Advancing my welding career

  1. Gph363 New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    England, midland.
    Hi guys new here, completed a 4 year apprenticeship about 2 years ago gained a level 3 NVQ advanced diploma in welding and fabrication, so have 6 years experience. Feel like I have gained lots of skills and confidence in this time, but also now how much more I could learn. I want to take the next step in my career and gain a more skilled job in the industry then I currently have, in my aprentiship I learnt mig on mild steel all joint types in all positions and tig on mild steel and stainless all joint types in all positions (lots of other thing where learnt I.e material maths and science advanced fab etc but this was the welding I did) In my current job role though I only do mig welding, so my first step I’ve decided i’m going to buy a tig welder to re-learn and better my skills, Every job I think is a chance to move up in my career always requires experience in that field or never get back to me. I’m wondering how to get a foot in the door, is getting coded going to help me?? Really want to go to the next level and gain a more advanced challenging job but need advise on how to do that, so what do you think guys any advise??
     
  2. cumbriasteve

    cumbriasteve Moderator

    Messages:
    9,660
    Location:
    Cumbria UK
    Welcome to the forum.

    I could be totally wrong but get the impression there is no shortage of applicants for work and employers have a pick of applicants so you are in a big pool with some having years of experience.

    I would probably try and speak face to face even if there are no vacancies at the moment, ask what they look for, what they expect etc.

    Im a big believer of knocking on doors rather than an easy to ignore CV or letter.

    Check all the vacancies listed and what qualifications they are requiring.

    It's always difficult if other applicants have the same qualifications as you but they also have several years on site experience.
     
    Lordspectre and eLuSiVeMiTe like this.
  3. Robbie260 Member

    Messages:
    557
    Location:
    Scotland highland
    Could look in to becoming loyds register or ABS (american beuro of shipping) coded/certified that will open up doors for you to work in the likes of BAE systems shipyard or on welding boilers and pressure vessels.
     
    pressbrake1 likes this.
  4. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    Unless the jobs your applying for are specifically looking for coding it’s a waste of time and money

    Being coded doesn’t mean you can fan something up from scratch it just means you can weld to a set standard

    What do you want to do for work is the most important question you need to ask your self
     
  5. Gph363 New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    England, midland.
     
  6. Gph363 New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    England, midland.
    Hi Robbie thanks, this is the exact type of level I’m wanting to go to, been looking for Information on this for ages and I’ve just got more from you then anywebsite never heard of any of what you just said I’m going to start looking into it and and more information will be much appreciated
     
  7. Gph363 New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    England, midland.
    Hi stuvy thanks for your reply, I have been welding and fabricating for 7 years in industry building with 1mm to 6 mm sheet metal and up to 25mm heavy plate building lots of one off custom un-jigged fabrications and after seven years am now at the point I get given a drawing and fab and weld it with no input, As well as lots of production work but the production nearly all gets subed out now as the company has grown massively and the costum proto-type stuff is all in house, so I believe I can already fabricate somthing from scratch, I’m at a level of good fabricator welding, but am wanting to go next level like the level Robbie has said pressured vessels shipyard and boilers ive even looked at aoro-space welding etc, a lot of jobs I have applied for mention previous coding will be a advantage, I’ve been thinking of coding in mig mild steel in 6g position in ASME 1X, and bs en 9606 as you seem to be able to do both at the same time And tig stainless steel in 6g. As I can practice these myself and not have to pay for training just a test day.

    I mean my dream job would be building custom hot rods or somthing but that is probably every welder fabricators dream job lol,
     
  8. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,786
    essex england
    Get coded though that’s expensive, but then you can work as a journeyman ie visit different shop that need coded work for a day whilst building up experience.
    Learn to machine.
    Learn fine limit sheet metal
    There is much to learn
     
  9. Robbie260 Member

    Messages:
    557
    Location:
    Scotland highland
    Welcome and glad to be of some help here is the stuff you need to look into from loyds for starters.

    https://www.lr.org/en/materials-and-welding/welder-and-welding-operator-qualification-services/

    https://www.lr.org/en/materials-and-welding/is-weld-certification-guide/

    If i remember correctly welding certification exams from loyds are pricy and have to be recertified every 5 years. American beuro of shipping certification is one exam currently and certified for life. Loyds is the gold standard in the shipping industry classification societys. There is also DNV GL who are second behind loyds im not sure what thier exams are.

