Bought myself a new ac/dc tig

  1. C4irney

    C4irney Member

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    30
    Location:
    Glasgow
    Hi guys, been a long term lurker on this forum, also done quite a lengthy post on an old car I was replacing both sills on with sheet steel, without the help from here I probably would've thrown in the towel halfway through as I felt in over my head for a first project but all the comments and advice from here was a massive help so guessing you guys can help again.

    Just Bought myself a new Rtech acdc 160amp tig welder, the first job I had to do was extend the exhaust leading to the back box on my Integra which was stainless. Started practicing on a spare bit of stainless exhaust and just made a mess to be honest and got me thinking this isn't how it goes down on they YouTube vids I've watched lol. I didn't have a clue where any of the settings on the welder should be so just kept playing away. Eventually got the machine dialled in to where it worked the best for me, got the exhaust done but not to the standard I would've liked so I'll probably do it again once I've practiced a bit more.

    But today's job was just horrible and couldn't seem to find a sweet spot with the welder. I needed to make some intercooler boost pipes for my Integra (2mm alluminium) tried 1.6mm red tungsten and it just kept balling the tip so stuck in a 2.4mm and it was slightly better. My biggest problem was butt joining the pipe, the edges would burn away almost instantly making it impossible to even start a puddle, also most of the time the arc was causing violent splattering and when adding filler it was burning green and splattering. The welds were hideous, all porous and burnt, any ideas where I'm going wrong? I got a full bottle of argon today so there's plenty of gas, waiting on a flow meter coming so I can regulate the gas better. When just laying weld on a piece of metal I seem to get an almost acceptable weld however can't do a joint without the edges burning away. Any help is massively appreciated, even just a starting point with the settings on the welder, and sorry for the massive post 20181008_174853.jpg 20181008_174841.jpg 20181008_174853.jpg 20181008_174841.jpg 20181008_173540.jpg 20181008_152402.jpg 20181008_153404.jpg 20181008_152417.jpg
     
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  2. 8ob

    8ob Forum Supporter

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    Never mind the welder, tell us more about the car :thumbup:

    Bob
     
  3. zzr1200

    zzr1200 Working at 650 ft on open steel work

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    Were you purging the inside of the pipe with gas?
     
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  4. Stingray Member

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    421
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    Northern Ireland
    Think you’re trying to run before you can walk, you’re better not going straight into a project without some serious guidance and practice first, you need to get some scrap plate and just try and run some beads first without joining metal together, then move onto butt and fillet welds on the flat before you try welding pipework or anything complicated, welding always looks easy to a novice when your watching videos on YouTube, it’s only until you have to pick up a torch or set of tongs and do it then you realise that you need a steady hand, hand eye coordination and a serious knowledge of what you are doing, start by going back to the very basics, also look for threads on here, Richard is your Man to ask if you need any advice, you are trying to do the equivalence of trying to take an engine to bits and do a complete rebuild when the most experience you’ve had is maybe do an oil change, but with guidance, practice & perseverance you’ll get there...
    Good Luck!
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2018
  5. arther dailey Member

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    some firms van that is :scared: corker.
     
  6. pedrobedro

    pedrobedro Man at Matalan

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    Red Thoriated ? Get some 2% lanthanated or ceriated, thoriated are DC tungstens.
     
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  7. C4irney

    C4irney Member

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    30
    Location:
    Glasgow
    No i didnt back purge it, I thought you only needed to back purge stainless?

    And the car is a Integra type R that I've stuck a Garrett 3071r turbo on , makes 450hp at 14psi, it's a handful lol
     
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  8. C4irney

    C4irney Member

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    Location:
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    Also I thought a red tungsten was stable at welding all materials but after having a look online it seems I was wrong. Would it make that much of a difference?
     
  9. doubleboost

    doubleboost Member

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    Have a look at the tutorials on the forum
    The R Tech ones are worth watching as well
     
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  10. C4irney

    C4irney Member

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    30
    Location:
    Glasgow
    Just looking through the forum there and saw Richards sticky about learning tig, some amazing info in there and very well explained. When I was taking up mig I hunted the forum for tips and advice, I hadnt done the same in the tig section.......doh!! Doing it now though
     
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  11. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

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    Very vry good advice. Better still get someone who can, looking over your shoulder!
     
  12. Richard.

    Richard. Member

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    Your taking on way too much mate.
    You’ve bought a piece of equipment that devotes time, practice and skill. Then without any of those 3 things you’ve taken on a difficult process and tried to apply it to a highly skilled joint. Forgive me here but you stand no chance and if that motor is your pride and joy I’d suggest you stop right there and leave it well alone.
    You can’t just buy a tig set for the first time and get fired straight into aluminium tubular joints. You need to start off with some flat plate of sensible thickness and perfect the basics laying down some runs. Some tuition will move things on quicker. YouTube and forum advice is ok but it can contradict and picking out the good from the bad is tricky when your starting out.
    You don’t need to purge aluminium and ref the tungsten type while reds are not the best choice for ac, changing them out at this stage won’t make a blind bit of difference to your results on tube.
    Follow the guide I wrote, understand it and apply it to beads on plate. All the settings and info you need are in it to get started
    Anything that doesn’t make sense just ask. I’ll be reluctant to help though if you continue to fight with thin aluminium tube. You need to absolutely nail the basics of tig in the easiest position before moving on. I’d start out on dc personally because you get more time to think and it’s less volatile when you make a mistake.
     
