Painting wood with car paint

  1. RonA

    RonA specialist in repairing sealed for life equipment

    Messages:
    1,500
    Location:
    Stockton on Tees, UK
    I am rapidly moving to the point where I can paint my project car.
    The front of the body is either pressed steel or Aluminium so no problem there. The rear of the car is aluminium sheet clad wooden form work again no problem. Problem is two wooden side rails which connect front & rear of the body. These wil show when the doors are open & need to be the same colour as the rest of the bodywork. Ideally I like them to have a good finish compatible with the metal components.
    Do the spray painting experts on here think a thin skim of body filler suitably sanded down will be the way to go or can the suggest a better way. I could clad them in Aluminium sheet like the back parts but it would be a faff.
    RonA 4B88BBDF-4792-4B6C-9224-FD727627E76A.jpeg 42930A2F-C0F0-401E-8C59-3FCDD9FBBC63.jpeg 901C4970-9F88-4FD9-A45A-C770513A1737.jpeg
     
  2. mr haynes Member

    Messages:
    474
    Location:
    Scotland
    Epoxy primer and top coat as normal. If you want to remove grain then epoxy filler primer probably good enough to smooth
     
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  3. steveo3002 Member

    Messages:
    5,223
    cambridge uk
    yeah some sort of 2k primer to seal the wood , sand until smooth/more primer etc
     
    RonA likes this.
  4. bricol Member

    Messages:
    957
    N.Yorks, UK
    As soon as the wood moves with the changes in atmospheric conditions, cracks are bound to show. Skin it with ali as per the rest, or cover with vinyl or similar.
     
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  5. RonA

    RonA specialist in repairing sealed for life equipment

    Messages:
    1,500
    Location:
    Stockton on Tees, UK
    Was hoping to avoid having to clad it, if I had to go that route it would have to be aluminium
    RonA
     
  6. eSCHEn

    eSCHEn Bit Wrangler Staff Member

    Messages:
    5,744
    Location:
    SW Scotland
    I use any spare expoxy primer (Jotun 87) that I’ve left from a job to patch the front of the shed. It obviously fades from the UV but the important point is that it does crack when the wood moves from sunlight input over the day. This is pretty thin feather and groove so would move more than your frame however. Anyhoo, some pictures in case it helps you Ron :)
     
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    monky harris and RonA like this.
  7. mr haynes Member

    Messages:
    474
    Location:
    Scotland
    You do get flexible epoxys.
    Maybe a bit left field, but cheap, something like stonechip? Some flex and overpaintable
     
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  8. It is quite surprising how flexible Lechler 29107 is. If you flex the mixing cup after curing, you can go some way before it lets go or cracks. I would just do it and see how it goes, it will be a good base for anything else you put over the top at least.
     
  9. Ashley Burton

    Ashley Burton Member

    Messages:
    3,486
    Location:
    Northamptonhire
    Love a good wooden car! :laughing:
     
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  10. Dcal

    Dcal Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    1,820
    Location:
    Antrim Northern Ireland
    I asked a paint rep the same question about wooden windows and was told to make sure the wood was dry, prep then spray it with Barr Coat then on with the primer and top coat.
    It worked for the 10 years I was at that house
    But if the wood can move / swell it's bound to crack.

    Some pf the microporous paints the boat boys use might be a better option or clad it.
     
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  11. Retired Forum Supporter

    Messages:
    321
    Location:
    Huddersfield. UK.
    Hi,

    I'm unsure about painting a wooden car but I've tried most paints on the exterior woodwork of our bungalow.

    Our window frames are original softwood from around 1964; five years ago the double glazed units started to mist up so I removed these and installed made to measure sealed units of Pilkington "K" glass but retained the still perfect wooden frames. We live on a very steep valley side subjected to extremes of weather. For many years I tried various make of oil based gloss such as Sikkens and Johnstones but these always failed.

    I had subscribed to "Fine Homebuilding" magazine (American) for years and always admired the clapboard houses all being painted and how the paint seemed to last. I wanted Benjamin Moore paint but it wasn't available here in the UK but when I gave the bungalow exterior a comprehensive makeover suddenly Benjamin Moore paint was now available through Shaws the sole importer;

    https://www.benjaminmoorepaint.co.uk/about-us/shaw-paints/

    Benjamin Moore paint is expensive but actually the cheapest because why spend a great deal of time prepping only for paint to fail? It took over five US gallons to do the job and what a huge transformation; the paint has suffered all kinds of hostile weather but still looks as good as when I first applied it; the paint is water based so clean up is very easy indeed.

    On the front bedroom window frame bottom this was the worst to protect; whichever oil based paint I applied it needed doing again within a year;this Benjamin Moore paint just laughs at what's thrown at it and it's colourfast. I used Aura Exterior satin;

    https://www.benjaminmoorepaint.co.uk/products/aura-exterior/

    Dcal gives good advice when saying the wood must be dry before being painted. I appreciate this isn't a home renovation thread but I thought it worth mentioning Benjamin Moore paint. Sorry if I'm hijacking the thread.

    Kind regards, Colin.

    Exterior paint._0001.JPG

    Bungalow exterior comprehensive makeover using Benjamin Moore paint. Done 2016 and still looks just the same in 2020.

    Exterior paint._0003.JPG

    The front of the bungalow suffers extremes of weather but this Benjamin Moore paint over four years is excellent.

    Exterior paint._0004.JPG

    Here's the front bedroom window frame that caused me endless problems; I tried lots of makes of paint including car manifold heat resistant paint but still had to repaint every year; absolutely no problems now with the Benjamin Moore paint as seen in the first picture.
     
    Dcal likes this.
  12. RonA

    RonA specialist in repairing sealed for life equipment

    Messages:
    1,500
    Location:
    Stockton on Tees, UK
    Thanks for the info, sound advice & will certainly bear it in mind when repainting stuff on the house. As posted its about the car, wooden side rails need to be same colour as the rest of the body & as far as I can see the only way to achieve that is to paint the wood with same paint ss the rest of the body. Thanks for the reply.
    RonA
     
    Retired likes this.
  13. Farside

    Farside Badly Welded Man

    Messages:
    3,550
    Location:
    Ireland
    Johnstone / International Yacht Paint.
    Goes on easily, flexes plenty, doesn't peel off and lasts for years.
     
    Retired likes this.
  14. the snooper

    the snooper getting older by the day

    Messages:
    20,350
    Location:
    Hull UK
    I painted an electric guitar body I made, I used bar coat on it and it sealed the grain well, it's still as good as the day I painted it
     
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