vertical welding

  1. mfleury Member

    Messages:
    2
    Is it true that if you start from the bottom of a vertical weld and weld upwards (fighting gravity) that you will have a stronger weld?
     
  2. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,316
    Somerset
    Yes.

    But its not realy practical on anything thinner than about 4mm.
    Use a very low setting, and a smooth upwards weave across the joint.
     
  3. mfleury Member

    Messages:
    2
    vertical welds

    In reference to the last question, I was welding 1/2" steel aprox 7" long. I chamfered both sides of the plate leaving about a 1/8" root gap. I made two passes starting from the top to the bottom.(one 1/4" weld to help fill the root gap and about a 1/2" wide weld to blend the two pieces together on both sides of the plate) I also fabricated two (per side) 4-1/2" x 1/2" gussets also chamfered and welded the same way spaced about 5" apart from each other. The brackets hold a 600lb bumper/winch assembly to a frame of a well drilling truck. The bumper assembly bolts to the frame with 4 , 3/4" x 3" grade 8 bolts on each side. Do you think the welding I did will hold the bumper to the frame?
     
  4. Hitch

    Hitch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,316
    Somerset
    If you did it downhand, i'd be dubious of the strength on 1/2" plate. Did you get full penetration on the root and the cap?
    I imagine there will be quite a bit of force and vibration on the joint, and the last thing you want will be a weld faliure.

    As we cant see the welds, it will be difficult to say either way. All i can say, if your happy, leave it. If your not, redo it.
     
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