Tooling for a Warco 240 lathe

  1. I just bought a Warco 240 from JonE (not picked it up yet due to the weather) but need to buy some tooling as well as a MT2 drill chuck and live centre.

    The choice seems to be infinite but as I'm a total novice don't know where to start.

    For tooling should I go for HSS tools or ones with a carbide insert for example?

    A problem I think I would have with HSS tooling would be regrinding as I've got no experience of that.

    For the drill chuck and live centre I don't need super accuracy but also don't want to end up with junk?

    I wont be doing a lot of work, just making up various parts/tools to help with my car restoration projects etc.

    Last of all, does anyone have any idea where I can get offcuts in Fife to play around with?
     
    fizzy likes this.
  2. JonE Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    Central Scotland
    Hi Jim, will have a look when I'm back home, am sure I'll have some extra bits I can throw in at the weekend to get you started..

    Regarding tooling, I've always had a mixture of both types. I would say it is easier to get a good finish on a small lathe with sharp HSS, but inserts are convenient, and probably a worthwhile baseline to compare your results against. (Honestly, if you have a bench grinder, then HSS tools are pretty straightforward to grind).
     
  3. gaz1

    gaz1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    9,171
    Location:
    westyorkshire
    did you read richards thread post on the ml10 lathe as has alot of info on there as well
     
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  4. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

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  5. Kram

    Kram Member

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Sussex
    Hss is ok, look out for a good set of ready to use small boring tools. I rarely use hss for any bores bigger than 10mm. I am rubbish at grinding it, and grinding from a large blank is painful. H01 inserts always give me a much better finish, but they are extremely sharp.
    Chinese stuff is massively cheaper, and generally very good. Ive only had one unusable item out of 100's which was a bent er11 collet chuck.
    Recently got a few MT1 drills, 3, 6.6 and 9mm and mt1 sleeve, and a mt2 er11 collet holder that I keep a centre in for tailstock, all around fiver each on ebay. Dislike drill chuck if I can avoid, but nothing wrong with them. Er32 collet chuck for spindle.

    I prefer carbide tools when I can. Suggest a ccmt 06 size holder for external and boring to be the main tools. Vcmt tool for tighter external angles like v pulleys, SVVCN is the holder - you want neutral with insert in the middle.
    Get plain inserts and h01 aluminium type for mirror finish on non ferros

    Cant recommend any parting tool this model lathe is no good at it. Aldi bandsaw and face part after. That hopefully will change with some modifications, mine is still a work in progress.
     
  6. Hopefuldave Intergalactic pot-mender

    Messages:
    1,151
    Location:
    The Shed of Danger, surrey, England
    Grinding HSS isn't that hard, helps if your grinder has a decent tool rest and decent wheels on it - loads of YouTube videos, Mr Pete has a few good'uns. Only ones I struggle with are threading tools, external's not so bad as there's a decent bit of edge to measure angles, internal are a bit of a buzzard! You'd want a gauge (couple of quid off EvilBay) with the right angles on it, 60* for Metric / UN, 55* if you're cutting Whitworth / BSF, etc. A decent loupe or magnifier (and good lighting!) helps, as does a final hone on a *fine* stone or diamond lap

    *Insert* carbide tooling's good but does need more power and rigidity in the lathe, the cheap brazed-on carbide sets from most of the hobbyist outlets are carp - poor geometry, inferior grade carbide, blunt - can be improved with a green-grit grinding wheel followed by a diamond hone, but more hassle than grinding HSS...

    Make sure you measure the toolpost slot before buying too-big tooling, and if you have a QCTP from base of the slot at lowest adjustment to centre height (e.g. bring the tailstock up with a dead centre in it, measure base of slot to point) - my BX (250-200) size QCTP only *just* goes low enough if I fill the slots with 16mm / 5/8" tools!

    Helpful Hint: If you have one of the normal turret toolposts, you'll need to shim tools to centre height - once you've got it right put a laccy band around tool and shims (pieces of flat, snippets of beer can etc) when you take it out of the toolpost, saves grovelling in the chip tray for the Right Shims next time you use it!

    If you do have a QCTP, well done! You'll want more holders, always, forever... I know I do.

    If it's the WM240 with the variable speed DC motor, beware of low-sped, high-torque use (ride-on model railway wheels are a killer, 8"+ cast-iron with a hard skin...), it can cook the motor (and that usually takes out the controller board, spendy) - Very Good Idea to add an external fan bolted to the brushes end of the motor for when the internal fan's moving too slowly to move much air, and if it doesn't have one a fuseholder on the back of the electrics box spliced into one of the motor leads (10A won't blow in normal use, will if the motor's stalled or shorts out - keep a few spares on hand, or use a 10 amp *DC* circuit breaker instead).

