What size MIG wire for Car Body Repairs?

  1. Arcangel Member

    Messages:
    61
    Ipswich Suffolk
    Hi Guys

    As I havent been on this Forum or done any MIG Welding for years, I'm something of a newbie.

    but my question of the moment, is what size MIG Wire to use for Car Body Repairs 0.6 or 0.8

    My Cousin an experienced MIG Welder reckons 0.8 but he's so good he could weld anything so I would prefer to get some impartial advice, as he hasn't done much with Car Bodies.
     
  2. Robotstar5

    Robotstar5 Casanunda Staff Member

    Messages:
    18,266
    Location:
    Birmingham
    Go with 0.6mm, and welcome :waving: to the forum.
     
  3. Arcangel Member

    Messages:
    61
    Ipswich Suffolk
    Hi Robotstar5

    I've got a BOC Tradesmig (admittedly quite an old one) and I've got full size reels of 0.6 as well as 0.8

    The problem I get with 0.6 is that it keeps buckling up around the feed wheel, so it doesn't seem to be feeding as well as it should, which doesn't seem to happen when I'm using 0.8

    My Cousin seems to get the very same problem which is why he sticks with 0.8 and he is a MIG welder with 30 year experience behind him
     
  4. the snooper

    the snooper getting older by the day

    Messages:
    20,631
    Location:
    Hull UK
    that problem is purely down to how your welder is set up at the wire feed and how good a condition the liner and tip is in
     
  5. Robotstar5

    Robotstar5 Casanunda Staff Member

    Messages:
    18,266
    Location:
    Birmingham
    You have a problem with the wire feed then, there should be almost no gap between the feed rollers and the end of the liner or guide tube (depends on make/type of welder) also, do you have the correct liner fitted for 0.6mm wire and is it clean inside?.
    I assumed you changed contact tips to match the wire being used.
     
  6. Arcangel Member

    Messages:
    61
    Ipswich Suffolk
    You could be onto something there!

    There is quite a big gap between the Roller and the guide tube! which I've never taken notice of before.

    Also do you need a different liner for 0.6 and 0.8?

    I always thought it was the same liner for both (but what do I know!) Though I am using (trying to use) 0.6 Tips for 0.6 wire.
     
    Ianb likes this.
  7. Arcangel Member

    Messages:
    61
    Ipswich Suffolk
    Could be a liner problem? do I need a different one for each size of wire?
     
  8. the snooper

    the snooper getting older by the day

    Messages:
    20,631
    Location:
    Hull UK
    no but they do need replacing from time to time and do cause wire feed issues
     
  9. anto44

    anto44 Member

    Messages:
    1,419
    Location:
    ireland
    I use both. 0.8 is fine for most stuff. With 0.6 ya have to make sure your wire feed is set perfect, if the wire drum hasn't enough tension on it when the wire feed stops it'll kink the wire just before the rollers and when you restart it birdsnests almost straight away.
     
    monky harris likes this.
  10. Arcangel Member

    Messages:
    61
    Ipswich Suffolk
    Thanks for your reply, I doubt if it has ever had a new liner, they don't seem very expensive so I will get one anyway.
     
  11. Arcangel Member

    Messages:
    61
    Ipswich Suffolk
    Now we could be getting somewhere, that seems to be whats happening.

    0.8 Seems a lot more forgiving but with 0.6 the setup needs to be perfect.

    I will do a few experiments and report back

    Thanks to everyone for your advice.
     
  12. dannyp Member

    nether me or my welder like 0.6 it allways seems to foul up somehow so i use 0.8 when 0.6 behaves i can see the advantage of it tho
     
  13. Arcangel Member

    Messages:
    61
    Ipswich Suffolk
    Yes! You are right!

    My Cousin an Expert Mig Welder hates using 0.6 but unlike me (at the moment!) he has the 'Magic Touch' but having said that, he's never done a lot of Mig on Cars especially Car Bodies.

    He's more into making Gates and that sort of stuff.

    I very recently had to repair a hole in the floor of my car, which was an insanely difficult job for me to even attempt, considering my level of experience.

    I couldn't get it from inside, without cutting out the mounting for the Seat Belt, so as I didn't want to do that, I plated it from underneath using 20g Steel.

    The problem was I couldn't get under it properly with my Mask on, so using one of those MIG heads that have the two forks, I lined up the torch got my head out the way and then I pulled the trigger, not plug welding but doing it almost by instinct.

    Amazingly the end result exceeded my expectations and she passed the MOT without any problems.

