Vice repair.. Worth trying or not?

  1. Aesgarth Member

    Messages:
    416
    Northumberland
    I have a snapped record vice... Is it worth a try repairing it? I have a 250a MIG and 250a TIG/stick at my disposal, but this is a far thicker chunk of metal than I've ever worked with before.

    Obviously I'm going to have to grind out a V and do multiple passes. Not sure on preheat requirements or what rods/wire to use though...

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  2. mike os

    mike os just a little insane.....

    Messages:
    5,873
    Location:
    North Wales
    I would say bin it... yes it could be fixed but how much effort would it be and it will never be as strong
     
  3. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark Member

    Messages:
    11,191
    Location:
    England
    No.
    I just did a repair, it was for fun.

    But the cost of a No. 2 vice make sit not worth it.

    Suck it up to experience.

    The cost of decent rods or wire alone is costly.
     
  4. Aesgarth Member

    Messages:
    416
    Northumberland
    I'm not too concerned about the time involved, I have lots of that. Nor am I particularly concerned about the cost of consumables - especially if it's something I may be able to use in future - I may even already have it... I have a fair selection of oddball rods and filler wire...
     
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  5. Aesgarth Member

    Messages:
    416
    Northumberland
    As a for fun exercise, how did you go about doing it?
     
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  6. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

    Messages:
    9,976
    Location:
    Towcester
    I would say bin it as it will never be the same and you’ll probably be nervous giving it full tilt with anything.

    However, if your like me and time is free and materials relatively cheap then definitely have a go at fixing It.

    You can’t break it anymore and you’ll probably learn something
     
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  7. Aesgarth Member

    Messages:
    416
    Northumberland
    This is what I'm thinking. I'll buy a replacement anyway but I'd like to have a go at a repair, just for the sake of it.
     
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  8. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

    Messages:
    9,976
    Location:
    Towcester
    In that case, read up and press on

    I’ve only ever done one repair on a cracked Dutch oven pan. Cleaned and V prepped pan, Heated it up on a big propane stove and then brazed the crack. Covered in a big fire blanket and allowed to cool over night.

    Still going strong several years latter
     
  9. WorkshopChris

    WorkshopChris Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    4,519
    Location:
    South East Essex
    If you do decide to go with a repair it may be worth dilling and tapping to give you a mechanical repair will make locating and clamping much easier once you start to v out for weld or braze.
     
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  10. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

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    4,679
    Location:
    NE London - UK
  11. hermetic

    hermetic Member

    Messages:
    64
    Yorkshire UK
    Yup, fix it! Drill and tap for two or more big allen screws into the thich cast, then v the crack and braze it, or even tig braze it if you can. Good vices are not cheap! If it was a chinese one I would bin it for sure, but it aint!
    Phil
     
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  12. Aesgarth Member

    Messages:
    416
    Northumberland
    That's a very good point, I'll do that...

    Thanks for that, very interesting read.
    TIG brazing sounds like a good choice for me, since I have the rods already and I'm kind of familiar with the process.
     
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  13. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark Member

    Messages:
    11,191
    Location:
    England
    IMG_0749.JPG

    A friend tried to braze it.
    Not enough heat was possible, so it had no penetration.

    IMG_0926.JPG

    It failed, only after I painted it.

    IMG_0930.JPG

    So I got some steel 6mm bar. Drilled out the 2 sections, as deep as I could go.
    Brazed the 2 pins in place.
    IMG_1311.JPG

    The "V" cut two parts as deep 1/3 on each wide side and about 1/4" on the sides.

    Made a jig to hold the parts and using 3mm Welding rods, as recommended by a welding place. Slowly welded the parts together.
    Removing the slag at each pass. Any slag that was pitted was removed using a Dremmel tool.
    Untill the "V" was full.
    Then gave one final pass.

    IMG_1566.JPG

    Then using flap discs smoothed of the access.

    Repainted it and it is now back in use as a "Light Duty" vice.

    IMG_1577.JPG

    It was not worth the funds spent on it, as it was a cheep vice and I have plenty of others to use.
    But for the fun to repair, it was worth it.
    I did do a series of post about it.
     
  14. The_Yellow_Ardvark

    The_Yellow_Ardvark Member

    Messages:
    11,191
    Location:
    England
    I must stress.
    It was for the fun and experience.

    I do not class it as a full strength repair.
    I am only going to be using it as a light weight vice.

    If I needed a heavier duty one, I would junk that one and brought a better one.
     
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  15. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    5,241
    UK London
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  16. gt6s Member

    Messages:
    704
    Location:
    Newtownards Co Down Northern Ireland
    Waste of time & money BUY /\ STEEL VICE
     
  17. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    5,241
    UK London
    If you are going to fix it, you could drill and tap a couple of pretty sturdy through bolts from the front jaw face into those meaty corners of the slide. I'm guessing a 6 - 8 mm high tensile bolt would be ideal. Once the parts are re-located, V out the join leaving just enough meat to really crank on the tensioning bolts without distorting the thinned out section. Then braze or weld it up. If you weld it it will probably end up brittle but definitely have glassy hard surfaces you'd have to grind to tidy up.
     
  18. Aesgarth Member

    Messages:
    416
    Northumberland
    Today I drilled, tapped and countersunk for 2 M8 bolts. (A2-70 THE) is what I'm using because that's what I have. If I have an hour spare tomorrow I'll grind it out ready to braze it back together. For the sake of making this a project thread this is my starting point...

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  19. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

    Messages:
    5,241
    UK London
    Probably too late now but don’t forget you want maximum thickness and thread depth so ideally go in at an appropriate angle. Also a cap head will allow you to hide the finished fixing.

    So glad you decided to have a crack at fixing it. No pun intended....
     
  20. Aesgarth Member

    Messages:
    416
    Northumberland
    I did go in at an angle, though on reflection I should have gone deeper, I don't think I can do that now without ruining the threads I've already cut. The holes are countersunk deep enough that I should be able to cover them over when I'm finished. I'm hoping when I'm finished the repair will be almost invisible.
     
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