Welding Gun Technique

  1. malcolm

    malcolm & Clementine the Cat

    Messages:
    9,134
    Location:
    Bedford UK
    What are your thoughts on welding gun technique? There is a comment over on http://www.clubgti.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=84980&PN=1&TPN=1
    I tend to use the technique on http://www.mig-welding.co.uk/learning-mig.htm I'll give zig zag a try and see what it looks like.

    What gun techniques do you guys use?
     
  2. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,337
    Somerset
    Depends on the type of weld, gaps, welder settings...

    A basic straigh push, circles, left to right weave, a push stop push... allsorts!

    If its a big weld, sometimes i just do different patterns beceause i get bored :)
     
  3. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,337
    Somerset
    Dont listen Malc, circles are fine, but it depends on the weld deing done, i use circles if im butt welding say a piece of plate to the edge of a piece of box.
    The circle movement allows more heat and metal to be deposited, whilst keeping the edge of the plate from getting to hot, and burning through.
    What does this Neo guy do anyway?
     
  4. ben Member

    Messages:
    1
    I just bought my first mig welder, and I have been using the welding technique you suggest on your site.

    I have no problems with it, but the weld doesn't seem to be penetrating quite as much as yours did on the photographs you used. Im using minimum power settings and a fairly high wire speed. The steel is 1.5mm sheet
     
  5. malcolm

    malcolm & Clementine the Cat

    Messages:
    9,134
    Location:
    Bedford UK
    Thanks Hitachimad - Your advice is always good. I find it difficult to put into words (and even photos) what works for me, but my lack of formal welding education always worries me. I've ordered a book about welding. Figure I have this website so I should do a little reading and learn something.

    Welcome to the forum Ben. There is way too much penetration in my welding photos and I need to take some new ones. You should be aiming to avoid any sharp edges that might cause fatigue. The minimum penetration that gets rid of the edges of the steel on the reverse side is the goal.

    Depending on your welder, minimum might be a bit low for 1.5mm steel. Try increasing the power by one notch, then adjust the wire speed so it doesn't vaporise, but doesn't push you away from the workpiece. A nice comfortable sizzle is what you'd aim for.

    Post some photos of your welds (reverse side too) and we can give some more directed advice.
     
  6. kernowcam Member

    Messages:
    78
    South West uk
    Seeing the comment about style and getting bored with big welds, reminded me of years ago watching an oil rig in the north sea being welded to its legs. I was photographing it and was there for a while. Theguys were all mexican!! and worked really hard 12hr shifts producing top quality beautuful welds. They were BIG welds and multiple passes. All stick work and can remember 20 - 30 power cables going from our crane ship along the walkway to these massive tube stumps, brightly lit at night with the North sea not far below, with the sparks everywhere. Amasing sight. must see if I have a photo for you.
    Did some interesting photos of crack testing. Seem to rember they put a flourescent liquid on the white painted welds and could see any problems?
     
  7. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,337
    Somerset
    Sounds like a dye-penetrant test Ian...
    Once welded you clean the area with a solvent like cleaner, spray on a bright red dye, leave for a minuite then clean the area again. The red dye finds its way into any flaws, then you spray on a white 'developer' which reacts with the red, leaving bright pink bit in any flaws so you can see them. http://www.lawson-his.co.uk/scripts... Non Destructive Testing Dye Penetrant System
     
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