Welding 1.5mm MS sheet

  1. Mike B Member

    Messages:
    154
    Location:
    North Wales
    I’m looking for advice from the collective of seasoned welders we have here. I have a steel top from a roll cab and having replaced the toll cab I need to extend the top.

    it’s a mild steel sheet folded on all four sides. The front of the sheet has a few mends in it to create a ledge to stop tools falling off the worktop. I need to make the worktop 5” deeper (as in the front to back dimension). I’m wondering if I could cut it and weld a 5” deep length of steel in place. The top is 54” long with 1.5” downturns. Currently 1.5mm.
    Do you reckon I could weld this in really small sections to keep heat to a minimum or is this going to warp regardless and look rubbish? I’ve seen the guys on Project Binky effectively doing a series of tack welds to create a seam. Thoughts?

    If not welding my next option would be a plate hidden beneath and the whole thing riveted together with solid aluminium rivets. Ally and steel are likely to corrode over time. Not ideal.

    failing that, should I just buy a sheet of steel and make a new one from scratch?
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  2. James1979 Member

    Messages:
    480
    Location:
    Orkney
    Id cut it down the middle and weld your new strip in like you said. I'm assuming you'll MIG it, but you may have better results with tig. Get the gap set right and put plenty of tacks in then like you say just close the gaps up gradually in a pattern to minimise heat (like wheelnuts on a car!). Once it's done, blend it back and it's done.

    Thin stuff is harder than thicker stock i think but go steady and think about your heat and you'll be fine.
     
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  3. mike 109444

    mike 109444 Member

    Messages:
    4,254
    uk Bristol
    If you put a joggle in the new piece you could then punch holes ever 1" or so and plug weld it. Less heat and the lip formed by the joggle will stiffen up the joint.
     
  4. Morrisman

    Morrisman Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    2,072
    Location:
    Staffordshire, England
    If you can clamp it down to something solid it won’t move much. You’ll need long clamps to reach in though.

    You can peen the welds while they are still hot to stretch them a bit and further help prevent any distortion. Then flap disc them flat once all is done. :D
     
    Mike B likes this.
  5. anto44

    anto44 Member

    Messages:
    1,355
    Location:
    ireland
    Instead of riveting a back plate on to the back you could glue a plate onto the back of it. There's plenty of glues capable of holding something like that.
     
    Mike B likes this.
  6. tom2207 Member

    Messages:
    1,604
    Location:
    uk northern ireland
    to be honest . Id be making a new one .... yes you could join it , etc etc ,, but it would bug me every time I looked at it , so new it would be ,,, maybe tread plate , alloy , stainless , or powder coated steel , but it would be new ,,, or a ply top depending on its use.
     
    Mike B likes this.
  7. Mike B Member

    Messages:
    154
    Location:
    North Wales
    A really good idea but I’m not sure of my ability to create the joggle! Is it formed using a bender and a pair of bends in very close proximity? Or a specific die in a bead roller?

    If it were a flat top I’d make new, maybe a bit thicker, but this one has the raised lip which might be a pain to do. By the time I do that detail and weld a filler plate for the sides I couldve had a go at welding this. Plus this top has the snap on logo embossed into it which will help if I sell. Ideally it’ll still look factory.
     
  8. Mike B Member

    Messages:
    154
    Location:
    North Wales
    if I glued what would I fill any gaps in the joins with? More glue?
     
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