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  13. Stingray Member

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    Northern Ireland
    Good advice there Richard!
     
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  14. Richard.

    Richard. Member

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    It was exactly the same as yours lol
     
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  15. C4irney

    C4irney Member

    Messages:
    30
    Location:
    Glasgow
    Thanks for the advice guys. I generally pick things up pretty quickly and after watching nearly every tig vid on YouTube thought I had a good idea of what to do. It looks remarkably easy when a pro is doing it on a video but is definitely a different story doing it myself. I abandoned the idea of trying to join the pipes I need for the car and I'll stick to playing on scrap just now, although the only alluminium scrap I have is the same intercooler pipe :doh:
     
  16. Stingray Member

    Messages:
    421
    Location:
    Northern Ireland
    It’s unfortunate that you’ve bought a machine and materials for your project and it’s ended up the way it has, sorry to be “a bit brutal” with My advice but I think you know yourself now what skill is involved, do not get disheartened and go back to basics and practice, there’s nothing worse as doing something that’s not for a novice and making a mess, it does nothing for your confidence, I taken some old wallpaper of a kitchen ceiling once and half the plaster come off, I had never plastered before, I thought if I can weld overhead with 6mm electrodes throwing a bit of plaster on the overhead should be a doddle ha ha, I ended up with as much plaster on the floor and never left it long enough before I polished it, the more I tried to fix it the worse it got, I’ve never plastered anything since!
    Get some scrap and practice, perseverance shall pay off, leave the difficult stuff for experienced guys just now but good luck and hopefully you’ll be running some nice beads shortly!
     
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  17. Seano

    Seano Member

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    Very sound advice from both people, I came to tig ally very late in life, but having spent my life using all types of processes during my professional life but the two processes that really made me smile once I had nailed them after so much practice I almost gave up was overhead stick tee joints and uphill tig ally tee joints, huge feeling of success from both processes, what I am saying is, there is no substitute for bucket or seat time when practicing a new process, ask lots, watch lots, and practice even more, you'll get there in the end.
     
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  18. ScoobyMick Member

    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    brackley,Northants
    C4irney, I was in the same boat as you a few months back with my new AC/DC Tig set - getting good beads on mild and stainless flat plate on the bench but trying to weld thin wall intercooler pipe for my Turbo bike project was just a nightmare.
    Can echo the comments above about practice,practice,practice - start on thicker material and it will all come good then work your way down to your intercooler pipework.
    The aluminium tig tutorials put up by Richard are a goldmine of information to someone starting out and along with the help from the forum, you will be getting great results.
    Nice Integra by the way and the Garrett 3071r is a great spooling turbo
     
  19. Dutch Welder Member

    Messages:
    245
    Location:
    Oss, The Netherlands
    Keep on practicing.
    Also check out the actual material of your piping.
    I bought some cheap piping for the front mount Intercooled, reverse intake manifold Impreza, running a GT3076 (it's a great turbo indeed btw) and the piping was absolutely terrible to weld.I first checked all the machine settings, checked the gas, checked everything, and after giving the piping to a mate of mine who does aluminium welding as a job (mine is just hobby stuff, I am not a welder perse, just a mechanic who can weld)
    it turned out to be the piping itself. It wasn't anodised ,it was cleaned with acetone etcetera, but after striking an arc a whole lot of soot came into the puddle (with a big gas lens,cleaning set way up, without even adding filler)

    Bought some different piping and though my welds where nowhere near show quality it in an instance looked much better. (with the same settings/etc)
     
  20. D5meister Member

    Messages:
    96
    Location:
    uk cambs
    Steel is about the easiest (and cheapest) material to weld on. Get some about 2.5-3mm thick and do some basics on that using 1.6mm filler. 1mm can be handy on thin stuff. Your Red Thoriated are good for that. Current at https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/tig-calculator.htm

    The butt joint you need is a good one to start with in steel ironically. Then the Lap ( more control needed ) then the fillet, even more control needed.

    Stainless is more about getting weld power in and getting out again without toasting the material. The heat stays close to the weld as a poor conductor of heat. A by product of this is it often buckles it. Back purge is a good idea.

    Ally, the heat wicks away into the material well, as a good conductor of heat. Early on this is good, half way thru the job (especially if small/thin) has all of that heat stored and is presented back at the advancing weld and adds to the arc heat and the ally begins to melt like chocolate in sun. So can be tricky, as ally when hot (heat soaked) can run or drip - you know this already. Backing the power off with a pedal is a fix.

    At least you have a brilliant project car, we just have welders... plus you have learned a lot by being ballsy and having a go
     
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