BBQ Project - as part of learning to MIG weld.

  1. Dadweld New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Location:
    Goring, Oxfordshire
    Dear All,

    I'm new to fabrication (if you can call it that) and as part of learning to MIG weld, have fabricated a flat metal surface, on a table on which to weld. It's nothing compared to some enormous tables I've seen in the projects section of this forum and there's no way I'm showing it! It probably wouldn't support tonnes but it's flat and served as good experience and will assist in the next project.

    I decided it was a good idea to make a bbq from 2 mm mild steel sheet and wished to ask for advice on the best way to go about welding the edges of the material with a MIG welder (Tecarc 181).
    I imagined just welding down the outside corner of the joint, creating a small fillet to hold the two pieces.
    From what I've read since the initial design is that the metal will warp with the heat and it'll be a bit of a mess.
    I have some small square section tube that could be welded to through the gap in the edge joint if that would help. I bought some small section angle to do this but it's not straight.

    I was going to make a box then cut it near the top to create a lid.

    This may be completely daft of me to even attempt this and those more experienced (or not) may scoff but I plan to attempt this with what I have and any advice and words of wisdom would be gratefully received.

    Thanks and best regards.
     
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  2. gaz1

    gaz1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    10,436
    Location:
    westyorkshire
    it wont be just tack weld through the corners and then tack weld inside as well this will hold it in place for you whilst you weld it up

    another project for you is rocket stove hotplate



     
  3. Feet 'n Inches

    Feet 'n Inches Out of the rat-race at last

    Messages:
    222
    Location:
    Devon, England
    One of the regular jobs I had was fabricating and welding chutes for the quarry industry, usually out of 6 mm or 8 mm mild steel. The steel was cut for open corner welds as you've shown in your photos. In most cases, all we'd do was to tack weld on the inside and then run full welds down the outside. We'd also tack in some temporary cross braces, if needed, to prevent the job distorting too much out of square. As most were flanged top and bottom and therefore reasonably rigid, this was sometimes a case of belt and braces. We used stick a lot more than MIG so the heat input was greater but to mitigate this, welding downhill as much as the rods would allow seemed to work.

    Incidentally don't worry too much about your table. When I was in the job I had a 6 ft x 2 ft wooden bench with a lump of 3/4" plate on top. At home I have an 8ft x 2ft stainless steel bench that came from an industrial kitchen plus a chunk of 4ft x 4ft ply with a frame screwed to it to make it rigid which is plonked on top of a couple of trestles. Works for me! :)
     
  4. Dadweld New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Location:
    Goring, Oxfordshire
    Good afternoon and thank you both for your response. I initially bought the welder to repair the bonnet brackets on my son's 1958 FE35 tractor which hasn't happened yet. I've had a look at a few of the welding videos on Youtube. I like Allen's welding - don't know if you've seen it or not? I will look at those attached in due course.

    I've had a go on some off cuts of the same material (2 mm mild steel). With the machine set on 1, 'high range' (2 high keeps tripping my 16 A (type C) mcb - extremely annoying!) and wire feed at 4.5, the result was as follows...
    I started on the right hand side. In the middle it started spattering so had to burn through that which is why the weld looks different and towards the end it looks different too, maybe as the material got hotter. There is some good penetration too!... I'm reasonably happy with the results and there doesn't seem to be any notable distortion of the metal. I quite like the look of the welds especially at the start and I don't think there's any need to grind any off (which my neighbours will be pleased about!).

    Thanks for looking and any thoughts you may have are appreciated.
     
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  5. Feet 'n Inches

    Feet 'n Inches Out of the rat-race at last

    Messages:
    222
    Location:
    Devon, England
    I'm no expert when it comes to MIG, stick was always my thing but the outside weld looks ok to me.

    You may find there's a bit off spillover onto the edges of the plate. Just to make the job look good, I'd be inclined to run a grinder along the edges just to smooth things off a bit. No need to work on the actual weld unless you're looking to produce a rounded finish.
     
  6. Dadweld New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Location:
    Goring, Oxfordshire
    Good evening,

    There is some spillover on the edges and it probably needs grinding off.
    I'm going to cut a couple more pieces to test on, but will turn down the voltage to 4, 'low range' in an attempt to reduce the spill over.
    When I welded the first test piece, I could see the edges melting quite quickly. If I can get the edges melting with some penetration (and not as much spillover) I'll go with that.
     
  7. Feet 'n Inches

    Feet 'n Inches Out of the rat-race at last

    Messages:
    222
    Location:
    Devon, England
    As well as experimenting with current and voltage settings, try also varying your speed of travel. This may help with spillover although with 2 mm plate, there's less room for 'error' than thicker steel.
     
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