Welding a car starter in south america

  1. Dave's Garage New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Switzerland
    Hey Guys

    I was in south america recently to learn spanish. I am always very interested in metalindustry in other countrys. I asked the director of my spanish school if he knows some industry. He brought me to a very interesting place.



    There was a machinist who repairs car starters and other motors. The motors have worn out brass bearing sleeves. Normally people replace just the sleeves. What he does is a little different. He just welds the shaft of the rotor to increase the diameter. After that he turns the shaft to fit it to the worn sleeve.

    Ive never seen something like that. But some people have told me that is not so rare.
    file-1.jpg file-2.jpg file-3.jpg file-4.jpg file-5.jpg file-6.jpg file-7.jpg file.jpg
     
    Kent, indy4x, Jlg and 2 others like this.
  2. MattH

    MattH Member

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    3,019
    Location:
    Bristol
    Don’t buy a used lathe from this chap!
     
    eil, Dave's Garage, zx9 and 4 others like this.
  3. AdrianH

    AdrianH Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,617
    Location:
    near Blackburn.
    I would have thought it better to replace the bronze bushes but I guess it depends on the parts price, buying some bar PB bar stock and making some must be better. Unless the finish on the shaft is mirror finish then that would soon eat through already worn bushes.

    I guess the only redeeming thing is that a starter would only turn a few revolutions every time the engine starts
     
  4. roofman

    roofman "Hey!! calm down calm down"

    Messages:
    5,514
    Location:
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    Yikes! that poor lathe:(..still if its a means to an end and puts bread on the table and all that then go for it.
     
    stalwart_hmlc likes this.
  5. wyn

    wyn Member

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    2,811
    Location:
    Cardiff
    The headstock bearings are going to be wrecked if he's not earthing directly on the job.
     
  6. earthman Member

    Messages:
    209
    Thanks for posting, I'll watch the video later, looks interesting.
     
  7. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    [​IMG]

    I expected @Parm to have a lot to say about this ^^ , but apparently not......:scared: :D

    It just shows how other countries manage without the swaddling H & S laws we have imposed on us here. :worms
     
    skotl and Parm like this.
  8. Cobbler

    Cobbler Codger bodger

    Messages:
    3,866
    Location:
    Gloucestershire UK
    As Adrian says, surely better to replace the bushes. If you have to do that, it wouldn't be difficult to make some sort of jig with a couple of centres to fit the armature in so you didn't use the lathe, still a bodge job though, it looked as rough as a badgers arse.
     
    hunter27 likes this.
  9. 500e

    500e Always buy fire insurance a flood is hard to start

    Messages:
    3,235
    Location:
    Somerset UK
    At least the workshop is tidy & clean it's a start
     
  10. Justme

    Justme Member

    Messages:
    2,602
    Location:
    Pwllheli Wales
    What about the ultra thin bushing sleeves you can get?
     
  11. Parm

    Parm I only give advice if I know

    Messages:
    6,841
    Location:
    Towcester

    I haven’t been on the forum much recently. Been a bit busy with stuff
     
    slim_boy_fat likes this.
  12. sardine

    sardine Member

    Messages:
    2,751
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire
    If the shaft is worn you would have to build it up, but at least cover up the motor windings and lathe bed to stop any spatter ?

    I would have turned it vertical as soon as I had welded it to get the heat travelling away from the windings.

    You still need to fit a new bushing or ream out the old one .

    So all in all this is the work of a bodger.
     
    hunter27 likes this.
  13. Kent

    Kent Member

    Messages:
    9,385
    Location:
    Bowland, Lanacshire,UK
    Back to reality guys. It's Brazil, its not like new parts are freely available from stock.

    To be honest I used to work for a firm where we did a lot of shaft repairs from big old weaving looms and the std procedure involved build up on the lathe. If your spatter sticks that far and on an oily machine you need some lessons because that's some serious spatter!
     
    MattF and reb78 like this.
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