Boxford lathe info

  1. Paul 101 New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Newcastle upon tyne UK
    Hi all, im looking a buying this lathe,
    But not sure of the type, some say its a model B, but i think it may be a model c.
    Any info or what to look out for would be much appreciated.
    Many thanks.
     
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  2. Matchless

    Matchless Member

    Messages:
    1,061
    Location:
    Essex UK
    look on lathes.co.uk a whole world of info on there
     
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  3. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    9,340
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    I think it's an old model C. Only thing it's got going for it is the two imperial and one metric threading dials, and the pair of travelling steadies. The lathe itself is a bag of ****, it's the bits that have value.
     
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  4. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,301
    Location:
    NE London - UK
    As said, it's a very old model C. You can find the serial number stamped into the top of the bed by the tailstock. The Lathes.co.uk website has the serial number ranges on it.

    http://www.lathes.co.uk/boxford/page8.html
     
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  5. Paul 101 New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Newcastle upon tyne UK
    Hi pete.
    In your opinion would you say this would be ok, as a first lathe, not looking to do anything fancy with it, max stock size 70mm x 100mm. May be some thread cutting on 10mm rod, never used one since school,
    I know ive missed out on much better ones. But there seems to be a lot of resellers or breakers out there, i have a budget of about 550. I'll understand if you dont want to give an opinion,

    Many thanks

    Paul
     
  6. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,301
    Location:
    NE London - UK
    I wouldn't waste your money on that. It's got no changewheels, so you'll have to buy those if you want to thread cut. The threading dials are starting to fetch silly money. The tailstock is incomplete, from the angle of the centre that's in it I'd say that he quill has been robbed and the centre's there to kid you that it hasn't been taken.

    There are better lathes out there for the money.
     
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  7. Paul 101 New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Newcastle upon tyne UK
    Many thanks, for the advice, i had sort of decided against it, plus my local university is selling off a load of equipment, ready for a demolition and rebuild of the building, but unfortunatly due to covid is closed down and no one available to talk to, so maybe wait until i see what they have Left, when it starts to reopen.

    Many thanks and stay safe

    Paul
     
  8. RichardM Member

    ^^^ get in first, have a trip down and see if there is anyone to talk to, alternative numbers posted up to ring.
     
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  9. Paul 101 New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Newcastle upon tyne UK
    Thanks Richard,
    Im am actualy based on the uni with my job, thats how i knew about the sale, the project has been put on hold for now and the people involved are not at work, and it looks like there is no face to face teaching this year, so not sure when anyone will be back to ask, i can usualy get any machine work done on site, but dont like to ask to often, just fancied trying to relearn machine for a hobby, and didnt realise how popular it is, and how much a 50-60 year old lathe sell for.
    Regards
    Paul
     
  10. Arc Tourist

    Arc Tourist Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,581
    Location:
    California & Wales
    Unless you want a restoration project, I would agree with Seadog and pass on this one. The only bargain to be had seems to be the shipping at £3.70

    Edit: Would suggest you check out the wealth of information about Boxfords on the lathes.co.uk site as previously mentioned. I did this before looking for a suitable lathe for myself, which was an underdrive model with the basic accessories the lathe came with. Rarely nowadays will you find a machine with all the basic accessories as it was sold with, so consider making up a list of what tooling and accessories you must have or need, and their cost; you can then use this as a gage to value the items included when looking at Boxford's for sale. This should give you a good idea of what your investment might be, and if a particular lathe will be a bargain in the long run.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2020
  11. Arc Tourist

    Arc Tourist Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,581
    Location:
    California & Wales
    I just noticed, currently there are a couple of Boxford lathe's on the "gandmtools.co.uk" site which might be of interest to you. One of them is a Model-C that looks to be in much better condition than the rusted pile on ebay, it just needs a motor; Item # 80211358 , worth a look considering the price.
     
  12. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,301
    Location:
    NE London - UK

    The BUD is nice but is lacking changewheels. G&M will sell all of the accessories separately. With VAT and the cost of other bits and pieces you're looking at, perhaps, £900 by the time you've got the basics.
     
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  13. Arc Tourist

    Arc Tourist Forum Supporter

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    1,581
    Location:
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    Thought I'd mention G & M as I have found them to be reputable, and have never had a bad experience with anything I've purchased from them.
    It will be interesting to see what the ebay lathe goes for.