    One of the weird things about the shipping industry is that certifictaion from any classification society is recognised by anyother.

    Have a look at babcock, BAE systems, Alfa Laval (Allborg boilers), websites as they all might have jobs on offer which include inhouse training to thier exact requirements.

    Edit: If you are going to get the qualifications off your own back ensure that its a genuine course and not a phony one. I would phone or email the classification society you select and ask them for a list of thier approved training providers or examination centers. There should be such a thing or an equivalent. Like below.

    http://www.lrqa.co.uk/what-we-do/manufacturing-inspection/welding-certification-service.aspx
     
  10. gaz_moose Member

    Messages:
    955
    Location:
    tamworth staffordshire
    if your in the midlands just go work at rolls Royce welding up the submarines.

    joking aside have a long hard think about what you actually want. make your own choices, don't let choices make you.
     
    Robbie260 likes this.
  11. Gph363 New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    England, midland.
    Thanks for the reply Yer I know it’s expensive and everybody says you should never pay for your own codes etc, but seems from what I can tell the only way to get a foot in the door employees seem to want proof you can pass codes before they’ll cough up there own money. But working as a journeyman sounds good could probably do that on the side of my day job at first while I was building up experience and getting known, anymore info on how to go about this would be much appreciated.
     
  12. Gph363 New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    England, midland.
    Thanks again Robbie downloaded the guide and looking into it all, and I’ll make sure I check the company I decide to get coded with are not fake. Checked out them company’s for jobs aswell don’t seem to have many up for welders at the minute but I’ll continue to keep a eye out thanks
     
    Robbie260 likes this.
  13. Robbie260 Member

    Messages:
    557
    Location:
    Scotland highland
    I know it might not be the exact direction you want to go in but norton motorbikes are looking for welders at the moment, it was mentioned in one of the other fourm threads.
     
  14. Kent

    Kent Member

    Messages:
    10,002
    Location:
    Bowland, Lanacshire,UK
    Every job becomes just a job.. You just dont meet many guys on the tools directly that are really doing that great unless they are ina real niche
    Consider widening your skill bade rather than codings etc try testing and inspection, design or general management experience

    Hor rods etc? Come on we are talking real world paying the mortgage etc not tv and u tube.. Its also UK not USA

    Learning buisness is likely a better way to better money and bigger opertunity worldwide than extra tallent welding.. But hnc etc and the buisness acumen will with the right drive will get you further thsn proving your the best welder in the nation though
     
    addjunkie and stuvy like this.
  15. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    I totally agree with what @Kent has posted

    Iv been so lucky to have three mag features with cars Iv built

    Can you strip and rebuild an engine, what’s your panel beating and wet spraying like? The more you keep in house the better it will be for you. Maybe a side move into a garage restoring cars is a better role for you

    I will say you can earn more in a warehouse/factory doing a rubbish job than most production welders or panel beaters do
     
  16. Kent

    Kent Member

    Messages:
    10,002
    Location:
    Bowland, Lanacshire,UK
    A carrer in Tesco starting stacking shelves lead my mate (trained Shepherd) to become store manager and today own his own large farm shop and bistro in a posh area .
     
  17. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    it might pay well but now I want job satisfaction rather than money.

    Don’t get me wrong I’m not minted but comfortable and strangely enough having a full career change myself
     
  18. Kent

    Kent Member

    Messages:
    10,002
    Location:
    Bowland, Lanacshire,UK
    Thats fine if your in your later fourties onward not a great move late twenties early thirties imo - especially today with the housing market and high personal debt levels
     
  19. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    34 and £200 on a credit card zero debt and no mortgage

    Will start a new post with my new plans
     
Advertisements