Buying a workbench

  1. badabec Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    239
    Location:
    Essex UK
    Hello, my older son, 36, has just moved and now has room for a workbench in his garage. He is in Wales, I'm in Essex, so not really feasible for me to take my welding gear etc down there to build one.

    Has anyone any recommendations for an 'off the peg' workbench? I've already provided the vice, an old Record (not the new, made of cheese type).

    He won't be welding or doing anything fancy, but he needs more than a Workmate.

    As always, the bank of Dad is paying for it, so realistically looking at around £150. Machine Mart do them for about £75, but they look a bit flimsy.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. Arc Tourist

    Arc Tourist Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,579
    Location:
    California & Wales
    Where in Wales is he ?
    Perhaps there is someone on the forum here near by who might chime in to help sort it out ?
     
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  3. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Member

    Messages:
    11,637
    Location:
    Bedfordshire England
    Send a delivery of wood some nails a saw and a hammer :)

    I like wood for benches. Absorbs the impacts well. Stick some plate over it for welding.
     
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  4. GrahamGKD

    GrahamGKD Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,222
    Bournemouth UK
    Depending on size - maybe build one which is part welded and part bolt together (for transportation)??
     
  5. Tangledfeet

    Tangledfeet Once more into the breach...

    Messages:
    1,334
    Location:
    St Andrews, Fife, Scotland
    Ask Dunk Lamont at 7050ps if he could do you a custom (he does them all the time, have a look at his website) folding workbench; something like his standard folding one but without the laser cut slots - should bring the price down. Or maybe just the three holes you'd need for bolting on the Record Vice you said you've provided? (I'm assuming its an engineers vice rather than a woodworking bench vice.)

    https://www.7050ps.com/welding-bench-600x580x6---laser-cut---inc-pp-701-p.asp

    I've got the 800 x 600 and it is very stable and robust, also folds up narrower than the Workmate I just leave outside, and is reassuringly heavy with a 6mm steel top.
     
  6. Ashley Burton

    Ashley Burton Member

    Messages:
    3,970
    Location:
    Northamptonhire
    Yeah timber built one would be my choice!
     
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  7. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,205
    Somerset
    What's he plan on doing with this bench and vice... surely anyone who requires such things would have the basic skills to build their own?!
     
  8. RWD3M

    RWD3M Member

    Messages:
    870
    Location:
    Wiltshire, UK
    And if he doesn't, what a great way to learn! :)
     
  9. Other Daniel

    Other Daniel Member

    Messages:
    52
    Location:
    France, Charente
    Would second that.
    Intended usage would determine what material(s), it's made from.
    As a general purpose goto bench I agree that wood is the material of choice.

    ATB,
    Daniel
     
    eLuSiVeMiTe likes this.
  10. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,071
    Location:
    Staffordshire, England
    Wood and screws, once you know the size of his space. Top is two layers of 18mm OSB, and 1 layer 18mm plywood.
     
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    eLuSiVeMiTe likes this.
  11. Matchless

    Matchless Member

    Messages:
    1,052
    Location:
    Essex UK
    or a solid wood fire door cut down, not the old type with asbestos inside! or a bit of kitchen worktop, he needs to go skip diving,
     
  12. rtcosic

    rtcosic Member

    I've just spent the last couple of hours joining two 2m lengths of 220*75 with loose tenon in mortices to make a workbench for No1 son.
    The faintly amusing aspect is that the wood is offcuts from the reroofing work he did on his house in Cambridge. Too good to throw away says I and sawed them down to length to fit in my car and lugged them home.

    Where they sat for two years.

    Back to Cambridge next weekend.

    Children - don't you love 'em. even when they are 35!
     
  13. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    1,604
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    I blame the parents

    who do you blame ,,, lol

    you will enjoy the time and the project im sure , some days its nice to be the '' old hand''
     
  14. Ashley Burton

    Ashley Burton Member

    Messages:
    3,970
    Location:
    Northamptonhire
    @rtcosic I'm glad I don't rely on my parents

    I personally prefer to get stuck in & learn how to do the job myself
     
  15. arther dailey

    arther dailey Member

    Messages:
    3,988
    Location:
    England
    I hate to say it but hes 36 , let him get on with it I am sure he can manage to make a bench
     
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  16. badabec Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    239
    Location:
    Essex UK
    Hello, thanks for all the suggestions. My son is able, but just needs a push to get him started. I may well end up down there, acting as 'the boy', while he gets on with it.
     
  17. Onoff Member

    Messages:
    1,248
    Location:
    Sevenoaks, UK
    Maybe this stuff skips generations?

    My old man was big on pubs and working men's clubs so most of our "DIY" was done by dubious drinking buddies of his.

    Consequently if I wanted a kennel for the dog I had to build it, ditto a desk for schoolwork or spot lights in my bedroom. I had a reasonable grounding from "woodwork" classes at school.

    My 21 year old now, studying computer science at uni. Knows his way round hand tools reasonably well. Never used a grinder or chopsaw mind. I've made him have a go at welding. Yesterday we sat on the patio with me directing him building a control panel for the electric gates. Really just panel wiring and crimping but gives him an idea.

    Wish I'd done more with him as a little'un!
     
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  18. RWD3M

    RWD3M Member

    Messages:
    870
    Location:
    Wiltshire, UK
    I wonder if you're right here. My grandfather was a proper 'shed guy' and I used to spend a lot of time with him in hes shed. My father really wasn't and neither are either of my two boys. My 6 month old grandaughter however already knows what the handle on the pillar drill is for! :)

    *I'll try and get a pic.
     
  19. Onoff Member

    Messages:
    1,248
    Location:
    Sevenoaks, UK
    They do say you spend more time with your grandchildren than your children! Maybe if I have any I'll get around to finishing the (what started as) a Toylander.

    It's "our" fault creating this generation that "can't" I suppose. Spending those early years working too bloody long and hard & ignoring what really mattered!
     
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  20. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,071
    Location:
    Staffordshire, England
    I only have a daughter, just turned 19, but she has no interest in welding or spannering, or woodwork, or building cars and bikes, so my skill set is going to die with me. :(

    I’m no master craftsmen, but if there were a major disaster, and survivors camps were only allowing people with useful skills in, then I’m sure there would be a slot for me. :D
     
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