch welding) and you can see the workpiece properly when welding and not welding.

    I also get problems with glare inside my helmet due to strong backlighting and sometime wear a cap or hoodie to keep the light out from behind.

    settings, understanding your welder, the behavior of the steel, gas, cleanliness etc etc are all very important, but in my experience, until you can see what you are doing properly, everything else is a waste of time.
     
  11. wacky7791

    wacky7791 Member

    Messages:
    163
    Location:
    SEQ australia
    any pics of the capri?
     
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