tacking stud to panel

  1. GerInEire New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland
    Hello, my car is 20 years old and there are a few serious dents from getting hit in parking lots. I can't afford a professional job but I need to fix them so I was going to get a gun-type stud welder, but then I figured it makes more sense to get a small gasless welder that I could use for other small jobs too. I saw a video on YouTube where the ground was attached to a pliers, the pliers held the stud to the car panel and the torch then welded the stud on. I was wondering if that's a safe way to do it, I mean, if you accidentally touched the ground you'd get the current, wouldn't you? What's the right way to tack the studs to the panels?
    Thanks for any advice,
    Gerard
     
  2. rtbcomp

    rtbcomp Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    18,615
    Location:
    Sheffield UK
    Welcome to the forum.

    The welding earth (return) and mains earth (ground) should be isolated fro one another. MIG welding voltages are safe, but you might get a tingle so it makes sense to wear gloves (also from an anti-burning point) and rubber soled shoes.
     
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  3. GerInEire New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland
    That's great rtbcomp, many thanks. 220V over here so I'll make sure I've got the gloves and rubber soles.
     
  4. rtbcomp

    rtbcomp Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    18,615
    Location:
    Sheffield UK
    The voltage is stepped down inside the welder to about 50v, although when you have sparks and a transformer or inductor you can get higher voltages produced.
     
  5. mike 109444

    mike 109444 Member

    Messages:
    4,162
    uk Bristol
    Get a bag of 1 inch nails and a slid hammer
     
    • 20140830_163845.jpg
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  6. GerInEire New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland
    Thanks Mike, that picture is exactly what I'm hoping to be able to do, although I'm worried I won't have the skill; I'll need to get a scrap panel and practise on that first. It's good to know the 1 inch nails are sufficient, those coated studs that the stud welder guns use are pretty expensive and wouldn't be as generally useful as nails.
     
  7. mike 109444

    mike 109444 Member

    Messages:
    4,162
    uk Bristol
    Make sure you use a pair of pliers or similar to hold nails.
    I made up an attachment for my slide hammer like in pic.
    There was a replacement mig shroud made I think by Sealey that had a tube on the side that yo dropped your stud into and it would then be just in front of the wire tip ready to weld but was expensive for what it was.
     
    • stud puller.jpg
  8. mike 109444

    mike 109444 Member

    Messages:
    4,162
    uk Bristol
    Thought to I had a pic of shroud.
     
    • 13928_studweld_action400.jpg
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  9. GerInEire New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland
    I found a shroud like your picture at https://www.eastwood.com/welders/stud-welders.html. There are several interesting options there too.

    I like that little attachment at the end of the slide hammer, I have seen it in the videos of the Harbor Freight stud gun sold in the USA, and the chinese Hunter 007 one that is sold on Amazon.co.uk as the MosaicAL stud gun kit. I can't find that attachment on regular slide hammer kits, so I'm tempted to get the stud gun kit, but I think the gasless welder is certainly much more generally useful. I like the attachment you made for your slide hammer, I'm not sure I could make a good one like that though. I was thinking of using something like a drill chuck key to fit on to the end of the slide hammer, I haven't figured out how to do that and I'm not sure that it would have the grip to pull the nails. However I do have a good vice grips already, so maybe I could get by with that. My original idea was to just get the MosaicAL kit, the options are getting confusing, heh. Of course, with a bit more money to spend, it would get easier... I'll have to see how far I can stretch the budget; the car looks pretty beat up so I guess I've got to just accept it's gonna hurt my pocket a bit to do an acceptable job on it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2019
  10. GerInEire New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland
    Wow, seek and ye shall find. I just saw this video on youtube (), the guy is using a $10 keyless chuck on the end of his slide hammer, it seems to pull studs really well. Now I just need to find out what size the thread is on the cheap Silverline slide hammer and get a chuck that fits that. Could anything go wrong with that?
     
  11. Melvyn Best Member

    Messages:
    195
    Location:
    Cambridge
    You can also weld washers onto the panel standing on edge, leaves a nice ring to hook on a slide hammer
     
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  12. GerInEire New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland
    Nice one Melvyn, thanks; that Silverline slide hammer has a M12 thread and it's a lot harder to find a chuck that will mount onto that than I expected so the washer may be the way to go.
     
  13. stuvy

    stuvy Member

    The cheap back yard fix is drill a small hole

    Screw in a big headed screw

    Pull it out jerking as you go

    Been through dozens of cars in the last that people have done this to
     
  14. GerInEire New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland
    My dad has a large soldering iron, there's large gauge solder there too, and a brazing torch with the dials and an oxygen bottle and what I'm guessing is an acetylene bottle. I guess that attaching studs to the car with them would be impractical since it seems you'd need to be able to hold the torch, the stud and the filler (or solder). But if it could be done, would the solder be strong enough to hold the studs (or nails) while pulling them? Brazing seems like it could work, and less likely to burn through the panel than the welder, probably less skill required too...
    Thanks for any thoughts.
     
  15. johnser

    johnser Member

    Messages:
    1,832
    Location:
    North Cornwall
    If it's just a few you need to do, you can weld the non galvanized nails pointy end onto the bodywork and just use a regular claw hammer to slide up the nail and tonk it out. Not ideal but works alright and saves buying a slide hammer especially.
     
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  16. GerInEire New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland
    Thanks johnser, I guess the welder is the way to go alright.
     
  17. Dutch Welder Member

    Messages:
    245
    Location:
    Oss, The Netherlands
    Most chucks use a 1/2 unf thread I believe, so you could probably create something with a M12 Coupler nut(the long ones, which are used to conenct 2 pieces of threaded rod) onto which you weld a 1/2 unf bolt.
    Then you can screw in the slide hammer , and have a male 1/2 unf thread on the end.

    I have made a slide hammer at work, and it uses a m16 thead on the end. Depending on which things I have to pull I can screw on an assortment of adapters which all use a M16 coupler nut as a base.
    I have made ones that can be slid into a bearing (with the bearing case already broken) then turned, locking it between the inner and outer races, I have a claw type for removing stubborn filter housings etcetera.
     
  18. GerInEire New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland
    Nice idea Dutch Welder, I had given up on the idea of getting a slide hammer but that idea reopens the possibility.
    Thanks.
     
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