Advice before I commit sacrilege

  1. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,305
    Location:
    Staffordshire, England
    Putting it on centre height will make it work properly, however that is achieved, Doesn’t matter if the tool is vertical, upside down or whatever, as long as the tip is centre height it will work. :D
     
  2. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,522
    essex england
    Not for facing with those negative rake things, I messed up a job the other day trying it:ashamed:
     
  3. Hood

    Hood If it walks like a duck....

    Messages:
    11,655
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    I remember I had, what I think was called a boat style, on the wee Myford. The base of the toolpost was concave and the "boat " was convex and that allowed you to vary the height and angle by rotating/sliding, it was useless for carbide though as it messed up the inserts designed geometry and chip breaking ability.
     
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  4. Hood

    Hood If it walks like a duck....

    Messages:
    11,655
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    I am of the same opinion as @pressbrake1 if carbide inserts are being used, they are designed for being presented at a set angle to the work and that is straight in. Doesn't matter if it is above below, front or back but the angle of presentation should be flat/90 or whatever you want to call it.
     
  5. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Staffordshire, England
    See what you mean now, carbide can be very finicky stuff sometimes.
     
  6. brightspark

    brightspark Member

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    30,337
    Location:
    yarm stockton on tees
    and more overhang at the tip with the tool stuck out :vsad::laughing:
     
  7. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,522
    essex england
    Rake is set to tool path :thumbup:
     
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  8. Hood

    Hood If it walks like a duck....

    Messages:
    11,655
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    I was busy whilst I wrote the above post and it is a bit confusing. Where I said above or below, front or back, the above or below is not referring to centre height of the tool but rather the position of the holder, ie such as slant bed lathe would often be described as being above.
     
  9. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,456
    Location:
    NE London - UK

    "Clog-heel" or "American style"
     
  10. Hood

    Hood If it walks like a duck....

    Messages:
    11,655
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    This was the type except mine was on the front.

    ScreenHunter_3415 Dec. 14 22.23.jpg

    And this is the boat.

    ScreenHunter_3416 Dec. 14 22.23.jpg
     
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  11. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,522
    essex england
    A lathe with decent power will punish you for hoochy tool setups for sure
     
  12. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    9,408
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    I like the little Hardinge style tool posts. The tool is held flat but adjusted for height by a taper and jack screw. Got a couple of those.
     
  13. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,305
    Location:
    Staffordshire, England
    Depends how much overhang it needs to get it centred. All tools have some overhang, no reason this would have any more than normal.
     
  14. Hood

    Hood If it walks like a duck....

    Messages:
    11,655
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    The turret I got from a Bullard CNC had a similar setup, worked very well and so simple to adjust the height to perfection.
    The only pic I can find is this one, the tool is upside down so it looks a bit weird as the wedge (arrowed) is acting on the top of the tool but if you imagine the turret rotated 180 degrees so that that tool is in the cutting position then the wedge would be underneath.

    ScreenHunter_3418 Dec. 15 12.06.jpg
     
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  15. Kram

    Kram Member

    Messages:
    1,418
    Location:
    Sussex
    Make a small spacer block to use instead of compound slide. Toolholders are hard, and a pain to mill on a small machine, I gave up and used grinder on the couple I have.

    Then buy a proper qctp. The amount of time saved is worth the cost.
     
  16. Wedg1e

    Wedg1e They call me Mr. Bodge-angles

    Messages:
    6,576
    Location:
    Teesside, England
    For my Boxford I have a number of indexable holders that were all too big for the Dickson toolpost but too cheap to pass up :D
    Five minutes in the mill tickling the bottom face off and Robert is a DNA match for your maternal parent.

    The Boxie will take up to 16mm square shanks I think, most of mine started life 20 or 25 square.
     
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