    Dave H. (the other one)
     
  7. Wow, thanks guys for all the suggestions and tips. I'll go and have a look for the "ml10 lathe" thread too.
     
  8. Hood

    Hood Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    9,989
    Location:
    Carnoustie, Scotland
    HSS can be fine depending on what you will be turning, if harder steels, stainless etc then it soon becomes tiresome regrinding them.
    For a small lathe and carbide you want a fairy sharp geometry and definitely a positive insert, the downside is positive inserts are single sided so you only get 2 (or 3 if triangular) edges from an insert. Personally I think a good choice for inserts for a small lathe are DCMT, they are fairly strong, more so than VBMT and have a similar back clearance to avoid trapping swarf that you may get with DCMT, they also allow profiling.
    For a nose radius 0.4mm would probably be the best compromise on a small lathe.
    Personally I don't buy Chinese inserts, they are seemingly getting better but any I have had do not last anywhere as long as a decent branded one. Cutwel sell Korloy which are Korean and are decent, they also started selling YG ones which I thought would be good, YG powdered metal taps are excellent but their inserts didn't last for me, they were on par or maybe slightly better than the best of the Chinese inserts I have used but not a patch on Kolroy or any of the more established names such as Sandvik, Kennametal, Seco etc.
     
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  9. gaz1

    gaz1 Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    9,171
    Location:
    westyorkshire
  10. Kram

    Kram Member

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Sussex
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?LH_PrefLoc=2&_from=R40&_nkw=h01+carbide&_sacat=0

    These are the sharp ones. Once the tip wears out or chips I generally run a diamond wheel on the top to remove the top rake, then they are fine for steel. They last ages on aluminium. The cheaper general purpose dont last as long.

    The dc motor is a pain. Generally no good for turning under 500rpm and much better at 1000. It has no torque even with the 4.6:1 reduction. The best upgrade for this lathe is a 3ph motor and vfd, it can be done for £150. Mine cost £500, and two months fitting it, and not yet complete.. I went very over the top with the 1.5kw 6 pole motor but it has massive amount of torque at 250rpm with 1:1 gearing. Soon I will have 3:1 pulley fitted for more :D
     
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  11. Thanks for the info, are you documenting your mods anywhere, also is there any other sites with more info on the 240?
     
  12. Kram

    Kram Member

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Sussex
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  13. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    Checked today [sun's shining :o , but still a bit Baltic :rolleyes: ] - I have one but it's MT1 I think, although it's an odd beast. Looks to have a slight taper near the business end, then goes to parallel shank? :dontknow:

    @RaceDiagnostics Clearly no use to you, though. :vsad:
     
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  14. Thanks for checking anyway slim_boy.
     
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  15. skotl

    skotl Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    6,676
    Location:
    Edinburgh, UK
    I'm in Dalmeny and work in Kirkcaldy - can drop some offcuts off, if you like, one morning or evening?
     
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  16. Turbo Member

    Messages:
    3,445
    Location:
    Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
    I have a Myford ML7 & started off by using the HSS & brazed carbide tooling that came with it. I could never get the carbide tooling to cut properly & it left a poor finish. The HSS worked ok but it was getting tiresome spending ages grinding a tool for a few minutes machining!

    After seeing Doubleboosts Youtube review on the Chinese carbide tip tooling from Banggood I took the plunge and bought 2 sets to cover most turning & boring operations. It has been a complete revelation, perfect finish every time, can take deeper cuts & if you damage a tip a few seconds will replace it - no messing around having to regrind a HSS tool!
    The supplied Chinese tips wear quite well, the only time I've had a problem was on some unknown grade of hard steel & I had to use some Kennametal ones I got on ebay.

    I even managed to use the carbide tip parting off tool successfully, no need for a rear toolpost!

    So don't believe all those tales of tipped tooling not working on small lathes - use the correct geometry tips & they work brilliantly! :thumbup:
     
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  17. Hi Skotl, that is very generous, thankyou very much. Ill PM my details over.
     
    skotl likes this.
  18. Time to make space for the lathe, the garage is pretty tightly packed.

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    Only really one thing in here that doesn't strictly belong, my beer fridge.

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    So time to clear it out, see how bad the floor level is!

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    Space is just big enough. Anyone remember that I had an offer of this lathe for free a couple of years ago, it would never have fitted but would have been fantastic.

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    Some new shelves and level flooring sorted out with stuff lying around, trying to keep my spend to a minimum.

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    Next, I will sort out some extra lighting. I think I can scavenge some flexi led strips and a psu from my daughters product design final year project.
     
  19. Kram

    Kram Member

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Sussex
  20. Thanks Kram, that all looks great!
     
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