    But has anyone ever Welded any actual Car Bodywork, using 0.8? Any advice on doing so appreciated or should I endeavor to get it working using 0.6?

    As just like you 0.6 always seems to foul up.

    Mig Welding Started as just a hobby for me, messing about and repairing my own stuff but when word got around, I started getting the 'Do you think you could just Weld this' syndrome.

    When I got a quote to do the patch for the hole in the floor of my Car circa £100! which I ended up doing myself, I have suddenly realised there is lots of money to be made. a Fiver here a Tenner there, welding up peoples grass boxes or making up stuff for their boats, it all adds up!
     
  14. dannyp Member

    usally i just pulse it. its slow but faster than messing about with sorting out the wire. and its still 90% prep 10% welding time wise

    also 0.8 removes any hop of ever running a long seam so you dont try to and stich it in them come bact to it and join the stiches up and that works better.

    those standoff shrouds and 0.6 dosent work much. sometime a bit more torch angel helps and also pull the torch back just as / slightly before you relesase the trigger littel migs seem to suffer burn back on small wire quite badly. and it just help them out a littel.
     
  15. Arcangel Member

    Messages:
    61
    Ipswich Suffolk
    Hi Danny

    That's what I've been doing (more or less) works OK on 20g Steel but on anything thinner, then that where the skill comes in and while I might risk it on my Car, I wouldn't want to risk it on anyone elses.

    Preparation is the 'Secret' alright! unless the metal is clean and bright, then you are just wasting your time.

    Also agree with the burn back on 0.6 as the times when I did have it working OK this was always an issue and very annoying.
     
  16. dannyp Member

    if i was going to use 0.6 again i woud probaly start by spending an hour on the welder. i did get good at welding cars up but since been involved in fabrication more i avoid cars like the plague.

    i've used quite a lot of 0.8 and 1mm ali wire and thats probaly the worst. so if simlar rules apply i would try cleaning out the lance, pull the liner out and blow it out, if the liner is teflon just change it. infact you can buy the stuff in rolls just get one of them. and good welder tips. if you've got a mini mig style torch, it may be worth looking into upgradeing it at some point, the tiny mig tips are hatefull things. the other one that may sound daft is reel size i think the answer for small wire size reels is 5KG.

    the silly littel reels have to go round so fast the brake on the reel seems to give the wirefeed motor some stick on small migs, but 15 KG reels have to much inertia so the brake eeds tightening up to stop the reel unspooling itself when you stop but the wire fed struggels to pull against it. and a 15Kg reel will have gone rusty long before it used. for 0.8 i've found 5KG the right size would imagin the same holds true for 0.6 as there isn't much for the rollers to drive on and when they start slipping the eire gets roughed up and snaggs more soe the rollers chew it up more :( . decent quality wire i also found is worth the extra money as it feeds much smoother and lasts much longer before going rusty
     
  17. optima21 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    3,087
    Location:
    halifax, England
    I use 0.6mm wire. I it seems to be working better now that Im using a steel liner, and using a new tip if it starts playing up seems to work for me. when I first used my clarke 151te, I thought I'd use a teflon liner (thinking it would be lower friction) as opposed to the nylon ones I'd used in my Clarke pro mig 90 for 15 years. after a few hours very intermittant use it was feeding horribly, and it turned out that it was the serration put on the wire by the wire rollers was chewing up the inside of the teflon liner. so now I'm sticking with a steel liner (and the wire isnt)
     
  18. Rocketman Member

    Messages:
    2,520
    Location:
    England Leicestershire
    Never had a problem with .8 or .6 on the Clarke pro90 on my car repairs. Obviously on car body work when you start hitting less than 1mm thick bodywork the 0.6mm helps.
     
  19. PhillipM

    PhillipM Member

    Messages:
    1,883
    Rotherham
    To be honest, I'd go with 0.8mm over 0.6mm, I have a welder with both on, and unless the feed setup is 100% spot on for the 0.6mm it has issues all the time, don't get me wrong, when it's working it's great on the really thin stuff, especially if you're having to be careful about how far you cut back and end up cleaning up pitted steel to weld to - but I've welded all the way down to 1/32" sheet metal with 0.8mm and pulsing just fine.
     
  20. Arcangel Member

    Messages:
    61
    Ipswich Suffolk

    Hi Danny

    Both my reels are 15kg 0.8 & 0.6 which came with the MIG when I bought it, so I think I will buy a new liner and see what happens.
     
Advertisements