1979 KE36 Corolla Rust help!

  1. Luca King New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Australia, QLD
    Hey everyone,

    I own a blue 76 ke36, which has a lot of rust. Most of the small buts and surface stuff I have repaired with bog and fibreglass, but, there are a few sections that are absolutely filthy with rust. The cheapest way for me to fix this will be without a welder (which I'm not sure is possible but if you have any techniques/links to fixing this sort of rust with out a welder, let me know) as I don't own one myself and my close mate has a arc welder, which I know will be painful for car rust repair.

    How shall I begin? Is there a cheap way I can get these holes fixed with/without a welder?

    Thanks again!

    Luca from AUS. 86313462_2257997760970210_8139390383755886592_n.jpg 84593634_185905759327849_2955377300004143104_n.jpg 85252414_226360805058315_1836965891980394496_n.jpg
     
  2. Dcal Member

    Messages:
    1,441
    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    Hi and welcome to the forum

    Probably not what you want to here but you will not fix that without a welder, but you could bodge it.
    I would be very doubtful if the car would be safe or road worthy after the bodge but that would depend on how far gone it is.
    Much better to do it properly, or get someone else to do it for you.

    Arc welders and body-panels do not go together well, but it can be done will some skill and small enough rods. It wont be pretty.
    A mig welder would be a much better option and are surprisingly cheap now.
     
  3. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    2,165
    Location:
    london
    I'd start by checking the situation on replacement panels....if replacements can't be found then you'll need the existing shapes for making up repair panels.

    My experience has been that Jap steel is very thin....but it only rusts locally. You could find a rusty hole and 2 inches away its factory fresh!

    ...and welcome to the forum!
     
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  4. Luca King New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Australia, QLD
    Thanks guys! Pleasure to be here. Thought I would need to weld it. Unfortunately for the model of car I have, replacement parts are getting difficult to find so that isn't an option. In terms of a physical welder, would this one cut it? https://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/tewantin/power-tools/mig-welder-155-a/1241133380

    Would it need a bigger amperage?

    In terms of tutorials and beginner stuff, could you point me in a particular direction?
    Cheers, Luca
     
  5. Robotstar5

    Robotstar5 Casanunda Staff Member

    Messages:
    17,907
    Location:
    Birmingham
    For bodywork the lowest current setting is more important, you need to look for something around 25-30A minimum and for tutorials, have a look here
     
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  6. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Welcome aboard, Luca. :waving:

    Imho, you need to first establish the extent of the corrosion, and that will involve cutting out what will appear at the moment to be on the surface. It's common to find that it extends beyond what you can see and the job becomes much bigger than anticipated.

    Ask any of the pro welders and/or mechanics on here if they enjoy welding on cars :welder:, and I can tell you what their answer will be.

    Good luck with the Toyota, and keep us updated with progress :thumbup:
     
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  7. mr haynes Member

    Messages:
    317
    Location:
    uk
    Should be able to make repair sections, for what's shown in pics, quite easily from sheet steel. Doorskin and wing look flat so chop off at clean above rot. Wouldn't bother trying to just patch the hole, simpler to replace whole bottom section.
    The door, being nonstructural, could have rot cut out and patch "glued" in if that what tickles your proverbial
     
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  8. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    2,165
    Location:
    london
    It's a jap car though...you might be able to make a door skin patch...welding it in without distortion is a whole different matter.

    My Figaro uses 1.2mm steel...but only on "structural" bits...rest is 0.7mm :(
     
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  9. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    I wonder if they were ever meant to reach these shores :dontknow: - Japan = no salt on roads = corrosion over here...:(
     
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  10. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    2,165
    Location:
    london
    To be fair they never exported them...people here imported them on a personal basis but didn't rust proof them properly!
     
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  11. ranchero Member

    Messages:
    85
    Location:
    southampton
    what you see looks easy the fun starts when you start cutting out the rust and see what lies beneath. rust is like an iceberg most of it is below the surface out of sight
     
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  12. Wallace

    Wallace Member

    Messages:
    6,584
    Location:
    Staines, Middlesex, England.
    Cool car, learn to weld and fabricate! :D
     
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  13. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    2,165
    Location:
    london
    Thats basically what I did with my old MR2....no repair panels available at the time...forces you to learn and it was a cheap car so I didn't mind if I messed it up but was fine in the end.
     
  14. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    If it’s that bad on top your in for fun on the chassis rails, sills, firewall and boot floor

    what are the foot wells and seat mounts like?
     
  15. Luca King New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Australia, QLD
    not too bad tbh. Don't have any pics of firewall, but no problem there. Boot floor is pretty good, just dirty. Both footwells look pretty good, just super dirty carpet is shocking. I have a bunch of pics of underneath the car and everything looks swell. 86262606_182761033052046_6259115089534648320_n.jpg 86300941_230259494680613_5602845546994728960_n.jpg 86817004_185352349460136_8389309999519629312_n.jpg 86788686_264427684541680_896079342159790080_n.jpg 86667287_404968827008934_2378428867049160704_n.jpg
     
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  16. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    2,165
    Location:
    london
    My experience of Jap cars is they rot badly when the coatings are compromised...but right next to the rot you'll see factory fresh metal where the coatings haven't been compromised....even on the underside too.

    It took me a while to get used to...and the same cars all seem to rot in the same places....and just those places. I'm working on my second Nissan Figaro and the rot is pretty much in the same places as the first car I did!
     
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  17. keithski122 Member

    Messages:
    918
    uk
    Australian cars are a whole different ball game to uk cars rust wise.I used to work for a company that imported vw vans and beetles and it was just the odd bit of rust to weld up compared to the whole bottom 12 inches of uk vans.
     
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  18. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    A bit like many Japanese imports - their underbody protection is either nonexistent or woefully inadequate for UK conditions. :vsad:
     
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  19. qwakers Member

    Messages:
    151
    Location:
    cornwall, united kingdom

    a story i know too well...

    this mr2 is a uk original (which is rare in itself) and had been sat for about 15 years before i got hold of it.

    note that all the welding you can see is at the early tacking stage :D im not that much of a bleeding bodgeist!

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  20. Pigeon_Droppings2 Member

    Messages:
    2,165
    Location:
    london
    What's funny is if you look at my white MR2 project on here I basically had exactly the same repairs to do in exactly the same places :thumbup:
     
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