About time I bought a fire extinguisher for the workshop...

  1. Wany Member

    Messages:
    177
    Location:
    Gloucester, UK
    My company directs us not to tackle fires and sound the alarm and get out. They supply extinguishers in case you need them to get out. I'm lucky enough to have been on the simulated training and have been a fire warden 20+ years. Since doing more metal work and having more tins of stuff for the bike I bought a big metal cupboard for the garage to keep it all in as I'd rather not set it all off and then get a bollocking (rightly) from the fire brigade.
     
  2. addjunkie

    addjunkie Member

    Messages:
    6,482
    Location:
    Northumberland. Reet oot in the sticks
    Twin agent fire fighting is very efficient, but its powder and AFFF, quick knock down, then a sealing blanket.

    Over the years Ive done a fair bit of fire training. Most places Ive worked, there was no where to run too.

    On one course I did, there was another group from an office. Quite amusing watching them scared to use a fire blanket.
     
    James1979 likes this.
  3. MetalMonkey Member

    Messages:
    441
    Location:
    UK
    That depends a lot on whether the contents is worth more than the building, and your assessment of the risks.

    The sensible (safe) thing, of course, is to exit the building and let it burn. So really a good fire escape and fire detection is a better investment than a fire extinguisher.
    However, I personally would prefer to minimise damage to the assets in order of value and difficulty to replace/repair (i.e. contents first, shed second). In which case, powder is a poor choice.
     
  4. Turbo Member

    Messages:
    3,856
    Location:
    Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
    I wouldn't recommend powder for a car, if it discharges accidentally it will cause that much damage it will write off the car (I know of somebody that it happened to). Foam is what is used in most rally & race cars & that is what I would use.
     
    slim_boy_fat likes this.
  5. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    God God, just have two [or even more, and obviously all appropriately located] should you feel the need to assess the fire and select and use the appropriate type. :scared:

    Because a] common sense is a misnomer b]most people panic when faced with fire and all they might know/may have been taught goes out the window or door, as they should...;)
     
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  6. cheb Member

    Messages:
    1,219
    Location:
    Outer Hebrides
    And I don't think tooth sucking experts, and 'experts' help. Practical training does, and I'm glad I've had some. Even discharging an out of date extinguisher at a suitable home made fire might do some good.

    Leaving the building and letting the fire and rescue people do their business is very good advice, but not much help when you're on a fishing boat.
     
  7. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark perkele

    Messages:
    13,746
    Location:
    England

    But, there you are in a whole new ball game and set of rules.

    It is so difference there is, for that, a whole set of regulations and requirements.

    It is a lot more interesting than the normal ones. As they are written by people who have done that job.
     
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  8. Pete.

    Pete. Member

    Messages:
    9,817
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    Powder is the last one I'd grab for and I've put out countless small fires.

    Mind you, I had a generator go up quite spectacularly last year, that required a good dose of powder.
     
  9. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark perkele

    Messages:
    13,746
    Location:
    England
    Just because a Powder has a ABC fire rating does not mean it is suitable for all types of fires, all the time.

    Thanks Chubb for selling that idea.

    Dry powder should be used for mainly Liquid fuel fires. As the primary use.
    The A next.

    Class C is advised for a trained operative to tackle a gas fire.
     
  10. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,904
    UK London
    People should learn as much as they can about dealing with emergency situations and good practical experience is the best but sound practical advice on how to deal with it is a good second. "I won't tell you because you're not qualified" is the absolute worst case.

    Sure, run away and let the experts deal with it is the safest, easiest option for passing the buck but leads to ridiculous elfin safety nonsense we see so often it's almost invisible.

    ---xxx---

    What is a safe speed for this bend?
    Oh I reckon I'd hit that at 70/80 and take it from there.

    Ok, put the signs up, make it a statutory limit and put your name on it.
    Oh. Err, well in that case let's say max speed 20mph to be on the safe side ....

    ---xxx---

    Hi is that emergency services?

    Yes.
    My kitchen is on fire, there's a load of smoke.

    Get out now!
    Ok. Is there anything I can try to put it out?

    No, leave the building immediately and we'll send the Fire Brigade. What is your address?
    Flat 16 Grenfell Tower...

    ---xxx---
     
  11. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark perkele

    Messages:
    13,746
    Location:
    England
    Back in January this year. I gave a neighbour 4 fire extinguishers. 1 xCO2, 2 x 9lt Foams , 1x 6kg powders and 1 6lt water.

    All in date for service, just removed from an old site.

    Today his often repaired lawn mower went up.
    Did he grab a fire extinguisher?

    No. Called 999.

    I spoke to him afterwards and asked why.
    His replay was he was scared and didn't know what one to use.

    Odd, as I did tell him when I gave him the units, what they could be used for.
     
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  12. ukracer Forum Supporter

    Co2 is used mainly for electric fires...or flood systems.
     
    metalmelt likes this.
  13. ukracer Forum Supporter

    Or high pressure fog....
     
    Parm and metalmelt like this.
  14. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Folk often panic when faced with a crisis.
     
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  15. ukracer Forum Supporter

    Correct...problem is they used to be Black. Now they are all the same colour with labels. Fine if you can read.
     
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  16. ukracer Forum Supporter

    Halons are primarily used in aviation as the fumes are toxic.
    BTF (used to be green) was awesome.
    BromoChlorodiFluoromethane .
     
  17. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark perkele

    Messages:
    13,746
    Location:
    England
    The EU forced through regulations that's all fire extinguishers are to be red.

    The UK forced back and managed to get a colour band, No more than 10% that could use the old colours to identify their use..

    Red for water.

    Black for CO2

    Blue for powder.

    Canary Yellow for Wet Chem
     
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  18. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark perkele

    Messages:
    13,746
    Location:
    England
    True.
    As BAFE registered engineer I have to stay with their views, that he did the correct thing.
     
    ukracer likes this.
  19. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark perkele

    Messages:
    13,746
    Location:
    England
    Halon units in the aviation industry is being phased out.

    Even in the MOD.
     
    ukracer likes this.
  20. ukracer Forum Supporter

    I was surprised they were not stopped using them before now. :(
     
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