Screws when I want nails (cosmetics)

  1. julianf

    julianf Member

    Messages:
    4,065
    Location:
    devon, uk
    I'm doing another floor like this one -

    DSCF7579_zps5ee9786d.jpg DSCF7582_zps33d2eb1e.jpg

    I'd like to use the same, traditional, nails, that look like this -

    [​IMG]

    But the floor is on an upper level and I don't want to be hammering up there.

    I'm wondering what my best alternative is.

    The photo of then nail above isn't actually what I have. Mine are the coffin shaped ones that bind on the wood, and stop pull through.

    Cut wire nails, or those pin head decking screws would pull though, I think, as the boards twist and bow.

    Possibly some sort of steel (grey) slot headded screw would do it. Or maybe put an acro under each joist as I hammer in the nail... But that will take forever...

    (Old timbers, set into cob walls - I just don't want to shake it all up more than I have to)
     
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  2. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

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    Pilot drill then nail?
     
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  3. TechnicAl

    TechnicAl Member

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  4. cheb Forum Supporter

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    Outer Hebrides
    If you deeply countersank each screw you could either glue a metal disc into each hole or use a blob of metal loaded epoxy resin.
     
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  5. DAPPH

    DAPPH Member

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    1,890
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    Near to Cross Hands Llanelli SouthWales GB
    Even to the extent of two small pilot hole so the web between the two collapses under a little bit of pressure .

    I would do it different though , using stainless screws , torx head if available, lubricating the screws with bee's or candle wax , in sunken pre drilled holes using a proper profiled hole drill ( have a few handy , for drilling oak can be rather hard on such bits & and put glued in oak plugs over the top of them with the grains running the same as the planks .

    These are what I'm talking of if you use a brace & bit rather than a power tool you can wind them in a hole that has a countersunk bottom nice & tight without damaging anything & glue in a plug that can be cut off with a pull saw or take them off with a chisel or sander if you cut the plug stockwood thin enough .

    https://www.fastenright.com/securit...tx-countersunk-self-drill-security-screw/tx07
     
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  6. mtt.tr

    mtt.tr Member

    Messages:
    956
    Essex England
    i would think you are best counter boring the screws then just glue a nail head in the bore
     
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  7. colnerov

    colnerov Member

    Messages:
    3,186
    Location:
    Nr Gatwick UK
    Round head wood screw, don't bury it, then grind the top off down to the bottom of the slot. This doesn't make for easy lifting later, OK if it's not going to be you.

    Colin
     
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  8. 8ob

    8ob Forum Supporter

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    4,321
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    I would try one of those nails on the end of an air chisel, it would get them home without beating the joists to death. May have to grind up a chisel to suit the head of the nail but they are as cheap as chips.

    Bob

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

    Messages:
    9,365
    Location:
    Towcester
    Will that technique vibrate the hell out of the floor?
     
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  10. Olderisbetter

    Olderisbetter Forum Supporter

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    I have screwed thick flooring down usually old scaffold planks and made the screw go 20mm from the surface and super glued used cut nails that have been chopped down to give the effect of a old floor finish
     
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  11. roofman

    roofman Purveyor of fine English buckets and mops

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    I love the look of that floor mate..looking at the fire hearth height have you fitted them boards over the existing floor?
     
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  12. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

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    I’ve seen it for real, it really suits and fits well with the age and style of the building
     
  13. julianf

    julianf Member

    Messages:
    4,065
    Location:
    devon, uk
    No. Whole lot is new. Even the sleeper walls underneath were rebuilt. The lime plaster you can see on the walls is new too (but I didn't build the plastered walls - someone did them in the 1800s or before - noone is too sure)

    Floor is structural. I costed it up, and it was cheaper to put in this one than to lay even the most budget laminate stuff over chipboard.

    Hearth is a constructional hearth (is that the right name, I forget?) - ie solid down to the ground. Hearth is all correct doc J clearence etc.

    Slate is set at that level for two reasons - a) it's less imposing, and, b) it means you don't have to trim the edge, where the holes are (that the cussion fixings or dowels attatch)

    If you took up the boards (or the slate was higher) you would see the line of holes along the facing edge.

    I have in mind that the scaffold boards cost me £65, and the full size slate bed snooker table was the princely sum of £26 off eBay.

    I think the tub of wax was the single most expensive item.


    As a side note, I used the same slate under the Rayburn in our kitchen. But on the cooker, you want to raise it up slightly anyway. So I had to trim and finish the edge... With a 4" grinder... : ( I remember having to turn the slab with an engine crane and then line up the cut on the other side as best as possible, as I was too skint, at the time, to just go and buy a 9"!
     
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  14. julianf

    julianf Member

    Messages:
    4,065
    Location:
    devon, uk
    I posted these years ago here, but they're relevant again, I guess -


    One 1970s gas fire removed -

    603493_10151164855442065_645493331_n_zps733c88a9.jpg
    (Note the green shag carpet and tasteful stick on veneer...and, of course, the wood chip wall paper)

    One beam replaced (reclaimed elm) -

    387693_10151298449607065_1223425766_n_zpsc60a193e.jpg

    One Rayburn to be connected -

    DSCF5366_zps643ec03f.jpg

    The plaster around that is lime too, but a different texture to the stuff in the lounge.


    The slate goes on and on -

    DSCF7567_zpsd4501b79.jpg

    (It's not supposed to have plants in it)


    I'm actually just about to use up the last of the slate on a current project. The final bits will go on some window sills, a step, and a door threshold. You get a lot of slate out of a full size 12x6 snooker table!
     
  15. roofman

    roofman Purveyor of fine English buckets and mops

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    You made it all work brilliantly bud..well done:thumbup:
     
  16. hotponyshoes Member

    Messages:
    1,262
    Location:
    Somerset. Uk
    What about going for a contrast between old and new and use something like a modern stainless screw with a big head?
    41GWhIy77nL._SX342_.jpg
     
  17. Seadog

    Seadog Forum Supporter

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    NE London - UK
    Left-handed, too :D
     
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  18. hotponyshoes Member

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    Anti-theft!
     
  19. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

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    Well spotted Graham
     
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  20. Parm

    Parm I have fun doing stuff

    Messages:
    9,365
    Location:
    Towcester
    Who’s gonna nick his floor boards?
     
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