    On a side note: Still looking for the Weller soldering tips. ;)
     
  14. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,301
    Location:
    NE London - UK
    And I thought that you'd forgotten ;)
     
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  15. Arc Tourist

    Arc Tourist Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,581
    Location:
    California & Wales
    Senility is not one of my attributes, at least not yet. :D
     
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  16. Arc Tourist

    Arc Tourist Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,581
    Location:
    California & Wales
    the ebay Boxford went for £455.oo
     
  17. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,301
    Location:
    NE London - UK
    Probably to be broken. Travelling steady £75-125, threading dials around the same each.
     
  18. Wedg1e

    Wedg1e They call me Mr. Bodge-angles

    Messages:
    6,575
    Location:
    Teesside, England
    Boxfords do seem to be fetching silly money these days, and the various accessories even more so. There was an incomplete dividing head on Ebay a week or two back that made over £300. I was watching it (even though I knew I'd have practically no use for it :D) but the bidding went way beyond what I'd have spent for an ornament. And it would still need dividing plates and whatever other parts were missing. You'd be most of the way to buying the material and making your own.

    I bought an AUD with a generous amount of tooling for £700 in 2005. It was a 1972 machine IIRC.
    I bought my VSL500, a 1978 ex-school metric machine with 3 and 4-jaws, travelling steady, faceplate, catchplate, quick-change TP and a couple of holders, both centres inc. the headstock reducer, a few cutting tools, spindle spanner and a few odds and ends... £800 in 2007. I sold the AUD for more than I'd paid, met the buyer at Leicester Forest services and heaved it out of my van and into his trailer. Might have been one of you lot :D

    The only things I've subsequently felt I 'needed' for the VSL were a fixed steady (which turned out to be for the 4.5" models rather than the 5" it needs, so misadvertised, but the price was right and for the few jobs I've used it on, it was better than not having one) and the metric/imperial translation gearset which came from a forum member (apologies, can't recall who off the top of my head) and actually has seen action.

    Ignore phrases like 'ex-school machine, has done no work, no wear on bed, no backlash'. These things are around half a century old and unless it was grandad's retirement gift and he looked after it like some sort of sacred ring, it WILL have wear and lash to some degree. Some of it you can live with, some of it can be fixed. What you really don't want is knackered headstock bearings, bent spindle, a twisted bed or half the teeth missing from the gearbox - all of which might only be found after buying it, of course. If you find grandad's machine being disposed of after his demise, then good luck in also finding that the family don't do their research and ask top whack for it - or sell it to a machinery trader, who certainly will (and of course it'll be raped for all its accessories).

    A shiny coat of paint proves nothing. Boxfords had painted swarf trays. The paint cannot survive having swarf dragged over it, so be suspicious if it looks undamaged. Boxford also liberally slathered their castings in body filler which was smoothed off before painting. Very few people ever bother to repair the filler before they slap on a coat of (the wrong colour) paint and the damage to the underlying layers is obvious, even in Ebay photos taken from 10 feet away. If they've painted it, what else are they hiding? Headstock, tailstock, carriage and bed all from different machines of different ages? It happens.

    If you think you can get away without screwcutting, think again. You'll pick up the basics of turning very quickly and before you know it there'll be a left-hand multistart tapered internal thread to do :whistle:

    In my humble opinion, avoid the early '2-lever' headstock models (the backgear needed 2 levers moving to engage it, one on top and one on the front of the h/stock). Largely because they really are old machines. I know there'll be some good ones but statistics aren't on your side when you're buying old Boxfords. Their target market was education and training establishments; I remember having them in our school metalwork department, and they weren't new then, and this was the 1970s. Kids make mistakes, and apprentices didn't care.

    In order of desirability (fairly obviously ) - VSL500, VSL, AUD, BUD, A, B, CUD, C, TUD. There was also the ME10 but I think I've only ever seen one. The ME10A (with gearbox) probably on a par with an AUD as the clutch offsets the lack of underdrive?
    The holy grail is probably a long-bed metric VSL500, with electromagnetic spindle brake... if they even made one :D
    The C's and the TUD will do the bare bones of spinning a thing while you take a tool to it; if it's really cheap, it's better than no lathe at all but I'd have an eye on cleaning it up and selling on at a profit to invest in a better model.
     
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