A wee Matchless project

  1. MCKDAVID Member

    maybe a daft idea, and I've no experience of it, but what about lead, as in lead loading it, like they do for car bodies. Works fine on steel, can't think of any reason why it wouldn't work on alloy. Melting temperatures differences should be safe enough.. build it up, and dress it back with files etc.

    might be worth a dig around to see if it's feasible.
     
    cobbler03 likes this.
  2. Dieselkid 63

    Dieselkid 63 Banned from forklifts

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    Jeez, did someone spill mercury on it or something?!
     
  3. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

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    Lead won't bond with the aluminium.
     
  4. MCKDAVID Member

    why not, cleaned up, all oxidization removed, and with the right flux?

    not saying you're wrong, just curious.
     
  5. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

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    I've always believed they were ot compatible. However, I've just had a look online and come across this video -
    Oh well, something else learned today :thumbup:
     
  6. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

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    I'd go with the aluminium brazing myself...I've had good results with it in the past. What you could do is make a former out of some thin steel and then fill it up with the braze....it won't stick to the steel anyway so if you do a nice former you'll basically cast the braze to a nice shape and save on a heap of cleanup!

    Post some pics please....also you could cut a few grooves in the face you are brazing to so you also get a mechanical fix once the braze has set. I did it on a water pump lug....I made the whole lug out of braze....been fine for the last 4 years!

    You could make a steel former by copying one of the other good bolt holes maybe?
     
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  7. MCKDAVID Member

    agreed, brazing it would be a better / more permanent repair, as would building it up with weld / TIG. No I was thinking more that the lead might be a workable alternative, and easier to manage at home, with home workshop available materials. As I've said I've not tried it yet, but have thought about it for a while.
     
    cobbler03 likes this.
  8. Ton-up

    Ton-up Member

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    I'd clean it and fill with chemical metal if its not seen.
     
  9. MCKDAVID Member

    Thinking about some more and looking at the photos again, lead maybe too soft. Like I said daft idea...... Forget what I was saying, as you were....
    Move along, nothing to see here etc:laughing:
     
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  10. Rannsachair

    Rannsachair Forum Supporter

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    I suspect so, if I build up the area behind the frame lug, I suspect lead would deform when clamped up.
     
  11. mechman Member

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    If you don't fill it, it will be forever on your mind. Besides it not your style to leave it as it is.
     
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  12. Fintray

    Fintray Forum Supporter

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  13. jordan1 Member

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    I've used aluminium brazing HTS2000, works well in situations like this. Just have to make sure it is very clean and as important up to heat.
     
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  14. ronan

    ronan Forum Supporter

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  15. Rannsachair

    Rannsachair Forum Supporter

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    Thanks Ronan, I am currently on Cyprus on holiday and get a message the site is not available in my country.. perhaps just as well, the boss would not be impressed if another engine gets delivered. She would be suggesting another holiday. As well she will not realise what I spend on a new piston, reborn, stainless pushrod tubes, gasket set and a new bigger bore exhaust for the 500 :whistle:
     
  16. FZR750 Member

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    I had a G80 Matchless. Converted it into a trail bike, lost a lot of weight and rebored it with a new piston. It went very well! Good luck with yours.
     
  17. ronan

    ronan Forum Supporter

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    Maybe if Mrs Rannsachair knew how much old british bikes have appreciated in the past couple of decades, she might be encouraging you to buy more ! ! The ad is for a 16m engine, which is afaik, the same as the Matchless engine apart from the position of the magneto ? He wants 350 yoyos for it, which i think is good for a complete lump in good nick.
     
  18. Rannsachair

    Rannsachair Forum Supporter

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    She seems the same with my Land-rover, Saab 96 V4 and tools :)

    Not a bad price, about same as I paid for the 500.
     
  19. mechman Member

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    Gone are the days of the £5 motor bike and the days of getting them ( just take it away):(
     
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  20. jordan1 Member

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    My first bike, if I remember correctly, was a BSA 250cc hand change, cost me £2.10 shillings. I bought it from a chap when I was around 14yrs old, we used to ride it off road. Wish I had it now, would certainly be worth a bit more. Second one I bought for £5 from a garage when I was 15 was a 350sv ex. army Royal Enfield, stripped it down completely and rebuilt it, that was a real learning curve. Happy days.
     
    Rannsachair likes this.
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