Binzel MB25 EVO Vs Parweld's Pro-Grip

  1. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of many trades, Master of none

    Messages:
    2,645
    Location:
    Cumbria
    It wasn't a Bernard style I was thinking of... don't think it was Tweco either. It specifically looked like a binzel style MB36 gas nozzle with the steel clip over the back, but in 25 torch dimensions... maybe not necessarily a binzel, maybe i dreamed it!

    EDIT:
    Nah it was a binzel... designated a 24 or 26. Can't find any for sale though

    https://www.binzel-abicor.com/UK/eng/products/manual/migmag-torches/welding-torch-mb-grip/

    In fact, I've decided that a watercooled 240D would be just the ticket for 99% of my work, probably better than the 36 I have atm :D
     
  2. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of many trades, Master of none

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    Location:
    Cumbria
  3. Domdom Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    316
    Location:
    UK, Warwickshire
    What are the benefits if you don't mind me asking? I use a 36 on an R-Tech 250 which doesn't have water cooling. But the main reason for the 36 upgrade was that I tend to mostly weld thick stuff so usually up and above 180 amps.
     
    metalmelt likes this.
  4. metalmelt Member

    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    UK
    Have you looked at the Parweld XP8 water cooled.
     
  5. Munkul

    Munkul Jack of many trades, Master of none

    Messages:
    2,645
    Location:
    Cumbria
    I generally weld around 200 amps so a 36 torch is fine, although it gets hot with any decent quantity of work. I still don't do all that much MIG though.
    I recently got our Kemppis at work kitted up with water coolers and 501D torches and WHAT a difference, the lads would never go back to air cooled. Everything stays cooler throughout, so its more comfortable, spatter doesn't build up as much, and tips last longer. I watched someone put down 2ft of 300 amps weld, and I touched the shroud with my bare hand 10 seconds later. Active cooling really is the future.
    The benefit to the 240D torch, for me, would be similar amperage range to the 36 (i only ever use 1mm wire up to a max of 300 amps) and the active cooling, but in a smaller more compact torch.
    So this then gives more flexibility for welding in tighter gaps, lighter weight, easier to control for more precise work (athough usually use the TIG set for this)
    The other thing is aluminium - runs a lot better in a water cooled torch.

    Similar to going from a WP26 TIG torch to a watercooled WP20 torch... everything is better :) apart from your wallet :D I won't be changing anything any time soon, got more important things to spend money on, but I do have a spare water cooler to sort out for my MIG set at some point :)
     
  6. henry Kadzielski Member

    Messages:
    871
    Location:
    Australia Wollongong
    ^^^ Couldn't agree more, water cooled is the way to go. I bought a Abicor Binzel 455t torch, even fitted it with 10mm silver tips and still it gave trouble:flame:, not even after a longer run (1.2solid wire 35volts something like that, display showed about 380amps). Now with a water cooled MB36 tips last sooooo much longer and no feed issues:D. Don't know if there are smaller sized torches that are water cooled. Basically in Binzel style it's 15, 24, 36 and water cooled 36. I'm using a MB36 now on .8mm solid wire and welding up to about 6mm and it's going fine. Was using a MB24 and it gave trouble, with getting too hot, tips sticking. It really comes down to how much you have to do and in what time. You can use a much smaller torch, but you must let it cool down. On the other hand if you have much to get through and you have to 'crack on' then bigger is best:thumbup:
     
    metalmelt likes this.
  7. metalmelt Member

    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    UK
    Been using a 50 water cooled set up today with water cooler and working in confined spaces does really show them to their full advantage as instead of sweating cobs the environment is much cooler.
    Water cooling does not so much offer a cooler torch, and while this is a definate benefit, the real benefits come with thermal expansion issues as they clip the top peaks of heat out and run a more consistent temperature for longer, this minimises thermal expansion primarily on a brass swans neck, liner, and front end of the torch and it is this which allegdly is the greatest benefit.
     
    henry Kadzielski likes this.
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