Oil for an oak worktop.

  1. dobbslc

    dobbslc Member

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    3,924
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    I've got new oak worktops in the kitchen and the fitters left us some oil but its run out with only 2 coats being done so I need more oil. It seems it was linseed oil with other nutrients added ( their sales blurb ) so what can I use?
    Is it ok the use Osmo oil or any other type?
     
  2. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

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    stuvy and dobbslc like this.
  3. Shox Dr

    Shox Dr Chief Engineer to Carlos Fandango

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    I’ve always used Danish Oil. Blather it on, moving it about until there are no dry patches, wipe off the excess, let dry and repeat until it will take no more.

    Edit; just looked at @eLuSiVeMiTe linky, and thats what I use.
     
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  4. Shox Dr

    Shox Dr Chief Engineer to Carlos Fandango

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    this is a work top in my kitchen, fitted 20yrs ago, and treated only the once when fitted.

    image.jpg
     
  5. Wightsparks

    Wightsparks Forum Supporter

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    yep Danish oil for me too.... Except the bit in the garage that is finest Castrol
     
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  6. Welderpaul

    Welderpaul Moderator Staff Member

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    I used Liberon Tung oil on our Oak worktops - I kept putting it on until it would take no more. I did it 8-10 months ago and it still looks good despite the efforts of a 5 year old's with her constant spillages.

    I think Danish oil is quite similar to Tung oil finish wise.

    Our oak doors are done with Osmo oil. To me this is a bit more like a varnish as it does actually dry fairly hard. I did our kitchen table with Osmo oil and it doesnt perform as well as Tung oil does.
     
  7. dobbslc

    dobbslc Member

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    Ok Toolstation Danish oi, it is then!
    Do you actually live in that house? Ours will have knocks, stains and burn marks on it I'm sure....
     
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  8. Tangledfeet

    Tangledfeet Forum Supporter

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    Danish oil is tung oil with addition of solvents and driers.
     
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  9. 8ob

    8ob Member

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    I used the gear below in the kitchen at the yard , still ok twenty odd years on and that kitchen takes a hammering. Downside is the surface always feels very slightly tacky, may be the way I applied it but if I leave a loaf of bread on there too long it very slightly sticks to it.

    Bob

    [​IMG]

    The horsey lot work it very hard :)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

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    4,729
    UK London
    Funny thing is, I'm doing a set of solid oak dining chairs right now. Restoration job. I went for Tung oil and intend to finish with beeswax. Both products are food safe. Received wisdom states Tung oil needs to dry fully (24 hours) before recoating, 2-3 coats max then wax.

    Since I wasn't sure what the finish was, I needed to get it off. Probably lacquer then user applied Mr Sheen (it was grubby and tacky).

    [​IMG]

    Take down to bare wood.

    [​IMG]

    Tung oil and buff.

    [​IMG]

    Looks like it will work now have half a dozen to do and make them match.
     
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  11. slim_boy_fat

    slim_boy_fat Forum Supporter

    That's a pretty fancy kitchen to be at a yard - you're spoiling that lot! :thumbup: :D
     
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  12. grim_d

    grim_d Member

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    I wouldn't be using any chemical laden products such as Danish oil unless they are specifically labelled as food safe.

    Danish oil gives a bit of a gloss if that's your thing and to echo the above it does always feel tacky, I would recommend a mix of food safe mineral oil and organic beeswax, melt it all down in a pot and you can change the ratios to get a consistency you like for application.

    Works great, looks great and is cheap.
     
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  13. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

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    Most Danish oils are food and toy safe.
    DO shouldn't remain tacky.
    The sapele table next to me has no tack but had 3 coats of oil.
     
  14. Shox Dr

    Shox Dr Chief Engineer to Carlos Fandango

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    Location:
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    We do, we spent alot of money building our house, still love it and treat it with respect.

    God forbid anyone was to place a hot pan on the worktops. Everyone knows I would boil their bones for glue.

    Same worktop difference angle.

    image.jpg


    @grim_d. Danish oil only leaves a tacky finish if its not applied correctly. As for not been food safe, well after 20yrs of use around the Hob, I haven't grown an extra nut yet:laughing:
     
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  15. Screwdriver

    Screwdriver Member

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    4,729
    UK London
    Yes I am. Big fan of Danish oil and (so far as I am aware) it is also food safe but the bonus is it dries quicker and is more like a varnish. I don't need that bonus and am happy to leave each coat of Tung oil to sit overnight to give it the best chance to penetrate the hard oak before the next coat.
     
  16. grim_d

    grim_d Member

    Messages:
    1,578
    Location:
    Scotland - Ayrshire
    Most, not all,some have horrible synthetic resins in them.

    Not tacky as such but because of the gloss it kind of sticks to your skin...like when you're sweaty. :D I guess it also depends on the amount of resin in it...they are all different

    I just don't like glossy wood...or maybe I'm too sweaty.

    Last Danish oil I used definitely stayed tacky for a while....but that's because Screwfix put Danish oil in the garden furniture oil tin and I slathered it on. :D
     
  17. eLuSiVeMiTe

    eLuSiVeMiTe Forum Supporter

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    6,964
    Location:
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    Rustins or liberon. Tried cheaper options but always come back to rustins.
     
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  18. Shox Dr

    Shox Dr Chief Engineer to Carlos Fandango

    Messages:
    13,270
    Location:
    East Yorkshire
    It’s certainly not same, I had a leftovers of a 5lt tin for yrs, never dried up, I used every last drop. Bought 1lt when it n out, that lasted less than 1yr before it was crusting over and drying up.
     
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