Old level - levelling a lathe

  1. Rannsachair

    Rannsachair Forum Supporter

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    1,130
    Location:
    Lochgilphead, Argyll, Scotland
    I helped a friend set up the Myford ML7 I arranged for him this weekend.

    So out with my old J.Rabone and sons Level and a selection of shims.

    The level is in an old wooden box like a pencil box:
    [​IMG]
    The metal sleeve over the bubble rotates to protect it:
    [​IMG]

    Its a nice old tool:
    [​IMG]

    Am guessing it is prewar, so fitting to use it on a 1950 lathe.
     
  2. 123hotchef Member

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    its not level!:o
     
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  3. roofman

    roofman Purveyor of fine English buckets and mops

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    Very nice little gem...how accurate is it?
     
  4. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

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    UK London
    I hate to re-open this old can of worms but you know you don’t need to level a lathe really? You could bolt it to the wall if you felt like it. Levelling is usually done to more easily dial out any twist or distortion.
     
  5. Rannsachair

    Rannsachair Forum Supporter

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    Location:
    Lochgilphead, Argyll, Scotland
    Pic is on my lathe with dirty slides ;)
     
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  6. Rannsachair

    Rannsachair Forum Supporter

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    more accurate than any other level I have. Though have never calibrated it.
     
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  7. Rannsachair

    Rannsachair Forum Supporter

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    Location:
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    One end of the drip tray under the lathe mounting was corroded: so I was not happy bolting down onto something not flat.
     
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  8. sg66 Member

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    northeast
    That's ok, there is a little adjustment screw that will be easy to sort out
     
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  9. Pete.

    Pete. Member

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    Those vials are usually set in plaster, I guess because 1 it's easy and cheap and 2 it won't put pressure on the vial with temperature increase. The shield not only protects the vial mechanically but keeps it safe from radiant heat/sunlight to prevent the alcohol inside expanding and bursting the vial.

    That's a tidy old example, not having a set measuring range since it only has the two lines but plenty good enough for comparative measurements, which is what you use when shimming the twist out of a bed.
     
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  10. pressbrake1

    pressbrake1 Member

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    1,520
    essex england
    Not quite right
    Ok you use a level mainly for taking out twist not absolute level but lathes are aligned to compensate for gravity so reasonable level is a good idea
     
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  11. Hopefuldave Intergalactic pot-mender

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    And the coolant drains better right way up...

    Dave H. (the other one)
     
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  12. Spark plug

    Spark plug Member

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    3,391
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    Durham, England
    When levelling a lathe, essentially your trying to replicate the conditions when the lathe was assembled and setup at the factory, which was most likely level. Then from level you can adjust for any twist or inaccuracies.
     
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